Chilean escudo

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Chilean escudo
escudo chileno  (Spanish)
ISO 4217 code CLE
Central bank Banco Central de Chile
 Website www.bcentral.cl
User(s) Chile
Subunit
 1/100 centésimo
Symbol
Coins 10, 50, 100 escudos
Banknotes 500, 1000, 5000, 10 000 Escudos
Mint Casa de Moneda
 Website www.cmoneda.cl
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.

The escudo was the currency of Chile between 1960 and 1975, divided into 100 centésimos. It replaced the (old) peso at a rate of 1 escudo = 1000 pesos and was itself replaced by a new peso, at a rate of 1 peso = 1000 escudos. The symbol Eº was used for the escudo.

Note also that Chile issued gold escudos, worth 16 reales or 2 pesos until 1851.

Coins[edit]

In 1960, aluminium 1 centésimo and aluminium-bronze 2, 5 and 10 centésimo coins were introduced, followed by aluminium ½ centésimo in 1962. In 1971, a new coinage was introduced, consisting of aluminium-bronze 10, 20 and 50 centésimos and cupro-nickel 1, 2 and 5 escudos. This coinage was issued for two years, with aluminium 5 escudos produced in 1972. In 1974 and 1975, aluminium 10 escudos and nickel-brass 50 and 100 escudos were issued.

Banknotes[edit]

In 1959, provisional banknotes were produced by the Banco Central de Chile. These were modified versions of the old peso notes, with the centésimo or escudo denomination added to the design. Denominations were ½, 1, 5, 10 and 50 centésimos, 1, 5, 10 and 50 escudos. Regular-type notes were introduced in 1962 in denominations of ½, 1, 5, 10, 50 and 100 escudos. In 1971, 500 escudo notes were introduced, followed by 1000 escudos and 5000 escudos in 1973 (depicting José Miguel Carrera) and 10,000 escudos in 1974 (depicting an unusual portrait of Bernardo O'Higgins).

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by:
(Old) Chilean peso
Ratio: 1 escudo = 1000 pesos
Currency of Chile
January 1, 1960 – 1975
Succeeded by:
(New) Chilean peso
Ratio: 1 peso = 1000 escudos