Christian Messenger

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Christian Messenger
Editor Barton W. Stone
Categories Restoration Movement
Frequency Monthly
First issue November 1826
Final issue April 1845
Country United States
Language English

The Christian Messenger a religious magazine established by the early Restoration Movement leader Barton W. Stone in 1826.[1][2] The paper was a key means communication for Christians lead by Stone and a primary source of unity in the movement, but consistently struggled for survival.[1] It played a key role in promoting the merger of the Christians lead by Stone with the Disciples of Christ led by Thomas and Alexander Campbell.[1]

History[edit]

Barton W. Stone

From the beginning of the movement, the free exchange of ideas among the people was fostered by the journals published by its leaders. Alexander Campbell published The Christian Baptist and The Millennial Harbinger while Stone published The Christian Messenger.[3]:208 The first issue was printed in November 1826, and early themes included opposition to sectarianism, Christian liberty, and the right of individual Christians to read and interpret the Bible for themselves independently of any creeds.[1] Stone also stressed the need for Christian unity based on the New Testament alone.[1] The cornerstone for the Stone movement was Christian freedom, which led them to a rejection of all the historical creeds, traditions and theological systems that had developed over time and a focus on a primitive Christianity based on the Bible.[4]:104,105

During the period from 1831 through 1834 the Messenger actively promoted the union with the Disciples of Christ (Campbell Movement).[1] Stone also used the Messenger to encourage Christians to free their slaves and support the American Colonization Society.[1][5]:717-718

The Messenger had several co-editors over the time it was published, including John T. Johnson, Jacob Creath, Jr., T.M. Allen and D.P. Henderson.[1] After Stone died Henderson continued the paper for a few months, after which it was merged with The Bible Advocate in 1847.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Douglas Allen Foster and Anthony L. Dunnavant, The Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Christian Churches/Churches of Christ, Churches of Christ, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2004, ISBN 0-8028-3898-7, ISBN 978-0-8028-3898-8, 854 pages, entry on Christian Messenger, pp. 194-195
  2. ^ Douglas Allen Foster and Anthony L. Dunnavant, The Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Christian Churches/Churches of Christ, Churches of Christ, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2004, ISBN 0-8028-3898-7, ISBN 978-0-8028-3898-8, 854 pages, entry on Journalism, pp. 435-438
  3. ^ Garrison, Winfred Earnest and DeGroot, Alfred T. (1948). The Disciples of Christ, A History, St Louis, Missouri: The Bethany Press
  4. ^ C. Leonard Allen and Richard T. Hughes, Discovering Our Roots: The Ancestry of the Churches of Christ, Abilene Christian University Press, 1988, ISBN 0-89112-006-8
  5. ^ Douglas Allen Foster and Anthony L. Dunnavant, The Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Christian Churches/Churches of Christ, Churches of Christ, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2004, ISBN 0-8028-3898-7, ISBN 978-0-8028-3898-8, 854 pages, entry on Stone, Barton Warren, pp. 700-720