Chittaranjan Park

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Chittaranjan Park Kali Mandir, with shrines devoted to Shiva, Kali and Radhakrishna, built in 1984
Chittaranjan Park
neighbourhood
Chittaranjan Park is located in Delhi
Chittaranjan Park
Chittaranjan Park
Location in Delhi, India
Coordinates: 28°32′23″N 77°14′52″E / 28.539592°N 77.247699°E / 28.539592; 77.247699Coordinates: 28°32′23″N 77°14′52″E / 28.539592°N 77.247699°E / 28.539592; 77.247699
Country  India
State Delhi
District South Delhi
Metro New Delhi
Languages
 • Official Hindi
Time zone IST (UTC+5:30)
PIN 110 019
Planning agency Municipal Corporation of Delhi

Chittaranjan Park (Bengali: চিত্তরঞ্জন পার্ক), also known as C.R. Park, is an affluent neighborhood in South Delhi, and home to a large Bengali community. It was established in the early 1960s under the name EPDP Colony or East Pakistan Displaced Persons Colony, and later renamed after the deshbandhu (patriot) Chittaranjan Das in the 1980s.[1] Today, despite its growing cosmopolitan nature, it remains home to a large Bengali community, and is home to Kolkata-style street-food stalls, Bengali cuisine, fish markets, temples and cultural centers.[1]

History[edit]

In 1954, an association was formed for the inhabitants from East Bengal who were displaced from their homes in East Pakistan during the Partition of India and the associated Partition of Bengal (1947). A large group of government officers hailing from the erstwhile East Bengal migrated to Delhi and lobbied for a residential neighborhood. Leading roles were taken by Chandra Kumar Mukherjee,[1] Subodh Gopal Basumallik, Ashutosh Dutta, Bimal Bhusan Chakraborty, and the Chief Election Commissioner, Shyamaprasanna Senverma.[2] In the 1960s, land was assigned in a barren rocky area in the-then distant Southern areas. Members were required to provide some documentation of their residential status, and were required to be "already residing in Noida and gainfully employed in the capital"; based on this, 2147 people were given plots of land, initially on lease for 99 years, but subsequently converted into a freehold ownership.[3]

The original layout had the two-thousand odd plots, divided into eleven blocks A-K, along with a number of markets and cultural spaces. However, in the 1990s, 714 displaced families were accommodated among those who had not been able to meet the earlier deadline. This resulted in new blocks, called M, N, O, K-1, K-2, Pocket 40 (referred to as Navapalli), Pocket 52 (referred to as Dakhinpalli ) and Pocket-K. The main thoroughfare of the colony is Bipin Chandra Pal Marg. Institutions of note are a branch of the Raisina Bengali School, Kali Mandir (also called the Shiv Mandir), Bangiya Samaj and Chittaranjan Bhawan.[1]

Chittaranjan Park is bordered by Kalkaji, Greater Kailash I and II, Alaknanda and Govindpuri. It is adjacent to the business centre at Nehru Place.

Demographics[edit]

The colony was founded with plots going exclusively to migrants from East Bengal, but over time, the demographics has become a little more pan-Indian, though it continues to attract other Bengalis in general. With an estimated 2000 Bengali families (about 2/3ds), it has emerged as the most important outpost of Bengali culture in the capital. The explosive growth of South Delhi property prices and the aging of the original land allottees is resulting in an ongoing demographic diversification.[4]

Center of Bengali Culture in Delhi[edit]

The first big wave of Bengali settlers came when Calcutta and Delhi were first connected by train in 1864, thereafter with the shifting of capital to New Delhi in 1911, the shifting to government employees' followed logically. Initially employees from central government departments like Post and Telegraph, Government of India Press, Accountant General of Central Revenues (AGCR) and Railways were settled in Timarpur; thereafter in 1924, another phase of government housing came up near Gole Market, for employees of the Secretariat. Overtime many employees after retirement settled in Karol Bagh and WEA, and later in South Delhi.[5]

Chittaranjan Park however remains a major centre of Bengali cultural life in New Delhi, the best part is its evening life in the markets and on the streets people doing AddA - a favourite Bengali bhadralok pastime. The Durga Puja celebrations are renowned for their elaborate pandals and cultural functions. The major Durga Puja celebrations are B-Block, Kali Mandir, Co-operative Ground, Mela Ground, and Navapalli (Pocket 40). Auditoriums at Chittaranjan Bhawan and Bipin Pal Bhawan regularly host performances of Bengali theatre and music, which are also occasionally held in the Shiv/Kali Mandir. The week of Durga Puja sees performances by well-known artistes and troupes from West Bengal and Bangladesh as well as performances from group of local people residing at C.R. Park only.

