Christopher N. L. Brooke

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Christopher Nugent Lawrence BrookeCBE FBA FSA is a British medieval historian. He is the son of Zachary Nugent Brooke.

Brooke taught at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, from 1977 to 1994. He is a Life Fellow and Dixie Professor Emeritus of Ecclesiastical History there.[1]

Publications[edit]

Among Brooke's publications are:

  • The Church and the Welsh Border in the Central Middle Ages [2]
  • London, 800–1216 : The Shaping of a City[3]
  • The English Church & the Papacy, From the Conquest to the Reign of John[4]
  • The Medieval Idea of Marriage[5]
  • A History of the University of Cambridge. Vol. 4, 1870–1990[6]
  • Churches and Churchmen in Medieval Europe[7]
  • The Normans as Cathedral Builders[8]
  • The Architectural History of Winchester Cathedral[9]
  • The Saxon and Norman Kings[10]
  • From Alfred to Henry III 871–1272[11]
  • Carte Nativorum: A Peterborough Abbey Cartulary of the Fourteenth Century[12]
  • The Letters of John of Salisbury[13]
  • The Letters of John of Salisbury. Vol. 2, The Later Letters (1163–1180)[14]
  • A History of Gonville and Caius College[15]
  • Gilbert Foliot and his letters[16]
  • The Heads of Religious Houses, England and Wales: Volume 1, 940–1216[17]
  • The Investiture Disputes[18]
  • Religious Sentiment and Church Design in the Later Middle Ages[19]
  • Archbishop Lanfranc, the English Bishops and the Council of London of 1075[20]
  • The Monastic Constitutions of Lanfranc[21]
  • Councils and Synods, with Other Documents Relating to the English Church: Volume I: A.D. 871–1204[22]
  • Hugh the chanter : the history of the church of York, 1066–1127[23]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Professor Christopher Brooke CBE, FBA, Hon VPSA". Gonville & Caius College. Retrieved 31 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "The church and the Welsh border in the central Middle Ages". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  3. ^ "London, 800–1216 : the shaping of a city". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  4. ^ "The English church & the papacy, from the Conquest to the reign of John". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  5. ^ "The medieval idea of marriage". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  6. ^ "A history of the University of Cambridge. Vol. 4, 1870–1990". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  7. ^ "Churches and churchmen in medieval Europe". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  8. ^ "The Normans as cathedral builders". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  9. ^ "The architectural history of Winchester Cathedral". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  10. ^ "The Saxon and Norman Kings". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  11. ^ "From Alfred to Henry III 871–1272". World Cat.  Accessed on 10 March 2009
  12. ^ "Carte nativorum : a Peterborough Abbey cartulary of the fourteenth century". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  13. ^ "The letters of John of Salisbury". World Cat.  Accessed on 10 March 2009
  14. ^ "The letters of John of Salisbury. Vol. 2, The later letters (1163–1180)". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  15. ^ "A history of Gonville and Caius college". World Cat.  Accessed on 10 March 2009
  16. ^ "Gilbert Foliot and his letters". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  17. ^ "The heads of religious houses, England and Wales. [1], 940–1216". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  18. ^ "The investiture disputes". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  19. ^ "Religious sentiment and church design in the later Middle Ages". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  20. ^ "Archbishop Lanfranc, the English bishops and the Council of London of 1075". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  21. ^ "The monastic constitutions of Lanfranc". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  22. ^ "Councils and synods, with other documents relating to the English church, I, A.D. 871–1204". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  23. ^ "Hugh the chanter : the history of the church of York, 1066–1127". World Cat. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 

References[edit]