Chris Kreski

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Chris Kreski (July 31, 1962 – May 9, 2005) was an American writer, biographer and screenwriter.

Writing[edit]

In 1989, during his tenure as the head writer for Remote Control, Kreski met actor Barry Williams, who was one of three celebrity contestants during a "Brady Day" episode. When Williams said that he'd thought about writing a biography, Kreski struck up a partnership. The resulting book, Growing Up Brady: I Was A Teenage Greg sold more than 300,000 copies and established Kreski as an "as told to" celebrity writer. Kreski went on to co-write three best-selling autobiographies with William Shatner, and one with baseball pitcher David Wells.

MTV[edit]

Kreski was associated with MTV Networks for over 15 years, and was a writer and consultant for many of its high-profile series and specials, such as Remote Control, Beavis and Butt-Head, Celebrity Deathmatch, and the channel's annual movie and video music awards shows. He was responsible for many of the channel's distinctive in-house promotional spots during the early 1990s. Kreski was also a head writer of The Daily Show, and for the World Wrestling Federation's television programs.

In 1991, he appeared in an MTV promotional spot as "Senator Kreski." The spot, a parody of political attack ads, showed still photographs of Kreski, alternately beaming and grimacing, as the announcer accused Senator Kreski of various shortcomings:

  • "Senator Kreski promised he would lower your taxes. Senator Kreski lied. Senator Kreski promised he would fix your schools. Senator Kreski lied. Senator Kreski promised to replace the national anthem with Bell Biv Devoe's "Do Me!" Senator Kreski lied."

The ad ended with a panicked, shifty-eyed Kreski fleeing from the photographer, into a Times Square porno shop.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Williams, Barry and Kreski, Chris (1992) Growing Up Brady
  • Shatner, William and Kreski, Chris (1993) Star Trek Memories
  • Shatner, William and Kreski, Chris (1994) Star Trek Movie Memories
  • Kreski, Chris (1998) Life Lessons from Xena, Warrior Princess
  • Shatner, William and Kreski, Chris (1999) Get A Life!
  • Wells, David and Kreski, Chris (2004) Perfect I'm Not

Professional wrestling[edit]

Following the departure of his predecessor, Vince Russo, in October 1999, Kreski became the head writer of the World Wrestling Federation. He is widely credited with writing captivating and layered storylines, and was at the helm of WWF creative in its all-time peak years of both ratings and profitability. Kreski's extensive use of storyboards was mocked by many in the WWF during his tenure, but they enabled him to achieve a high degree of continuity in his storylines, which began to devolve into semi-coherence following his departure.

Kreski was replaced as head writer by Stephanie McMahon in November 2000, but remained with the company until 2002, when he left to pursue other opportunities.

Death[edit]

Kreski died of cancer in 2005.

External links[edit]