Chilton County, Alabama

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Chilton County, Alabama
Chilton County Courthouse.jpg
Chilton County Courthouse in Clanton
Map of Alabama highlighting Chilton County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded December 30, 1868
Named for William Parish Chilton, Sr.
Seat Clanton
Largest city Calera
Area
 • Total 701 sq mi (1,816 km2)
 • Land 693 sq mi (1,795 km2)
 • Water 7.9 sq mi (20 km2), (1.1%)
Population
 • (2010) 43,643
 • Density 63/sq mi (24/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.chiltoncounty.org

Chilton County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 43,643.[1] The county seat is Clanton and it is a prohibition, or dry county. Its name is in honor of William Parish Chilton, Sr. (1810–1871), a lawyer who became Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court and later represented Montgomery County in the Congress of the Confederate States of America.

Chilton County is included in the Birmingham-Hoover, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area.

In 2010, the center of population of Alabama was located in Chilton County, near the city of Jemison, an area known as Jemison Division.[2]

In 1942, the U.S. Navy commissioned a new vessel, the USS Chilton, in honor of Chilton County.

The county is known for its peaches and its unique landscape. It is home to swamps, prairies and mountains due to the foothills of the Appalachians which end in the county, the Coosa River basin, and its proximity to the Black Belt Prairie.

History[edit]

Baker County was established on December 30, 1868, named for Alfred Baker, with its county seat at Grantville. Residents of the county petitioned the Alabama legislature for the renaming of their county, it was not something forced upon them. On December 17, 1874, the petitioners accepted the suggestion of Chilton County, even though the Chief Justice had not lived within its boundaries.[3] It is not known when the county seat was moved.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 701 square miles (1,820 km2), of which 693 square miles (1,790 km2) is land and 7.9 square miles (20 km2) (1.1%) is water.[4]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 6,194
1880 10,793 74.2%
1890 14,549 34.8%
1900 16,522 13.6%
1910 23,187 40.3%
1920 22,770 −1.8%
1930 24,579 7.9%
1940 27,955 13.7%
1950 26,922 −3.7%
1960 25,693 −4.6%
1970 25,180 −2.0%
1980 30,612 21.6%
1990 32,458 6.0%
2000 39,593 22.0%
2010 43,643 10.2%
Est. 2013 43,951 0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2013[1]

2010[edit]

Whereas according to the 2010 United States Census Bureau:


Chilton County is the 23rd richest county per capita income in Alabama.[9]

2000[edit]

At the 2000 census,[10] there were 39,593 people, 15,287 households and 11,342 families residing in the county. The population density was 57 per square mile (22/km2). There were 17,651 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 86.71% White, 10.61% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.51% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. Nearly 2.91% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 15,287 households of which 34.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.10% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.80% were non-families. Nearly 22.90% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57, and the average family size was 3.00.

25.70% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 12.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.90 males.

The median household income was $32,588 and the median family income was $39,505. Males had a median income of $31,006 versus $21,275 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,303. About 12.60% of families and 15.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.40% of those under age 18 and 18.20% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Central Alabama Genealogy". Retrieved 2012-04-30. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  9. ^ http://www.worldlistmania.com/50-richest-counties-in-alabama-by-per-capita-income/
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°50′43″N 86°42′52″W / 32.84528°N 86.71444°W / 32.84528; -86.71444