Chourst

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Chourst
Game background
Title(s) The Unpredictable
Lord of Randomness
Home plane Limbo
Power level Slaad lord
Alignment Chaotic Neutral
Portfolio Randomness
Design details

Chourst the Unpredictable is the slaad Lord of Randomness, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Creative origins[edit]

Chourst was created by Ed Bonny.

Publication history[edit]

Chourst appeared in second edition in Dragon #221 (September 1995).[1]

Description[edit]

Chourst appears as a gangly, 20' tall chalk-white slaad; his other forms are unknown. Chourst cares for nothing but himself. Independent, impulsive, erratic, and totally self-absorbed, Chourst does whatever he wishes from moment to moment. Chourst enjoys relaxing in the primordial soup of Limbo, as if soothing away cares that he does not really have. Chourst does not make plans and is not interested in anything beyond his momentary desires. Anything that requires more than a few minutes of his attention is not worth exploring.

Relationships[edit]

Although Ygorl approves of the chaos and entropy Chourst wreaks, Chourst has made many enemies, especially among the githzerai who frequently fall on the receiving end of his antics. Chourst's inquisitiveness once drove him to visit Mechanus, although he barely survived the encounter; Primus himself showed up to deal with the slaad after he had worked enough mayhem and disorder on the orderly plane, and still seeks justice against Chourst.

Realm[edit]

Chourst has no residence, home base, or even any temporary domicile; he feels at home wherever he goes.

Dogma[edit]

Chourst has no particular dogma; he only wishes to indulge himself whenever and wherever possible. One moment he may be tearing a githzerai to pieces, and the next he may stop suddenly to sniff a pretty flower that caught his fancy.

Worshipers[edit]

Although Chourst has no desire for followers or resources, members of the Xaositects (Planar Handbook, 60) admire Chourst’s dedication to chaotic ideals, but still give him a wide berth.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonny, Edward. "The Dragon's Bestiary: Lords of Chaos." Dragon #221 (TSR, 1995)

Additional reading[edit]