China national football team

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China PR
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) 龙之队 Lóng Zhī Duì
(Team Dragon)
国足 Guó Zú
(National Football Team)
Association Chinese Football Association
Sub-confederation EAFF (East Asia)
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Head coach France Alain Perrin
Captain Zheng Zhi
Most caps Li Weifeng (112)
Top scorer Hao Haidong (41)
FIFA code CHN
FIFA ranking 97 Decrease 3 (14 August 2014)
Highest FIFA ranking 37 (December 1998)
Lowest FIFA ranking 109 (March 2013)
Elo ranking 74
Highest Elo ranking 26 (October 2001)
Lowest Elo ranking 80 (December 2008)
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Philippines 2–1 Republic of China Republic of China (1912–49)
(Manila, Philippines; February 4, 1913)
Biggest win
China China PR 19–0 Guam 
(Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; January 26, 2000)
Biggest defeat
 Brazil 8–0 China PR China
(Recife, Brazil; September 10, 2012)
World Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 2002)
Best result Round 1: 2002
Asian Cup
Appearances 9 (First in 1976)
Best result Runners-up: 1984 & 2004

The China national football team (Chinese: 中国国家足球队; pinyin: Zhōngguó Guójiā Zúqiú Duì), nicknamed The Dragon or The Great Wall is the national association football team of the People's Republic of China and is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Team China" (中国队), the "National Team" (国家队) or "Guózú" (国足, short for 国家足球, which means "national football").

The team was founded in 1924 in the Republic of China and joined FIFA in 1931. Following the Chinese Civil War, the CFA was formed in the newly founded People's Republic of China. They remained affiliated with FIFA until 1958, when they withdrew, but they rejoined in 1979. After the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong from the United Kingdom in 1997, and Macau from Portugal in 1999, these two special administrative regions have continued to have their own teams, which play as "Hong Kong" and "Macau, China", respectively.

China have won the East Asian Cup twice in 2005 and 2010, they have been runners-up at the Asian Cup twice in 1984 and 2004. Although China failed to score a goal in their maiden FIFA World Cup appearance in 2002, losing all their matches, just qualifying for the tournament has been considered the greatest accomplishment in their football history.

Though football lacks a long history in China, there were over 250 million viewers for the 2004 AFC Asian Cup Final, the largest single-event sports audience in the country's history at that time.[1]

History[edit]

1924–1978[edit]

The Chinese Football Association was founded in 1924 and has been affiliated with the FIFA since 1931.[2] China, under the newly instated People's Republic of China, played their first match on 4 August 1952, a friendly against Finland,[3] with Finland being one of the first nations to hold diplomatic relations with China.

For nearly 30 years, China primarily only played friendly matches with nations that recognized the PRC, such as Albania, Burma, Cambodia, Guinea, Hungary, Mongolia, North Korea, North Vietnam, Pakistan, the Soviet Union, Sudan and the United Arab Republic.[3] They however also participated in 1958 World Cup qualifying, where they lost to Indonesia on goal average.

1978–2002[edit]

Chinese football began to grow in popularity in the beginning of the late 1980s through the introduction of televisions in Chinese households. Previously, the most popular international sports in China were badminton and table tennis.

In 1980, China competed in qualifying for a berth in the 1982 World Cup finals, but they lost a play-off game against New Zealand. During the qualifying for the 1986 World Cup, China faced Hong Kong in Beijing in the final match of the first qualifying round on 19 May 1985, where China only needed a draw to advance. However, Hong Kong produced a 2–1 upset win, which resulted in riots between local fans. In qualifying for the 1990 World Cup, China again reached the final round of qualifying but lost to Qatar in their final group game. During the qualifiers for the 1994 World Cup they failed to reach the final round of qualifying, coming second behind Iraq. China was on the verge of making it through the qualifying for the 1998 World Cup but lost crucial matches at home against Qatar and Iran.

On 26 January 2000, China beat Guam 19–0 in 2000 Asian Cup qualification, which was the world record for the largest victory margin in an international football match at the time. The record however was broken by Kuwait 19 days later.

On 7 October 2001, China, under the direction of head coach Bora Milutinović, advanced to the 2002 World Cup; the first time China had reached a World Cup. However, they failed to score a single goal, losing all three group matches and were eliminated in the group stage.

