Chief Construction Adviser to UK Government

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The role of Chief Construction Adviser is a British civil service appointment. It was created by United Kingdom ministers in 2009 to provide cross-departmental coordination and leadership on UK construction industry policy.

History[edit]

The "creation of a post of Chief Construction Officer" was recommended by the House of Commons Business and Enterprise Select Committee in July 2008.[1] The UK government directly or indirectly provides around 40% of the construction industry's workload so its influence as a client is significant.

Paul Morrell was the first person appointed to this pan-departmental role, with a slightly revised title of 'chief construction adviser', in November 2009; the role was initially for two years, and Morrell was re-appointed for a further one-year term in October 2011.[2]

In July 2012, the name of Morrell's successor, Peter Hansford, was announced.[3] Hansford took up the role on 1 December 2012. On 2 July 2014, construction minister Michael Fallon announced that Hansford's term of office would be extended to November 2015.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Construction Matters, Ninth Report of Session 2007–08 (accessed: 3 March 2012)
  2. ^ Paul Morrell has been re-appointed as the Government’s chief construction adviser by Business Minister Mark Prisk (accessed: 3 March 2012)
  3. ^ Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. "Government names new Chief Construction Adviser". Wiredgov.net. Retrieved 2 August 2012. 
  4. ^ Fitzpatrick, Tom (2 July 2014). "Peter Hansford to remain as construction adviser until November 2015". Construction News. Retrieved 2 July 2014. 
  5. ^ Hayman, Allister (2 July 2014). "Government hands Hansford an extra year in post". Building. Retrieved 2 July 2014.