Christian-Democratic Movement (Georgia)

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Christian-Democratic Movement
ქრისტიანულ-დემოკრატიული მოძრაობა
Leader Giorgi Targamadze
Founded 2008
Ideology Christian democracy
Conservatism
Social conservatism
Political position Centre-right
International affiliation International Democrat Union
European affiliation Alliance of European Conservatives and Reformists
European Christian Political Movement
Colours Maroon and gold
Seats in Parliament
0 / 150
Website
www.cdm.ge
Politics of Georgia
Political parties
Elections

The Christian-Democratic Movement (Georgian: ქრისტიანულ-დემოკრატიული მოძრაობა, k’ristianul-demokratiuli modzraoba, KDM) is a political party in Georgia, founded in February 2008 and led by Giorgi Targamadze, formerly an Imedi TV anchor who had once been a Member of the Parliament of Georgia and a close ally of Aslan Abashidze, then a regional leader of Adjara. Former Imedi TV journalists Magda Anikashvili and Giorgi Akhvlediani and former Imedi producer Levan Vepkhvadze, all of whom left the station in January 2008, and one of the leading figures in the party Nika Laliashvili also joined the party.

Among its policies is a commitment to making Orthodox Christianity the state religion of Georgia.[1]

At the May 21, 2008 Georgian legislative election, the party was one of several opposition parties to gain seats in Parliament. However the opposition parties as a whole had such small representation, after elections they considered rigged, that almost all the elected MPs renounced their mandates. The Christian Democrat members however chose to retain their seats, and the party became the main opposition to the ruling United National Movement in Parliament, often referred to as the "Parliamentary Opposition."

The party joined the Alliance of European Conservatives and Reformists in August 2012.

The heavily polarized October 2012 Legislative election resulted in the third place for the party, but a mere 2.05% of the votes was not enough to get any of its candidates to the parliament, and the party lost all its six seats.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ex-TV Anchor Sets Up Political Party.". Civil Georgia. 2007. 

External links[edit]