Chris Hackett (artist)

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Chris Hackett
Stuck with Hackett.jpg
Chris Hackett
Born (1972-04-15) April 15, 1972 (age 43)
Occupation artist, television presenter, writer, fabricator, instructor

Chris Hackett, born April 15, 1972 in New York City, is an artist, television presenter, writer, fabricator, alternative engineer, and instructor. He is a co-founder of the Madagascar Institute, an art combine located in Brooklyn, NY.[1] contributing editor for Popular Science Magazine,[2] and was the host of the Science Channel's television show Stuck with Hackett. A 2012 New York Times article, entitled "Building a better apocalypse",[3] described him as "something like a fabricator in chief for the Kings County D.I.Y. art set."

The Madagascar Institute[edit]

In 1998, Chris Hackett founded the Madagascar Institute with colleagues Ryan O'Connor and Eric Singer.[4] The Madagascar Institute is an affiliation of artists headquartered near the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York. Members of the group include builders, artists, and designers who specialize in salvaging abandoned parts and using them in mechanized art pieces,[5] large scale sculptures and rides,[6] live performances,[7] and guerilla art events. The Madagascar Institute also offers classes in welding and other art and building techniques.[8]

Television and Film[edit]

Junkyard Wars[edit]

Between 2002 and 2004, Hackett appeared on TLC's Junkyard Wars.[9] The show, which was the American version of the UK show Scrapheap Challenge, gave teams 12 hours to gather materials from a junkyard, then use the materials to modify their vehicles for a race. Hackett acted as the Red Team Captain.

B.I.K.E.[edit]

In 2005, Hackett appeared in the documentary B.I.K.E.[10] The film was directed by Anthony Howard and Jacob Septimus. They spent over two years following an underground bike club known as the Black Label Bicycle Club to their meetings, parties, gatherings of the tribes in Amsterdam and Minneapolis, and the protests of the 2004 Republican National Convention and filmed it all.

Breaking Point[edit]

In early 2010, he appeared on the Discovery Channel Canada show Breaking Point[11] alongside Jonathan Tippett.[12] The show premiered Monday, January 18, 2010 and was six episodes long. In each episode the guys would investigate the limits of large scale every day objects, such as armored limos, lobster boats, fuel tankers, buses, and more. Hackett and Tippett would conduct extreme tests on one of theses objects until they found its breaking point. Then they would come up with ways to make the object safer and stronger.

Stuck with Hackett[edit]

Was created and produced by Silver Machine. Hackett was the star and host of the Science Channel's Stuck with Hackett.[13] The show aired on August 18, 2011 as a nine part series, and could be watched on Thursdays at 10:30 pm on the Science Channel. Each episode took place in a different abandoned location ( rail yard, log cabin, grocery store dumpster, abandoned hospital,...and so on ). Hackett would turn the every day trash or "obtainium" as he calls it that was left in the location into unexpected, functioning machines or mechanisms.

Author Credits[edit]

Popular Science[edit]

Hackett writes a regular column for Popular Science[14] in which he tackles problems with DIY engineering.

The Big Book of Maker Skills[edit]

Hackett's first book, The Big Book of Maker Skills: 334 Tools & Techniques for Building Great Tech Projects[15] was published by Weldon Owen in November 2014.

References[edit]