2002–2009[edit]

China national football team
China national football team 06-JUN-2008-ANZstad.jpg
The players of the China PR national football team prior to taking on Australia in a World Cup qualification game on 22 June 2008. The match was played at Stadium Australia in Sydney.
Traditional Chinese 中國國家足球隊
Simplified Chinese 中国国家足球队
Nickname
Traditional Chinese 萬里長城
Simplified Chinese 万里长城
Literal meaning The Great Wall

In November 2004, the team failed to advance through the preliminary qualification stage for the 2006 World Cup, losing out to Kuwait on goals difference, despite China's seven goals against Hong Kong in the last qualifying match. Head coach Arie Haan was later replaced by Zhu Guanghu.

In August 2005, China won the 2005 East Asian Football Championship with a 1–1 draw against Korea Republic, 2–2 draw against Japan and a 2–0 victory against Korea DPR. It became their first international title ever.

While qualifying for the 2007 AFC Asian Cup in 2006, the team became the subject of immense criticism in the media and a national embarrassment when they had managed to score only one goal (a Shao Jiayi penalty kick well during the dying moments injury time) against Singapore at home in Tianjin, and only managed a draw with the Southeast Asian city-state in the away game. In preparation for the 2007 Asian Cup, the team spent the weeks leading up to the tournament on a tour of the United States. While the 4–1 loss to the United States was not unexpected,[4] a 1–0 loss to a Real Salt Lake team that finished bottom of the MLS that season caused serious concern.[5][6]

During the Asian Cup 2007, the team played three games, winning against Malaysia, drawing with Iran after leading 2–1 at half time, and losing to 3–0 Uzbekistan. After high expectations, China's performance drew immense criticism on online communities, which condemned the coach Zhu Guanghu, players, and the Chinese Football Association in general. Zhu was later replaced by Vladimir Petrović for this poor performance. Some commented that China's reliance on foreign coaches for the past decade had been an indicator of its poor domestic coach development system.[7]

In June 2008, China, once again, failed to qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, losing against Qatar and Iraq at home. After 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, Yin Tiesheng became the caretaker of the team.

Gao Hongbo era[edit]

In April 2009, China appointed the young Gao Hongbo as coach, replacing Yin Tiesheng. His arrival saw China opting for a new strategy, turning towards ground passing tactics and adopting the 4–2–3–1 formation. It was noted that Chinese footballers had relied too heavily on the long balls and header strategy for almost a decade. Above all, Wei Di, the chief of the Chinese Football Association, stressed that, "Anytime, no matter win or loss, they must show their team spirit and courage. I hope, after one year's effort, the national team can give the public a new image."[8]

Under Gao, China drew its first game against Germany 1-1 during a friendly in May 2009. Afterwards, China were able to gain 13 points in the Asian Cup qualifications for 2011. This led to a revival in interest amongst some Chinese football fans, as China had also won 1-0 against France in June 2010, as well as holding World Cup quarter finalsts Paraguay to a 1-1 draw in September 2010. With some even thinking that reaching the semi finals of the Asian Cup being possible. However during the tournament itself, China were knocked out in the group stages. This led to some discontent amongst Chinese fans, plus it also seems that this was the reason that eventually led to the replacement of Gao by the CFA. Although Gao's winning percentage (65%) was the highest for a Chinese manager since Nian Weisi (67.86%), and has not been defeated since the end of the Asian Cup in 2011, this was still not enough to convince the CFA of replacing him. And in August 2011, he was replaced by José Antonio Camacho, less than a month before the World Cup qualifiers for 2014.

But corruption still remains a problem in Chinese football, and in 2010, Wei admitted that recently, "Chinese football has degraded to an intolerable level. It has hurt the feelings of fans and Chinese people at large", he added that he was confident in being able to aid Chinese men's and women's football return to the leading status in Asia and world respectively in future. Wei pointed out six major problems which had caused the "huge slump" of Chinese football in the past few years, while he dissected the dwindling pool of young player selection as being a big problem along with unhealthy professional leagues affected by gambling and match fixing scandals.[8][9]

Appointment of José Antonio Camacho[edit]

On 13 August 2011, José Antonio Camacho of Spain was appointed as the head coach of the Chinese national football team, signing a three-year deal for a reported annual salary of $8 million.[10] The Chinese Football Association head Wei Di explained the decision as being part of a long-term plan to help the country catch up with Japan and South Korea. He noted that, "Compared with our neighbours Japan and South Korea, Chinese football is lagging far behind, we need to work with a long-term view and start to catch up with a pragmatic approach. A lot of our fans expect China to qualify for the 2014 World Cup finals in Brazil. They are afraid that changing the coach at the last moment may cause bad effect to the team's qualifying prospect. I can totally understand that. But we do not have any time to waste."[11]

Chinese Football Administrative Centre vice-president Yu Hongchen added: "The qualifying stage of 2014 World Cup is just a temporary task for him. Even if the task is failed, Camacho will not lose the job. When we started to find a new coach for the national team, we mainly focus on European countries such as Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. First of all, they have advanced football concepts, and secondly they have a productive youth training system, which we can learn from. We hope he can help us to find a suitable style."[11]

However, China failed to qualify for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, after only finishing third in the third qualifying round, with 3 wins and 3 losses out of 6 games played.

