Christian pilgrimage

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The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), is the pilgrimage to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela where legend has it that the remains of the apostle, Saint James the Great. The route was declared the first European Cultural Route by the Council of Europe in October 1987; it was also named one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites in 1993.

A Christian pilgrimage is a pilgrimage or journey made by Christians to places which has to them a moral or spiritual significance. The first pilgrimages were made to sites connected with the ministry of Jesus. Aside from the early example of Origen, who "in search of the traces of Jesus, the disciples and the prophets",[1] already found local folk prompt to show him the actual location of the Gadarene swine in the mid-3rd century, surviving descriptions of Christian pilgrimages to the Holy Land and Jerusalem date from the 4th century. The Itinerarium Burdigalense ("Bordeaux Itinerary"), the oldest surviving Christian itinerarium, was written by the anonymous "Pilgrim of Bordeaux" recounting the stages of a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in the years 333 and 334.[2] Pilgrimage was encouraged by church fathers like Saint Jerome and established by Helena, the mother of Constantine the Great. Pilgrimages also began to be made to Rome and other sites associated with the Apostles, Saints and Christian martyrs, as well as to places where there have been apparitions of the Virgin Mary.

Under the Ottoman Empire travel in Palestine was restricted and dangerous. Modern pilgrimages in the Holy Land may be said to have received an early impetus from the scholar Ernest Renan, whose twenty-four days in Palestine, recounted in his Vie de Jésus (published 1863) found the resonance of the New Testament at every turn.

Christian pilgrimage sites[edit]

Belgium[edit]

  • Banneux - Apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary in 1933 [1]
  • Beauraing - Apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary in 1932 [2].

Bosnia-Herzegovina[edit]

The hill of apparitions in Medjugorje, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
  • Međugorje - Apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary from 1981 up to the present time.

Brazil[edit]

Bulgaria[edit]

France[edit]

Germany[edit]

Hungary[edit]

Ireland[edit]

  • Croagh Patrick - Mountain sacred to Ireland's national saint, Saint Patrick. Reek Sunday, an annual ascent of the mountain, attracts between 15,000 and 30,000 pilgrims.
  • Knock - shrine in County Mayo which attracts thousands of pilgrims every year. Site of Marian apparition.

Israel[edit]

The Holy Land, location of many events in the Old Testament and New Testament:

Italy[edit]

St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City

Jordan[edit]

The pilgrimage of Žemaičių Kalvarija in Lithuania is one of the most important pilgrimages for Catholics.

There are five official Christian pilgrimage sites in Jordan certified by the Holy See.[4]

Mexico[edit]

  • Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe - one of the largest churches in the world and receives about 20 million pilgrims per year. It can accommodate 40,000 people for a mass.

Poland[edit]

Some European pilgrims on the ancient pilgrimage road to Santiago de Compostela in 2005.

Portugal[edit]

Serbia[edit]

Spain[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Other pilgrimage sites[edit]

Armenia[edit]

Croagh Patrick chappel, Ireland

Austria[edit]

  • Mariazell. Marian Shrine to Austria and Hungary

Canada[edit]

Costa Rica[edit]

Czech[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Finland[edit]

  • Kirkkokari, the only Roman Catholic pilgrimage site in Finland.

France[edit]

Germany[edit]

Greece[edit]

India[edit]

Indonesia[edit]

  • Sendangsono. Central Java; The first native java baptized by Rv. Van Lith, SJ

Ireland[edit]

Italy[edit]

Japan[edit]

Lithuania[edit]

Malaysia[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

Norway[edit]

  • Nidaros, Trondheim. Shrine of St. Olav. 4th most visited pilgrimage site in Middle Ages.

Philippines[edit]

Poland[edit]

Romania[edit]

  • Iași, Moldavia. 14 October is the most important day for Orthodox Christians, Saint Parascheva's Day. Over 1 million pilgrims from all over Romania and neighboring Orthodox countries queue to touch the Holy Relic.
  • Miercurea Ciuc, Transylvania. Whit Sunday gathering of (mostly ethnic Hungarian) Catholics.

Slovakia[edit]

Spain[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

Syria[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Pilgrims on their way to the shrine of St. Thomas Becket, Canterbury Cathedral.

UK[edit]

USA[edit]

Record-breaking pilgrimages[edit]

World Youth Day is a major Catholic Pilgrimage, specifically for people aged 16–35. It is held internationally every 2–3 years. In 2005, it was held in Cologne, Germany. In 1995, the largest gathering of all time was to World Youth Day in Manila, Philippines, where four million people from all over the world attended.[8]

In the media both manifestations are usually referred to as 'pilgrimages', but actually in the strict meaning of the word they are not pilgrimages as they are (each time) once-only religious gatherings for a specific purpose (funeral, religious renewal for the youth) and not focused at a shrine based cultus-object for veneration. However, since the funeral, the proper grave of John Paul II is actually indeed becoming a new site of pilgrimage in Rome.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quoted in Robin Lane Fox, The Unauthorized Version, 1992:235.
  2. ^ General context of early Christian pilgrimage is provided by E.D. Hunt, Holy Land Pilgrimage in the Late Roman Empire AD 312-460 1982.
  3. ^ Mariapocsi-zarandokhaz.ur
  4. ^ http://www.visitjordan.com/default.aspx?tabid=175
  5. ^ Notre-Dame du Sacré-Coeur
  6. ^ House of the Virgin Mary listing at www.Ephesus.US
  7. ^ Basilica and National Shrine of Our Lady of Consolation official website
  8. ^ "World Youth Day". Retrieved 10 March 2011. 

External links[edit]