Chickasaw County, Mississippi

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Chickasaw County, Mississippi
Chickasaw County Courthouse.jpg
East façade of Chickasaw County, Mississippi Court House
Map of Mississippi highlighting Chickasaw County
Location in the state of Mississippi
Map of the United States highlighting Mississippi
Mississippi's location in the U.S.
Founded 1836
Named for Chickasaw people
Seat Houston and Okolona
Largest city Houston
Area
 • Total 504.27 sq mi (1,306 km2)
 • Land 501.56 sq mi (1,299 km2)
 • Water 2.71 sq mi (7 km2), 0.54%
Population
 • (2010) 17,392
 • Density 39/sq mi (15/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.chickasawcoms.com

Chickasaw County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,392.[1] Its county seats are Houston and Okolona.[2] The county is named for the Chickasaw people, who lived in this area for hundreds of years. Most were removed to Indian Territory in the 1830s, but some remained and became citizens of the state and United States.

Early in the 20th century, the first agricultural high school in Mississippi opened in the unincorporated community of Buena Vista. Cully Cobb, a pioneer of southern agriculture, long-term farm publisher, and an official of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration in Washington, D.C., was the superintendent of the school from 1908-1910.[3]

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 504.27 square miles (1,306.1 km2), of which 501.56 square miles (1,299.0 km2) (or 99.46%) is land and 2.71 square miles (7.0 km2) (or 0.54%) is water.[4]


Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

History[edit]

First Known Settlers[edit]

European Contact[edit]

Hernando de Soto

French

English

American Settlement[edit]

Hopewell Treaty

Trail of tears

The County was created in 1836 by Mississippi Legislature and was quickly settled by Americans from the East Coast. By the time of the Civil War there were many large cotton plantations and the slave population had grown larger than the free population.[5]

Civil War[edit]

The Civil War devastated the economy and to some degree the infrastructure of the county. Newly freed slaves had little resources or skills to provide for themselves and many white families who were dependent on the cotton economy were destitute. Farmers diversified crops and the economy showed very slow improvement.[6]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 2,955
1850 16,369 453.9%
1860 16,426 0.3%
1870 19,899 21.1%
1880 17,905 −10.0%
1890 19,891 11.1%
1900 19,892 0.0%
1910 22,846 14.9%
1920 22,212 −2.8%
1930 20,835 −6.2%
1940 21,427 2.8%
1950 18,951 −11.6%
1960 16,891 −10.9%
1970 16,805 −0.5%
1980 17,853 6.2%
1990 18,085 1.3%
2000 19,440 7.5%
2010 17,392 −10.5%
Est. 2012 17,416 0.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 17,392 people residing in the county. 54.0% were White, 42.1% Black or African American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Native American, 2.5% of some other race and 1.0% of two or more races. 3.7% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 19,440 people, 7,253 households, and 5,287 families residing in the county. The population density was 39 people per square mile (15/km²). There were 7,981 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 56.89% White, 41.26% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.99% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. 2.29% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

According to the census[8] of 2000, the largest ancestry groups in Chickasaw County were English 44.1%, African 41% and Scots-Irish 13.5%.

There were 7,253 households out of which 36.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.80% were married couples living together, 18.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.10% were non-families. 24.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county the population was spread out with 28.60% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 21.00% from 45 to 64, and 13.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 92.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,364, and the median income for a family was $33,819. Males had a median income of $25,459 versus $20,099 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,279. About 16.80% of families and 20.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.90% of those under age 18 and 22.40% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Famous natives[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 3, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "The Founders of the Cobb Institute of Archaeology". Mississippi State University. Retrieved July 16, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Census 2010 Gazetteer Files". Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Chickasaw County History". msgw.org. Retrieved October 9, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Chickasaw County History". msgw.org. Retrieved October 9, 2014. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved September 3, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Coordinates: 33°55′N 88°57′W / 33.92°N 88.95°W / 33.92; -88.95