Christopher Mabee

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Christopher Mabee
Christopher Mabee - 2006 Skate America.jpg
Mabee competes in 2006.
Personal information
Full name Christopher Mabee
Country represented  Canada
Born (1985-08-26) August 26, 1985 (age 29)
Tillsonburg, Ontario
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Former coach Lee Barkell
Doug Leigh
Doug Haw
H. Hayward
S. Ball
Paul Wirtz
Former choreographer David Wilson
Lori Nichol
Skating club Tillsonburg SC
Retired December 10, 2008
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 198.69
2006 4CC
Short program 71.33
2007 Worlds
Free skate 130.56
2006 4CC

Christopher Mabee (born on August 26, 1985 in Tillsonburg, Ontario) is a Canadian retired competitive figure skater. He is the 2007 Canadian national silver medalist. He announced his retirement from competitive skating in December, 2008.[1]

Early career[edit]

Christopher Mabee was born in Tillsonburg, Ontario. He began skating at age seven. Mabee was coached by Paul Wirtz for a year in Montreal, but after being injured in 1998, he moved back home to be closer to his family.[2] Mabee then trained at the Mariposa School of Skating in Barrie, Ontario, under Lee Barkell and Doug Leigh.

Mabee won the silver medal on the novice level at nationals in 1998. He was sent to the Triglav Trophy that year and placed 5th on the novice level. Mabee went junior the next season and placed 4th at nationals in 1999. In the 1999-2000 season, he made his debut on the Junior Grand Prix, placing 11th in Canada and 9th in Norway. He dropped down to ninth at Nationals as a junior. At the 2002 Nationals, he won the bronze medal on the junior level behind Shawn Sawyer and Keegan Murphy.

The 2002-2003 season was Mabee's senior national debut. Mabee competed at two Junior Grand Prix events, placing 6th and 11th. He then went on to place 9 at Nationals, his first senior competition. The following season, Mabee won his first international junior event and became the second Canadian man after Fedor Andreev to win a medal at the Junior Grand Prix Final. He moved up to sixth at Nationals and earned a spot to the World Junior Figure Skating Championships, where he placed 5th.

The next season, Mabee won a gold and a silver on the Junior Grand Prix, but had a bad skate at the final and placed eighth. He moved up a spot at Nationals, but dropped to 10th at Junior Worlds. It was Mabee's final junior competition.

Senior career[edit]

Mabee moved up to the senior level in 2005-2006, with the hopes of making the Canadian Olympic team. His quest to make the team was chronicled on the fifth estate, along with other skaters like Jeffrey Buttle and Emanuel Sandhu. Mabee placed ninth at Skate America and just off the podium at the NHK Trophy. But he placed fourth at Nationals, missing a berth on the Olympic team by one spot. Mabee had a career-best free skate, but his imperfect short program prevented him from placing higher. Mabee was instead put on the team to the Four Continents Figure Skating Championships, where he won the silver medal, the first senior medal of his career.

The 2006-2007 season began badly for Mabee. He had bad skates at both his Grand Prix events and he went into Nationals with the hope of skating clean and making the world team.[3] He did that and more. He skated two career-best programs, placing second overall, ahead of three-time national champion Emanuel Sandhu. This brought Mabee his first berth on the World team. Mabee went back to the Four Continents Championships, where he placed 5th in a much stronger field than the previous year's. He placed 13th at Worlds.

During the 2007-2008 season, Mabee competed on the Grand Prix. He placed 5th at the 2008 Canadian Figure Skating Championships and did not qualify for either the Four Continents or World teams.

He was originally assigned to the 2008 Skate America and 2008 NHK Trophy Grand Prix events for the 2008-2009 season. However, he withdrew from them and announced in October, 2008 he would not compete in the 2008-2009 season due to a lack of motivation. He announced his retirement from competitor skating on December 10, 2008.[1] After his retirement, he began skating professionally on the west coast tour of Disney on Ice's High School Musical: The Ice Tour. He is now skating in the ice shows aboard the Royal Caribbean Cruiseships.

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2007–2008 Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia
by Aram Katchaturian
Sing, Sing, Sing
from Fosse: A Song and Dance Spectacular (soundtrack)
2006–2007 Blues Deluxe
by R. Stewart
Big Band Selections
Pearl Harbor (soundtrack)
Ordinary Day
by Great Big Sea
2005–2006 Fear
by Ástor Piazzolla
Tango Remembrances
by Calandrelli and Piazzolla
Arvid Beaten
by James Horner
Concerto For Cootie
by Duke Ellington
Begin the Beguine
by Cole Porter
Flyin Home
by Lionel Hampton and Benny Goodman
Brothers
by Hana Zimmer
Decommission & Alien Landscape
by Christopher Gordon
Shout It Out Loud[disambiguation needed]
Play That Funky Music
by Wild Cherry
2004–2005 Art of War
by Vanessa-Mae
Finlandia
by John Selibus
2003–2004 Fantasia Slaughter on 10th Avenue
by Richard Rodgers
Rhapsody in Blue (Part 3)
by George Gershwin

Results[edit]

Event 1997–98 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08
World Championships 13th
Four Continents Championships 2nd 5th
World Junior Championships 5th 10th
Canadian Championships 2nd N. 4th J. 9th J. 3rd J. 9th 6th 5th 4th 2nd 5th
Skate Canada International 4th
Trophée Eric Bompard 8th
Skate America 9th 9th
Cup of Russia 10th
NHK Trophy 4th
Junior Grand Prix Final 3rd 8th
Junior Grand Prix, Belgrade 1st
Junior Grand Prix, USA 6th 2nd
Junior Grand Prix, Slovenia 1st
Junior Grand Prix, Slovakia 3rd
Junior Grand Prix, China 11th
Junior Grand Prix, Netherlands 15th
Junior Grand Prix, Norway 9th
Junior Grand Prix, Canada 11th
Triglav Trophy 5th N.
Western Ontario Sectionals 1st J.
Western Challenge 3rd J.
N. = Novice level; J. = Junior level

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Abbot, Chris (December 10, 2008). "Turn pro". Woodstock Sentinel-Review. 
  2. ^ Mittan, Barry (February 13, 2004). "Medal Not a Maybe for Canada’s Mabee". Golden Skate. 
  3. ^ Kondakova, Anna (March 18, 2007). "Figure skating crowd-pleaser gets his turn". Golden Skate. 

External links[edit]