During a friendly match Spain in 2012, many football experts and pundits alike expected Spain to easily steamroll China. However, many critics were stunned to find China and Spain still deadlocked 0-0 until the 84th minute when a goal from Manchester City attacking midfielder David Silva gave Spain the only goal of the match. Even though they lost, this performance was viewed highly in the Chinese media as well as Zeng Cheng, China's goalkeeper, who made a number of exceptional saves from La Furia Roja. China went on to face Vietnam, a few days later, where they easily won 3-0 with a brace from Gao Lin and Feng Renliang. Disappointment would soon strike again, two months later, when China faced Sweden only to lose 1-0 with the lone goal coming minutes after the 2nd half. Camacho coached a young squad to an 8-0 loss to Brazil on September 10, 2012 in a friendly match, which would go on record as China's worst ever defeat in their history as well as also succumbing China to their worst ever FIFA World Rankings of 109.[12] It was the worst defeat for China since their loss to the United States in 1992.

After a disappointing FIFA World Cup qualification Camacho lead China in their 2015 AFC Asian Cup qualification campaign where in the first qualification group game China lost 2-1 to Saudi Arabia.[13] Camacho then managed China on 15 June 2013 against Thailand in a shocking 5-1 loss to a team ranked 142 and 47 places below China. This loss then saw Camacho subsequently sacked a week later with Fu Bo assigned the caretaker role.

Alain Perrin era[edit]

Under Frenchman Alain Perrin, China continued their qualifying for 2015 AFC Asian Cup. But it was their worst qualifying result ever, since China qualified by the best third-placed team. They were even almost eliminated by Lebanon.

Stadium[edit]

The Workers Stadium (simplified Chinese: 工人体育场; traditional Chinese: 工人體育場; Pinyin: Gōngrén Tǐyùcháng) is a multi-purpose stadium in Beijing with a capacity of 70,161. It was built in 1959 and was last renovated in 2004. It is mostly used for football matches and was the main venue for the 1990 Asian Games, where the opening and closing ceremonies took place. Beijing Guoan also use the stadium to play their home league games.

Also used frequently by the China team is the Kunming Tuodong Sports Center (昆明拓东体育场) which is a multi-purpose stadium in Kunming, Yunnan Province. The stadium holds 40,000 people. It has been used for international friendly matches since 2010, and recently chosen for the home ground for 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification matches.[citation needed]

Kit[edit]

China's traditional home kit is all red with a white trim while their away kit is traditionally an inverted version of the home kit, fully white with a red trim. During the 1996 AFC Asian Cup, China employed a third kit which was all blue with a white trim and was used against Saudi Arabia.[14] China's current kit is produced and manufactured by Adidas. Recently, the team has started to use cooling vests in certain climates.[15]

Rivalries[edit]

Traditionally, China's greatest rival has been Japan.[16] This was exemplified after Japan beat China 3–1 in the final of the 2004 AFC Asian Cup, when Chinese fans began to riot near the north gate of Beijing's Workers Stadium.[17] The rioting was said to be provoked by controversial officiating and the heightened anti-Japanese sentiment at the time. China's most recent tournament meeting with Japan was at the 2013 East Asian Cup in South Korea, where the two sides drew 3–3. China went on to finish second in the tournament behind Japan.

Another well-known rivalry is with neighbour South Korea. China played 27 matches against South Korea between 1978 and 2010, a span of 32 years, without winning a single match (11 draws and 16 losses). The media coined the term "Koreaphobia" to describe this phenomenon, and China registered its first win against Korea on 10 February 2010 when it won 3–0 in the 2010 East Asian Football Championship, eventually going on to win the tournament.

Media coverage[edit]

Home and away matches are shown on CCTV-5, CCTV-5+, GDTV-Sports, STV-Sports, BTV-6 and the other local sports channels in mainland China.