Durga idol at Cooperative Park Puja, Durga Puja 2008

Chittaranjan Park is also home to one of the city's main markets for freshwater fish, an integral part of Bengali cuisine, a large Kali temple, several cultural centres, four big markets specialising in Bengali sweets and numerous stalls selling Calcutta-style street food - chops, cutlets, etc.

Most of the residents are eminent ex-government servants, scholars, professors, teachers and other professionals.

Notable residents[edit]

  • Ranjan Basu, Photographer
  • Torit Mitra, Artist, Theatre Director
  • Sandeep Bagchi, Actor
  • Sutapa Deb, TV Journalist
  • Ravi S Jha, Journalist
  • Prof. Subir Kumar Saha, Architect and Town Planner and Ex-Director of School of Planning & Architecture
  • Phoolan Devi
  • Swapan Dasgupta, journalist
  • Nitish Sengupta, sometime Member of Parliament
  • Saswati Sen, renowned Kathak dancer
  • Shantanu Moitra, Bollywood music director
  • Dr.Muktipada Chakraborty,Maha Acharya
  • Sudip Roy, Artist
  • Pratip Chaudhuri, Chairman of State Bank of India was a resident
  • Dilip Kumar Das, Artist
  • Pandit Debu Chaudhuri, noted sitarist, recipient of Padma Bhushan
  • Dr. Soumitra Dutta, IIT-ian, the first Asian and the first Indian dean of Johnson College of Cornell university
  • Shri Kunwan Narayan, Padma Bhushan awardee [6]
  • Dr. Pradip Kumar Bhaumik, IIT-ian, professor of IMI, New Delhi
  • Dr. Kalyan Bannerjee, homeopathic doctor, Padma Shri awardee
  • Paresh Maity,painter
  • Ar. Nilanjan Bhowal is a green architect of repute and is the recipient of the Gaurav Ratna award[citation needed] and Indian Institute of Architects' award for outstanding contribution in 2007. In 2011, he received the prestigious architect of the year award. He designed and executed, certified by TERI, India’s first five–star green home in H-Block C. R. Park which is a model for the whole country.[citation needed] [7]
  • Dr P P Bose, resident of I - 1611, CR park. Founder and president of the SAANS Foundation. A chest, critical care and sleep physician. Recipient of the Delhi Medical Association Excellence Award, Scroll of Honour from UCMS, Delhi University, for meritorious services. The SAANS foundation is listed as a top ten global foundation in sleep research and advocacy.[citation needed] [8]
  • Ankur, Professional Photographer
  • Manas Kamal Saha, Professional Caterer

Access[edit]

The Indira Gandhi International Airport is 17 km (domestic) and 23 km (international) from Chittaranjan Park. The New Delhi railway station is 16 km, and the Hazrat Nizamuddin Railway Station 9 km away. The Violet Line of the Delhi Metro has a stop at the Nehru Place station within 1 km from B-block in Chittaranjan Park.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Chittaranjan Park". Travel Delhi. Mobile Reference. 2007. ISBN 1-60501-051-0. 
  2. ^ http://epdpassociationcrpark.blogspot.com/2009/02/established-in-1954-and-registered.html
  3. ^ "Pin Code of Chittaranjan Park Delhi". citypincode.in. Retrieved 2014-03-09. 
  4. ^ Hiroshi Ishii; Katsuo Nawa (2007). Social Dynamics in Northern South Asia: Political and social transformations in north India and Nepal. Manohar. p. 311. ISBN 81-7304-729-4. 
  5. ^ "From Bengal, but staunchly Delhiites". Hindustan Times. July 6, 2011. 
  6. ^ http://crpark.communitysamvada.com/index.php?option=com_residentnews&view=detail&id=39
  7. ^ http://www.grihaindia.org/events/tgs2014/gallery.php
  8. ^ http://www.saansfoundationindia.com

CR Parks Local Community Website www.crpark.communitysamvada.com

External links[edit]