Chopper bicycle

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A chopper bicycle is a highly customized bicycle whose design, construction and style is similar to that of a chopper-style motorcycle.

About[edit]

A custom build Chopper bicycle

While the term "chopper" is generally used to describe a motorcycle or bicycle that has had some of its original parts replaced with custom parts, today's definition has grown to include custom motorcycles and bicycles that are low to the ground, usually with extended forks creating a long front end. Even as commercial interests are taking note of the popularity of choppers and expanding their lines,[1] most riders of choppers have hand built choppers and encourage others to make their own.[2] Arguably, a bought 'chopper' is not a 'chopper' at all, because no chopping was done—only a commercial transaction.[3]

There are various cycling groups and clubs around the world that feature chopper bicycle riders such as the Choppercabras, Chopaderos, Freakbike Militia, SCUL, and C.h.u.n.k. 666, . Such groups encourage all chopper bicycle riders to join them on rides celebrating different events and holidays.

Because the frame of a chopper bicycle and a chopper motorcycle can be strikingly similar, and of a high enough quality/durability, it is relatively common to have an empty space, or 'engine bay', in the frame, in which a motor can be inserted into the frame at a later date, among other tweaks and conversions. Depending on the quality of strength of the frame, and the engines size and output, this can result in blurring between the classifications of bicycle, moped, and/ or motorcycle. Legal laws and statutes may vary in your local state or territory.

The designer who created the revolutionary Raleigh Chopper bicycle, which became a symbol of the 1970s, has died of cancer aged 85.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corporate example: [1], PhatCycles, June 9, 2010
  2. ^ Gould, Nemo. "Chopper bicycle made from found materials", instructables.com, June 24, 2007. Accessed June 9, 2010.
  3. ^ Tucker, Karen Iris "Tall-bike clubs live free, ride high, and don't want your stinking logo", Village Voice, Mar 14, 2006. Accessed Jun 9, 2010.

External links[edit]