Coaching staff[edit]

Position Name Nationality
Head coach Alain Perrin  France
Assistant coach Ali Boumnijel  Tunisia
Christian Jahan  France
Fu Bo  China
Goalkeeper coach Ou Chuliang  China
Management Li Tie  China
Tactics analyst Yu Yue  China
Technical employee Li Haipeng  China

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

Match Date: 4 September 2014 Opposition:  Kuwait
Match Date: 9 September 2014 Opposition:  Jordan
Caps and goals correct as of: 29 June 2014 v.  Mali

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Zeng Cheng (1987-01-08) 8 January 1987 (age 27) 28 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande
1GK Wang Dalei (1989-01-10) 10 January 1989 (age 25) 5 0 China Shandong Luneng
1GK Yan Junling (1991-01-28) 28 January 1991 (age 23) 0 0 China Shanghai East Asia
2DF Feng Xiaoting (1985-10-22) 22 October 1985 (age 28) 38 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande
2DF Zhang Linpeng (captain) (1989-05-09) 9 May 1989 (age 25) 35 4 China Guangzhou Evergrande
2DF Wu Xi (1989-02-19) 19 February 1989 (age 25) 13 1 China Jiangsu Sainty
2DF Li Xuepeng (1988-09-18) 18 September 1988 (age 25) 12 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande
2DF Zheng Zheng (1989-07-11) 11 July 1989 (age 25) 7 2 China Shandong Luneng
2DF Lang Zheng (1986-07-22) 22 July 1986 (age 28) 4 0 China Beijing Guoan
2DF Ren Hang (1989-02-23) 23 February 1989 (age 25) 3 0 China Jiangsu Sainty
2DF Mei Fang (1989-11-14) 14 November 1989 (age 24) 2 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande
3MF Zhao Xuri (1985-12-03) 3 December 1985 (age 28) 66 2 China Guangzhou Evergrande
3MF Yu Hai (1987-06-04) 4 June 1987 (age 27) 45 9 China Guizhou Renhe
3MF Yu Hanchao (1987-02-25) 25 February 1987 (age 27) 30 5 China Guangzhou Evergrande
3MF Sun Ke (1989-08-26) 26 August 1989 (age 25) 15 3 China Jiangsu Sainty
3MF Wu Lei (1991-11-19) 19 November 1991 (age 22) 14 2 China Shanghai East Asia
3MF Zhang Chengdong (1989-02-09) 9 February 1989 (age 25) 8 0 China Beijing Guoan
3MF Zhang Wenzhao (1987-05-28) 28 May 1987 (age 27) 3 0 China Shandong Luneng
3MF Zhang Jiaqi (1991-09-03) 3 September 1991 (age 23) 2 0 China Dalian Aerbin
3MF Cai Huikang (1989-10-10) 10 October 1989 (age 24) 1 0 China Shanghai East Asia
3MF Piao Cheng (1989-08-21) 21 August 1989 (age 25) 0 0 China Beijing Guoan
4FW Gao Lin (1986-02-14) 14 February 1986 (age 28) 73 17 China Guangzhou Evergrande
4FW Yang Xu (1987-02-12) 12 February 1987 (age 27) 27 11 China Changchun Yatai

