Chris Pikula

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Christopher Pikula
Residence New York[1]
Nationality American
Pro Tour debut 1996 Pro Tour — New York
Winnings US$39,910[2]
Pro Tour wins (Top 8) 0 (3)[3]
Grand Prix wins (Top 8) 0 (4)[4]
Lifetime Pro Points 133[1]
Planeswalker Level 43 (Battlemage)

Christopher Pikula is an American Magic: The Gathering player. Pikula started playing on the Pro Tour at the very first Pro Tour in New York, 1996. He attended the other two Pro Tour events that season, too, failing to attend only the World Championship. Success came at the beginning of the second season, when Pikula reached consecutive Pro Tour Top 8s. In the 1997–98 season he had another Top 8 appearance, this time at the World Championship. Afterwards he reached the Top 8s of two Grand Prix events, but gradually disappeared from the pro scene.

Pikula is best known for creating the Magic card Meddling Mage, his reward for winning the 2000 Magic Invitational.[5] In the 2005 season had a small comeback where he reached the Top 8 of another two Grand Prix events. Pikula has attended the occasional Grand Prix since, but has not made another finals appearance.[1]

Achievements[edit]

Season Event type Location Format Date Rank
1996–97 Pro Tour Atlanta Sealed Deck 15–17 September 1996 7
1996–97 Pro Tour Dallas Standard 22–24 November 1996 4
1997–98 Worlds Seattle Special 12–16 August 1998 6
1998–99 Invitational Barcelona Special 4–7 February 1999 3
1998–99 Grand Prix Kansas City Extended 27–28 March 1999 2
1998–99 Grand Prix Washington D.C. Sealed and Booster Draft 19–20 June 1999 2
1999–00 Invitational Kuala Lumpur Special 2–5 March 2000 1
2000–01 Invitational Sydney Special 16–19 November 2000 6
2001–02 Invitational Cape Town Special 5–7 October 2001 6
2005 Grand Prix Chicago Team Limited 18–19 December 2004 3
2005 Grand Prix Philadelphia Legacy 12–13 November 2005 2

Last updated: 2 February 2010
Source: Wizards.com

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "DCI & RPGA Rankings and Ratings". The DCI. 27 January 2010. Retrieved 2 February 2010. 
  2. ^ "Life Time Winnings Leaders". Wizards of the Coast. 4 April 2006. Retrieved 2 February. 
  3. ^ "Lifetime Pro Tour Top 8s". Wizards of the Coast. 24 November 2010. Retrieved 2 February 2010. 
  4. ^ "Lifetime Grand Prix Top 8s". Wizards of the Coast. 24 November 2010. Retrieved 2 February 2010. 
  5. ^ Rosewater, Mark (10 May 2004). "All-Star Studded". Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved 2 February 2010. 
Preceded by
United States Mike Long
Magic Invitational Champion
1999
Succeeded by
United States Jon Finkel