Chromium nitrate

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Chromium nitrate
Chromium nitrate.svg
Chromium nitrate crystals.jpg
Names
IUPAC name
Chromium(III) nitrate
Other names
Nitric acid, chromium(3+) salt
Identifiers
CAS number 13548-38-4 YesY
7789-02-8 (nonahydrate) YesY
ChemSpider 15285818 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem 24598
RTECS number GB6300000
UNII C6H0RE016B YesY
UN number 2720
Properties
Cr(NO3)3
[Cr(H2O)6](NO3)3•3H2O (nonahydrate)
Molar mass 238.011 g/mol (anhydrous)
400.21 g/mol (nonahydrate)
Appearance Blue-violet crystals (anhydrous)
Purple crystals (nonahydrate)
Density 1.85 g/cm3 (nonahydrate)
Melting point 60.06 °C (140.11 °F; 333.21 K) nonahydrate
Boiling point > 100 °C (212 °F; 373 K) (decomposes)
81 g/100 mL (20 °C)
Hazards
MSDS Oxford MSDS
EU Index Not listed
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., water Health code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g., chlorine gas Reactivity code 1: Normally stable, but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures. E.g., calcium Special hazard OX: Oxidizer. E.g., potassium perchlorateNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point Non-flammable
3250 mg/kg (rat, oral, nonahydrate)
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Chromium(III) nitrate describes several inorganic compounds consisting of chromium, nitrate and varying amounts of water. Most common is the dark violet hydrated solid, but an anhydrous green form is also known. Chromium(III) nitrate compounds are of a limited importance commercially, finding some applications in the dyeing industry.[1] It is common in academic laboratories for the synthesis of chromium coordination complexes.

Structure[edit]

The relatively complicated formula - [Cr(H2O)6](NO3)33H2O - highlights the complicated structure of this material. The chromium centers are bound to six water ligands, and the remaining volume of the solid is occupied by three nitrate anions and three molecules of water of crystallization. Such complicated formulas typify hydrated metal salts.

Properties and preparation[edit]

The anhydrous salt forms green crystals and very soluble in water. At 100 °C it decomposes. The red-violet hydrate is highly soluble in water. Chromium nitrate is used in the production of alkali metal-free catalysts and in pickling.

Chromium nitrate can be prepared by dissolving chromium oxide in nitric acid.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gerd Anger, Jost Halstenberg, Klaus Hochgeschwender, Christoph Scherhag, Ulrich Korallus, Herbert Knopf, Peter Schmidt, Manfred Ohlinger, "Chromium Compounds" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2005.
Salts and the ester of the Nitrate ion
HNO3 He
LiNO3 Be(NO3)2 B(NO3)4 RONO2 NO3
NH4NO3
O FNO3 Ne
NaNO3 Mg(NO3)2 Al(NO3)3 Si P S ClONO2 Ar
KNO3 Ca(NO3)2 Sc(NO3)3 Ti(NO3)4 VO(NO3)3 Cr(NO3)3 Mn(NO3)2 Fe(NO3)3 Co(NO3)2,
Co(NO3)3
Ni(NO3)2 Cu(NO3)2 Zn(NO3)2 Ga(NO3)3 Ge As Se Br Kr
RbNO3 Sr(NO3)2 Y Zr(NO3)4 Nb Mo Tc Ru Rh Pd(NO3)2 AgNO3 Cd(NO3)2 In Sn Sb Te I XeFNO3
CsNO3 Ba(NO3)2   Hf Ta W Re Os Ir Pt Au Hg2(NO3)2,
Hg(NO3)2
Tl(NO3)3 Pb(NO3)2 Bi(NO3)3 Po At Rn
Fr Ra   Rf Db Sg Bh Hs Mt Ds Rg Cn Uut Fl Uup Lv Uus Uuo
La Ce(NO3)x Pr Nd Pm Sm Eu Gd Tb Dy Ho Er Tm Yb Lu
Ac Th Pa UO2(NO3)2 Np Pu Am Cm Bk Cf Es Fm Md No Lr