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have been called up within the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Yang Zhi (1983-01-15) 15 January 1983 (age 31) 37 0 China Beijing Guoan v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
GK Liu Dianzuo (1990-06-26) 26 June 1990 (age 24) 0 0 China Shanghai Shenxin v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
DF Liu Jianye (1987-06-17) 17 June 1987 (age 27) 40 0 China Jiangsu Sainty v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
DF Rong Hao (1987-04-07) 7 April 1987 (age 27) 43 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
DF Yu Yang (1989-08-06) 6 August 1989 (age 25) 7 0 China Beijing Guoan v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
DF Dai Lin (1987-11-28) 28 November 1987 (age 26) 2 0 China Shandong Luneng v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
DF Li Ang (1993-09-15) 15 September 1993 (age 20) 1 0 China Jiangsu Sainty v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
DF Du Wei (1982-02-09) 9 February 1982 (age 32) 68 4 China Shandong Luneng v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
DF Sun Xiang (1982-01-15) 15 January 1982 (age 32) 69 5 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Saudi Arabia, 19 November 2013
MF Liao Lisheng (1993-04-29) 29 April 1993 (age 21) 2 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
MF Zheng Zhi (1980-08-20) 20 August 1980 (age 34) 77 13 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
MF Yang Hao (1983-08-19) 19 August 1983 (age 31) 37 2 China Jiangsu Sainty v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
MF Huang Bowen (1987-07-13) 13 July 1987 (age 27) 29 2 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
MF Zhang Xizhe (1991-01-23) 23 January 1991 (age 23) 10 2 China Beijing Guoan v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
MF Wang Yongpo (1987-01-19) 19 January 1987 (age 27) 8 4 China Shandong Luneng v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
MF Cui Peng (1987-05-31) 31 May 1987 (age 27) 7 0 China Shandong Luneng v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
MF Liu Jian (1984-08-20) 20 August 1984 (age 30) 36 4 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Saudi Arabia, 19 November 2013
MF Jin Jingdao (1992-01-18) 18 January 1992 (age 22) 2 0 China Shandong Luneng v.  Saudi Arabia, 19 November 2013
MF Zheng Long (1988-04-15) 15 April 1988 (age 26) 7 4 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2013
FW Dong Xuesheng (1989-05-22) 22 May 1989 (age 25) 3 0 China Guangzhou Evergrande v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
FW Gao Di (1990-01-06) 6 January 1990 (age 24) 2 1 China Shanghai Greenland v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
FW Chen Zijie (1989-12-24) 24 December 1989 (age 24) 2 0 China Guizhou Renhe v.  Mali, 29 June 2014
FW Qu Bo (1981-07-15) 15 July 1981 (age 33) 78 18 China Qingdao Hainiu v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
FW Yu Dabao (1988-04-18) 18 April 1988 (age 26) 24 5 China Dalian Aerbin v.  Iraq, 5 March 2014
FW Jiang Ning (1986-09-01) 1 September 1986 (age 28) 28 2 China Guangzhou R&F v.  Saudi Arabia, 19 November 2013

Previous squads[edit]

FIFA World Cup squads
AFC Asian Cup squads

Recent and forthcoming fixtures[edit]

Competitive record[edit]

All time results[edit]

