Christian II, Elector of Saxony

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Christian II
Kurfürst Christian II. von Sachsen (Porträt).jpg
Elector of Saxony
Reign 25 September 1591 – 23 June 1611
Predecessor Christian I
Successor John George I
Regent Frederick William I, Duke of Saxe-Weimar
Spouse Hedwig of Denmark
House House of Wettin
Father Christian I, Elector of Saxony
Mother Sophie of Brandenburg
Born (1583-09-23)23 September 1583
Dresden
Died 23 June 1611(1611-06-23) (aged 27)
Dresden
Religion Lutheranism

Christian II of Saxony (23 September 1583 – 23 June 1611)[1] was Elector of Saxony from 1591 to 1611.[2]

He was born in Dresden, the eldest son of Christian I of Saxony and Sophie of Brandenburg. He belonged to the Albertine line of the House of Wettin.

Christian succeeded his father as Elector of Saxony in 1591 at the age of eight. Because of his youth, his kinsman, Duke Frederick William I of Saxe-Weimar, assumed the regency of the Electorate until 1601, when Christian was declared an adult and began to govern.

In the course of the event that eventually led to the Thirty Years' War, his refusal to join the Union of Auhausen deepened the division between the Protestant German states.

In Dresden, on September 12, 1602, Christian married Hedwig, daughter of the King Frederick II of Denmark.[3] This marriage was childless. He died in Dresden in 1611.

Having left no issue, on his death his brother John George succeeded him as Elector.[4]

Ancestry[edit]

Christian II, Elector of Saxony
Born: 23 September 1583 Died: 23 June 1611
Preceded by
Christian I
Elector of Saxony
1591–1611
Succeeded by
John George I

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kolb, Robert, ed. Lutheran Ecclesiastical Culture, 1550-1675. Leiden, Netherlands: Koninklijke, 2008. 513.
  2. ^ Schuckelt, Holger. "Relations between Saxony and the Crimean Tatars in the 17th and Early 18th Centuries." In Islamic Art and Architecture in the European Periphery: Crimea, Caucasus, and the Volga-Ural Region. Edited by Barbara Kellner-Heinkele, Joachim Gierlichs, & Brigitte Heuer. Germany: Deutsche Morgenlaendische Gesellschaft, 2008. 95.
  3. ^ Johannsen, Hugo. "The Writ on the Wall: Theological and Political Aspects of Biblical Text-Cycles in Evangelical Palace Chapels of the Renaissance." In The Arts and the Cultural Heritage of Martin Luther. Edited by Nils Holger Petersen. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2002. 83.
  4. ^ Kamen, Henry. Who's Who in Europe, 1450-1750. London: Routledge, 2000. 161.