Childwall

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Coordinates: 53°23′42″N 2°52′52″W / 53.395°N 2.881°W / 53.395; -2.881

Childwall
Tower and hearse house, All Saints' Church, Childwall.jpg
All Saints' Church, Childwall (October 2006).
Childwall is located in Merseyside
Childwall
Childwall
 Childwall shown within Merseyside
Population 14,085 (2008)[1]
OS grid reference SJ414890
Metropolitan borough City of Liverpool
Metropolitan county Merseyside
Region North West
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LIVERPOOL
Postcode district L16
Dialling code 0151
Police Merseyside
Fire Merseyside
Ambulance North West
EU Parliament North West England
UK Parliament Liverpool Wavertree
List of places
UK
England
Merseyside

Childwall is an affluent suburb of Liverpool, Merseyside, England and a Liverpool City Council Ward. Historically in Lancashire, it is located to the south of the city, bordered by Gateacre, Wavertree, Belle Vale, Broadgreen, Bowring Park and Mossley Hill. In 2008 the population was recorded as 14,085.[1]

History[edit]

The earliest recorded reference to Childwall was in the Domesday Book of 1086.

"Four Radmans held Childwall as four Manors. There is half a hide. It was worth eight shillings. There was a priest, having half a carucate of land in frank almoign."[2][3]

Childwall was known as Cileuuelle in the 1086 Domesday Book meaning 'a stream where youngsters meet' from the Old English words cild and wella. Historically the name has been recorded as Childewalle (1212 and 1332), Chaldewall (1238), Childwall (1261), Childewelle (1291), Chaldewal (1305) and Childewall (1354).[4]

Childwall was traditionally part of the West Derby Hundred. It was an urban district from the Local Government Act 1894 until it was annexed to Liverpool in 1913.[5]

All Saints' Church, Childwall, is the oldest church in Liverpool and still has a lively and full congregation to this date. Though Childwall still maintains a large Jewish community, since the 1980s this has been in gradual decline with some of those formerly of the Childwall Jewish community now living in Gateacre and Allerton.

Description[edit]

Childwall is dominated by the "Childwall Fiveways", a roundabout that is one of the busiest in Liverpool and has developed into a hotspot for upmarket bars and restaurants since the turn of the millennium. Housing is almost entirely detached or semi-detached; there are very few terraces within Childwall. The area's pleasant greenery in abundance and range of large houses makes it one of Liverpool's most sought-after suburbs.

Childwall's public houses include the Childwall Abbey- of which once played host to a fledgling incarnation of The Beatles (who were to be managed by a famous resident of the area- Brian Epstein), then known as The Quarrymen, the Halfway House and the Childwall Fiveways. From 2009, the Halfway House became the starting point for regular Tom Slemen's Haunted Liverpool Ghost and Murder Tours of Childwall, in aid of Freshfields Animal Rescue.

Lime Pictures, formerly Mersey Television, is based in the area and produces Hollyoaks for Channel Four. Childwall was also the home of Brookside until 2003, and the BBC's Grange Hill between 2003 and 2008.

Education[edit]

Primary schools[edit]

  • Childwall Church of England Primary School
  • King David Schools (encompassing a Nursery, Primary, High School and Sixth Form)
  • Our Lady's Bishop Eton Roman Catholic Primary & Junior School
  • Rudston Infant & Junior School
  • St Paschal Baylon Roman Catholic Primary School

Secondary schools[edit]

Higher education[edit]

Transport[edit]

The nearest railway station is either Mossley Hill or Broadgreen. Historically there was also Childwall railway station.

Regular bus services connect the district with Liverpool John Lennon Airport and the city centre, as well as surrounding districts.

Notable residents[edit]

Government[edit]

The elected councillors for Childwall are Cllrs Ruth Hirschfield and Jeremy Wolfson of the Labour Party, and Cllr Pat Moloney of the Liberal Democrats.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Childwall Ward (pdf), Liverpool City Council, 2008 
  2. ^ Brief History, All Saints Parish Church, Childwall, retrieved 26 March 2008 
  3. ^ Wild, Jonathon, The History of Childwall, retrieved 23 January 2009 
  4. ^ Townships: Childwall, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, British History Online, 1907, pp. 108–111, retrieved 6 February 2009 
  5. ^ Liverpool, A Vision Of Britain Through Time, retrieved 26 March 2008 
  6. ^ Spent childhood at 15 Eastham Close per his autobiography Anfield Days and Wembley Ways (Sport Media 2011)

External links[edit]