As of 29 June 2014, Counted for the FIFA A-level match only.
Nations First Played P W D L GF GA GD Confederation
 Afghanistan 1984 1 1 0 0 6 0 +6 AFC
 Albania 1973 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 UEFA
 Algeria 2004 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CAF
 Andorra 2004 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 UEFA
 Argentina 1984 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CONMEBOL
 Australia 1983 7 4 1 2 10 11 -1 AFC
 Bahrain 1986 6 3 3 0 14 8 +6 AFC
 Bangladesh 1980 5 5 0 0 15 0 +15 AFC
 Bosnia-Herzegovina 1997 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 UEFA
 Botswana 2009 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 CAF
 Brazil 2002 3 0 1 2 0 12 -12 CONMEBOL
 Brunei 1975 3 3 0 0 22 1 +21 AFC
 Cambodia 1963 6 6 0 0 24 3 +21 AFC
 Canada 1984 3 2 0 1 8 7 +1 CONCACAF
 Chile 2003 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CONMEBOL
 Colombia 1995 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 CONMEBOL
 DR Congo 1977 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1 CAF
 Costa Rica 2002 5 1 2 2 6 8 -2 CONCACAF
 Cuba 1971 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CONCACAF
 Egypt 1963 2 0 1 1 0 2 -2 CAF
 El Salvador 2008 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 CONCACAF
 England 1996 1 0 0 1 0 3 -3 UEFA
 Estonia 2003 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 UEFA
 Fiji 1975 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 OFC
 Finland 1952 4 0 0 4 6 7 -1 UEFA
 France 2006 2 1 0 1 2 3 -1 UEFA
 Germany 2005 2 0 1 1 1 2 -1 UEFA
 Ghana 2012 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CAF
 Guam 2000 1 1 0 0 19 0 +19 AFC
 Guinea 1965 3 2 1 0 8 3 +5 CAF
 Haiti 2003 1 0 0 1 3 4 -1 CONCACAF
 Honduras 2006 2 1 0 1 3 1 +2 CONCACAF
 Hong Kong 1975 17 11 4 2 32 6 +26 AFC
 Hungary 2004 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
 India 1956 11 7 4 0 17 5 +12 AFC
 Indonesia 1957 13 10 2 1 32 8 +24 AFC
 Iran 1976 20 4 5 11 18 35 -17 AFC
 Iraq 1976 16 6 2 8 17 18 -1 AFC
 Italy 1986 1 0 0 1 0 2 -2 UEFA
 Jamaica 1977 3 3 0 0 5 0 +5 CONCACAF
 Japan 1975 21 6 6 9 23 27 -4 AFC
 Jordan 1984 10 6 3 1 23 7 +16 AFC
 Kazakhstan 1997 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4 UEFA
 Kenya 1984 1 0 0 1 0 1 -1 CAF
 North Korea 1959 18 9 4 5 24 15 +9 AFC
 South Korea 1978 27 1 10 16 18 36 -18 AFC
 Kuwait 1975 17 7 5 5 20 15 +5 AFC
 Kyrgyzstan 2009 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 AFC
 Laos 2011 2 2 0 0 13 3 +10 AFC
 Latvia 2010 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 UEFA
 Lebanon 1998 5 4 1 0 13 1 +12 AFC
 Macau 1978 5 5 0 0 22 2 +20 AFC
 Macedonia 2004 5 3 2 0 4 0 +4 UEFA
 Malaysia 1976 13 10 2 1 34 6 +28 AFC
 Maldives 2001 2 2 0 0 11 1 +10 AFC
 Mali 1966 2 1 0 1 5 3 +2 CAF
 Mexico 1987 3 0 0 3 2 7 -5 CONCACAF
 Morocco 1977 2 1 1 0 6 5 +1 CAF
 Myanmar 1957 8 6 0 2 27 4 +23 AFC
   Nepal 1972 1 1 0 0 6 2 +4 AFC
 Netherlands 1996 2 0 0 2 0 4 -4 UEFA
 New Zealand 1975 13 3 4 6 12 14 -2 OFC
 Norway 1992 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
 Oman 1998 5 3 0 2 10 4 +6 AFC
 Pakistan 1963 8 5 2 1 23 8 +15 AFC
 Palestine 2006 3 3 0 0 7 1 +6 AFC
 Papua New Guinea 1985 2 1 1 0 5 2 +3 OFC
 Paraguay 1996 2 0 1 1 1 3 -2 CONMEBOL
 Peru 1978 2 1 0 1 4 3 +1 CONMEBOL
 Philippines 1978 3 3 0 0 18 0 +18 AFC
 Poland 1984 2 0 0 2 0 2 -2 UEFA
 Portugal 2002 1 0 0 1 0 2 -2 UEFA
 Qatar 1978 14 6 4 4 19 13 +6 AFC
 Republic of Ireland 1984 2 0 0 2 0 2 -2 UEFA
 Romania 1984 2 0 0 2 2 5 -3 UEFA
 Saudi Arabia 1978 17 6 4 7 20 22 -2 AFC
 Senegal 1972 2 1 1 0 5 2 +3 CAF
 Serbia 2000 3 0 0 3 0 5 -5 UEFA
 Sierra Leone 1974 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 CAF
 Singapore 1984 12 10 2 0 30 6 +24 AFC
 Slovenia 2002 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 UEFA
 Somalia 1972 2 2 0 0 10 5 +5 CAF
 Soviet Union 1959 1 0 0 1 0 1 -1 UEFA
 Spain 2005 2 0 0 2 0 4 -4 UEFA
 Sri Lanka 1972 2 2 0 0 4 2 +2 AFC
 Sudan 1957 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 CAF
 Sweden 2001 3 0 1 2 2 6 -4 UEFA
 Switzerland 2006 1 0 0 1 1 4 -3 UEFA
 Syria 1966 9 6 1 2 21 7 +14 AFC
 Tajikistan 1997 4 3 1 0 8 1 +7 AFC
 Tanzania 1966 3 2 1 0 15 8 +7 CAF
 Thailand 1975 18 12 3 3 47 17 +30 AFC
 Trinidad and Tobago 2001 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 CONCACAF
 Turkey 2002 1 0 0 1 0 3 -3 UEFA
 Turkmenistan 1994 4 3 1 0 10 3 +7 AFC
 United Arab Emirates 1984 11 4 5 2 16 8 +8 AFC
 United States 1977 8 1 2 5 7 17 -10 CONCACAF
 Uruguay 1982 6 1 2 3 2 9 -7 CONMEBOL
 Uzbekistan 1994 9 3 1 5 11 15 -4 AFC
 Venezuela 1978 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CONMEBOL
 Vietnam 1997 6 6 0 0 20 3 +17 AFC
 Yemen 1988 4 2 1 1 5 1 +4 AFC
 Zambia 1972 1 0 1 0 3 3 0 CAF
 Zimbabwe 1997 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 CAF

Competition history[edit]