Chris Hartcher

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The Honourable
Chris Hartcher
MP
Chris Hartcher 03-03-2010.jpg
Minister for Resources and Energy
In office
3 April 2011 – 4 December 2013
Premier Barry O'Farrell
Preceded by Paul Lynch
Succeeded by Anthony Roberts
Special Minister of State
In office
3 April 2011 – 4 December 2013
Preceded by Eric Roozendaal
Succeeded by Anthony Roberts
Minister for the Central Coast
In office
3 April 2011 – 4 December 2013
Preceded by John Robertson
Succeeded by Michael Gallacher
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Terrigal
Incumbent
Assumed office
24 March 2007
Preceded by New district
Majority 24.1% (2011)
Personal details
Born (1946-12-21) 21 December 1946 (age 67)
North Sydney, Australia
Political party Independent (politics)
Other political
affiliations
Liberal Party of Australia (1988–2013)
Residence Wamberal, New South Wales
Profession Solicitor[1]
Website Parliamentary webpage

Christopher "Chris" Peter Hartcher MP (born 21 December 1946) is an Australian politician, a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly representing Terrigal as an Independent since 2013 and for the Liberal Party from 2007 to 2013, and has previously represented Gosford between 1988 and 2007.[2] He was the New South Wales Minister for Resources and Energy, Special Minister of State and Minister for the Central Coast in the O'Farrell-Stoner Liberal/National coalitition government from 2011 to 2013.

Early life[edit]

Hartcher was born in North Sydney and was educated at Saint Ignatius' College, Riverview.[3] He received a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Sydney. He then worked as a personal injury and family law solicitor employed by his uncle.

Political career[edit]

Hartcher was elected to represent Gosford for the Liberal Party at the 1988 NSW state election. He was appointed Government Whip in 1991 and served in that role until 1992.[2] On 3 July 1992, Hartcher was appointed to the NSW Cabinet as Minister for the Environment and left the Cabinet with the defeat of the Fahey Government in March 1995.[2]

NSW Opposition[edit]

After the 1995 election, Hartcher was appointed to a number of Shadow Ministerial portfolios spending a combined 7 years as Shadow Minister for Industrial Relations and 4 years as Shadow Attorney General.

On 28 March 2002 he was elected as Deputy Opposition Leader under John Brogden until the 2003 State Election.[2] Former Premier Bob Carr was often Hartcher's political "sparring partner"; a relationship Carr referred to as "good natured fun".[4] Carr nicknamed Hartcher the The Swamp Fox – an irreverent reference to US War of Independence guerrilla commander, Francis Marion – to suggest Hartcher would challenge Brogden for leadership of the party.[5]

At the 2003 election Hartcher was challenged in the seat of Gosford by Labor candidate Deborah O'Neill and won by only 272 votes.[6] In 2006, New South Wales Legislative Assembly seats were subject to an electoral redistribution. The seat of Peats was abolished and the majority of the area was redistributed into a newly created seat of Gosford. The majority of the former seat of Gosford was redistributed into the new electoral district of Terrigal. Hartcher was again challenged by O'Neill but was elected Member for Terrigal on 24 March 2007. O'Neill was later elected as the Member for Robertson at the 2010 Federal Election.

In 2010, Hartcher was endorsed as the Liberal Party's candidate for Terrigal ahead of the 2011 election. Hartcher was re-elected as the Member for Terrigal with a swing of 11.1 per cent and won the seat with 74.1 per cent of the vote on a two party preferred basis.[7] His main opponent was Labor's Trevor Drake.

O'Farrell Government[edit]

On 3 April 2011, Hartcher was appointed by Premier Barry O'Farrell to the Cabinet as Minister for Resources and Energy, Special Minister of State and Minister for the Central Coast.[8]

He resigned from Cabinet on 4 December 2013 after the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) raided his office.[9][10] In February 2014, the ICAC commenced investigating allegations of corrupt conduct.[11] In response to the inquiry, the Liberal partyroom began the process of suspending Hartcher, Chris Spence, and Darren Webber from the parliamentary party, even though they had just renominated for their seats. Before this process began, the three MPs resigned from the Liberal Party to sit as independents.[12]

Personal life[edit]

He is married with three sons.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Chris Hartcher". Chris Hartcher. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Mr (Chris) Christopher Peter Hartcher, MP". Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 
  3. ^ "Motor Accident Compensation Amebdnebt (Terrorism) Bill". Hansard. Parliament of New South Wales. 12 November 2003. 
  4. ^ "Carr defends Lib leadership taunts". ABC News (Australia). 15 March 2011. 
  5. ^ "Questions Without Notice: Malabar Police Station". Hansard. Parliament of New South Wales. 3 April 2001. p. 13019. Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "Terrigal – NSW 2011". The Tally Room: Elections and politics in Australia and around the world. Ben Raue. 2011. Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  7. ^ Green, Antony (5 April 2011). "Terrigal". NSW Votes 2011 (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  8. ^ "New faces in Barry O'Farrell's Cabinet". The Australian. AAP. 3 April 2011. Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  9. ^ "Chris Hartcher resigns from NSW cabinet over ICAC inquiry". Sydney Morning Herald. 4 December 2013. 
  10. ^ "Energy Minister Chris Hartcher resigns after ICAC raid on his offices". Daily Telegraph. 4 December 2013. 
  11. ^ "Public notice". NSW members of parliament – corruption allegations concerning soliciting, receiving and concealing payments - (Operation Spicer). Independent Commission Against Corruption. 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  12. ^ Chris Hartcher, Darren Webber and Chris Spence step down from Liberal Party amid corruption claims. ABC News, 2014-02-19.

External links[edit]

Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Brian McGowan
Member for Gosford
1988–2007
Succeeded by
Marie Andrews
New district Member for Terrigal
2007–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Bruce Baird
Minister for the Environment
1992–95
Succeeded by
Pamela Allan
Preceded by
Paul Lynch
Minister for Resources and Energy
2011–13
Succeeded by
Anthony Roberts
Preceded by
Eric Roozendaal
Special Minister of State
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Anthony Roberts
Preceded by
John Robertson
Minister for the Central Coast
2011–13
Succeeded by
Michael Gallacher
Party political offices
Preceded by
Barry O'Farrell
Deputy Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party
2002–03
Succeeded by
Barry O'Farrell