Christopher Melchert

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Christopher Melchert is an American scholar of Islam, specialising in Islamic movements and institutions, especially in the ninth and tenth centuries C.E. A prolific author, he is University Lecturer in Arabic and Islam at the University of Oxford's Oriental Institute, and is Fellow in Arabic at Pembroke College, Oxford.

Melchert graduated with a Ph.D. in History (1992) from the University of Pennsylvania. His Ph.D. was later published as a book, titled The Formation of the Sunni Schools of Law, with Brill Publishers, Leiden.

Having written about whether women can be prayer leaders according to the early Sunni and Shii jurists, he is one of the few experts who has written authoritatively on the question.[1]

Selected publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Ahmad ibn Hanbal. Oxford: Oneworld, 2006. (in 116 World Cat libraries) [2]
  • The Formation of the Sunni Schools of Law, 9th-10th Centuries C.E. ( Studies in Islamic law and society, v. 4). Leiden: Brill, 1997.
    • Review by W B Hallaq International Journal of Middle East Studies 31, no. 2, (1999): 278-280
    • Review by P Sanders American Journal of Legal History43, Part 1 (1999): 98

Book Chapters and Journal articles[edit]

  • 2012
    • ‘The Islamic Literature on Encounters between Muslim Renunciants and Christ­ian Monks’. Pages 135-42 in Medieval Arabic Thought: Essays in Honour of Fritz Zimmermann. Edited by Rotraud Hansberger, M. Afifi al-Akiti, and Charles Burnett. Warburg Institute Studies and Texts 4. London: Warburg Institute, 2012.
  • 2011
    • ‘Abū Isḥāq al-Šīrāzī and Ibn al‑Ṣabbāġ and the Advantages of Teaching at a madrasa’, Annales Islamolo­giques, no 45 (2011), 141-66.
    • ‘Exaggerated fear in the early Islamic Renunciant Tradition’, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, ser. 3, 21 (2011): 283-300.
    • ‘“God created Adam in his image”’, Journal of Qur’anic Studies 13/1 (2011): 113-24.
  • 2010
    • ‘Khargūshī, Tahdhīb al-asrār’, Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 73 (2010): 29-44.
    • ‘Bukhārī and His Ṣaḥīḥ’, Le Muséon 123 (2010): 425-54.
    • ‘Māwardī, Abū Ya‛lá, and the Sunni Revival’. Pp. 37-61 in Prosperity and Stagnation: Some Cultural and Social Aspects of the Abbasid Period (750-1258). Edited by Krzystof Kościelniak. Orientalia Christiana Cracoviensia, Monographiae 1. Cracow: UNUM, 2010.
  • 2008
    • "Martyrdom in Islam". Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient. 52, no. 2: 343-344. 2008
    • ‘The Relation of the Ten Readings to One Another’, Journal of Qur’anic Studies 10/2 (2008): 73-87.
    • "Encyclopedia of Canonical Hadīth". Islamic Law and Society. 15, no. 3: 408-411. 2008
    • ‘Aḥmad ibn Ḥanbal’s Book of Renunciation’, Der Islam 85 (2008): 345-59.
  • 2007
    • Melchert, Christopher. "Intent in Islamic Law. Motive and Meaning in Medieval Sunn̐ư". Islamic Law and Society. 14, no. 3: 425-427.2007
  • 2006
    • "Whether to Keep Women out of the Mosque: A Survey of Medieval Islamic Law". Pages 59–69 in Authority, Privacy and Public Order in Islam: Proceedings of the 22nd Congress of l'Union Européenne des Arabisants et Islamisants. Edited by B. Michalak-Pikulska and A. Pikulsi. Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta 148. Leuven: Peeters, 2006.
    • "Basran Origins of Classical Sufism", Der Islam 83 (2006): 221-40.
  • 2005
    • "The Musnad of Ahmad ibn Hanbal: How It Was Composed and What Distinguishes It from the Six Books", Der Islam 82 (2005): 32-51.
  • 2004
    • "The Meaning of qala 'l-Shafi`i in Ninth-Century Sources". Pages 277-301 in `Abbasid Studies. Edited by James E. Montgomery. Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta 135. Leuven: Peeters, 2004.
    • "The Etiquette of Learning in the Early Islamic Study Circle". Pages 33–44 in Law and Education in Medieval Islam: Studies in Memory of Professor George Makdisi. Edited by Joseph E. Lowry, Devin J. Stewart, and Shawkat M. Toorawa. (Warminster): E. J. W. Gibb Memorial Trust, 2004.
    • "The Early History of Islamic Law", Pages 293-324 Methods and Theories in the Study of Early Islam, edited by Herbert Berg, forthcoming from Brill.
  • 2003
    • The Early History of Islamic Law". Pages 293-324 in Methods and Theories in the Study of Islamic Origins. Edited by Herbert Berg. Islamic History and Civilization. Studies and Texts 49. Leiden: Brill, 2003.
  • 2002
    • "The Piety of the Hadith Folk", International Journal of Middle East Studies 34 (2002): 425-39.
    • "Early Renunciants As Hadith Transmitters". The Muslim World; a Quarterly Review of History, Culture, Religions & the Christian Mission in Islamdom. 92, no. 3: 407. (2002)
  • 2001
    • "Traditionist-jurisprudents (and the Framing of Islamic law" Islamic Law and Society, 8, no. 3 383-406 (2001)
    • "Quranic Abrogation Across the Ninth Century". Pages 75–98 in Studies in Islamic Legal Theory. Edited by Bernard Weiss. Islamic Law and Society, 15. Leiden: Brill, 2002.
    • "The Hanabila and the Early Sufis", Arabica 48 (2001): 352-67.
    • "Bukhari and Early Hadith Criticism", Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (2001): 7-19.
  • 2000
    • "Ibn Mujahid and the Establishment of Seven Quranic Readings", Studia Islamica, no 91 (2000), 5-22.
  • 1999
    • "How Hanafism Came to Originate in Kufa and Traditionalism in Medina". Islamic Law and Society. 6, no. 3: 318-347.
  • 1997
    • "The Adversaries of Aḥmad Ibn Ḥanbal". Arabica. 44, no. 2: 234-253. (1997)
    • "George Makdisi and Wael B. Hallaq". Arabica. 44, no. 2: 308-316. (1997)
  • 1996

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Whether to Keep Women out of the Mosque: A Survey of Medieval Islamic Law". Pages 59–69 in Authority, Privacy and Public Order in Islam: Proceedings of the 22nd Congress of l'Union Européenne des Arabisants et Islamisants. Edited by B. Michalak-Pikulska and A. Pikulsi. Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta 148. Leuven: Peeters, 2006.
  2. ^ http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/70173862&referer=brief_results

External links[edit]