Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz

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Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz (born 1933) is an American artist and art educator; her paintings depict her memories of a childhood during the Japanese American internment.

Early life and education[edit]

Chizuko Judy Sugita was born in Orange, California, the youngest of nine children; her mother died from complications soon after Chizuko's birth. Her Hiroshima-born father owned a nursery.[1] In 1942, her family was sent to Poston War Relocation Center in Arizona, as part of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. They were released from Poston when Chizuko was twelve. After the war, she returned to Southern California with her father, and settled in Huntington Beach.[2][3]

Chizuko Judy Sugita earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from California State University, Dominguez Hills.[4] In 1953, she was chosen as Nisei Week Queen.[5][6]

Career[edit]

Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz worked as an art teacher at Palos Verdes High School, and served as chair of the school's art department.[7] After early retirement following a workplace injury, she turned to watercolor painting full-time, and took up her childhood memories of camp life as her theme.[8][9] Her illustrated memoir, Camp Days, 1942-1945, was published in 2004, with an introduction by George Takei.[10]

An exhibit of her watercolors about her childhood in Poston, "Camp Days, 1942-1945," was first shown at the Palos Verdes Art Center near her home, in 2009.[11] It has since appeared at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (in 2010-11). [12] She lectures on her life and work, saying "This is what I wanted to leave for my grandchildren, I wanted them to know what their parents and family went through."[13]

Montez Productions made a film of her story, "Childhood Memories of Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz," in 2011.[14] Her art also appears in the documentary "Heart Mountain: An All-American Town," by Raechel Donahue.[15]

Personal life[edit]

Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz is married to Richard de Queiroz.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The World War II Experience of Orange County Nikkei in History and Memory," Cultural News (October 2011).
  2. ^ Theresa Walker, "Artist Spent Part of Youth in Relocation Camp," Orange County Register (August 13, 2010).
  3. ^ Rebecca Villaneda, "Exhibit Explores the Japanese-American Experience: Artist Paints the Colors of an Internment Camp," Peninsula News (February 12, 2009).
  4. ^ Rebecca Villaneda, "Exhibit Explores the Japanese-American Experience: Artist Paints the Colors of an Internment Camp," Peninsula News (February 12, 2009).
  5. ^ "Photographs of Nisei Week Queens Through the Years," KCET.org .
  6. ^ "Queens Reunion 2013," Rafu Shimpo (August 23, 2013).
  7. ^ Barbara Baird, "Injured Teacher Pained by Suspension," Los Angeles Times (May 12, 1989).
  8. ^ Erin Yasuda Soto, "Artist Shares Camp Memories in Japanese American Museum of SJ Exhibit," Nichi Bei (November 2010).
  9. ^ Brett Esaki, "Japanese American Artists," in Jonathan H. X. Lee and Kathleen M. Nadeau, eds., Encyclopedia of Asian American Folklore and Folklife (ABC-CLIO 2011): 611.
  10. ^ Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz, Camp Days, 1942-1945 (Edinger Printing 2004).
  11. ^ Bondo Wyszpolski, "Rendition Then and Now," Easy Reader (February 12, 2009).
  12. ^ "'Camp Days' Exhibit Closes Dec. 30," Rafu Shimpo (November 18, 2011).
  13. ^ Steven Cabana, "Colorful Recollection: Painful Memories of Camp and Fading History the Inspiration for Artist's Haunting Memories," La Voz Weekly (March 5, 2007).
  14. ^ Camp Days, 1942-1945: Childhood Memories of Chizuko Judy Sugita de Queiroz (Montez Productions 2011).
  15. ^ "Heart Mountain Documentary," Rafu Shimpo (May 30, 2012).
  16. ^ "Queens Reunion 2013," Rafu Shimpo (August 23, 2013).

External links[edit]