Chrysler Voyager

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For the predecessor Plymouth minivan, see Plymouth Voyager.
Chrysler Voyager/Grand Voyager
Chrysler Voyager front 20080419.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer Chrysler
Production 1988–present
Body and chassis
Class Minivan
Related Dodge Caravan
Chrysler Town & Country
Volkswagen Routan
Chronology
Predecessor Plymouth Voyager
Lancia Phedra (Europe)
Successor Chrysler Town & Country (short-wheelbase)

The Chrysler Voyager or Chrysler Grand Voyager is a luxury minivan sold by the Chrysler division of American automobile manufacturer Chrysler Group LLC. For most of its existence, vehicles bearing the Chrysler Voyager nameplate have been sold exclusively outside the United States, primarily in Europe and Mexico.

The Voyager was introduced in Europe in 1988 as a rebadged version of the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager sold in the United States, and has evolved with the Caravan, Plymouth Voyager, and Chrysler Town & Country since. Vehicles bearing the Chrysler Voyager nameplate were briefly sold in the United States from 2001 to 2003 as a rebadged version of the short-wheelbase (SWB) variant of the Plymouth Voyager following the 2001 folding of the Plymouth division of DaimlerChrysler AG.

Together with its nameplate variants, the Chrysler minivans have ranked as the 13th bestselling automotive nameplate worldwide, with over 12 million sold.[1]

The European Chrysler Voyager was first released in 1988, nearly identical to its American counterpart, the Plymouth Voyager; the only visual differences between the two were the head/taillights and grille. Besides the slightly different appearance, the European Voyagers were sold with different engines, including diesel engines, which are popular in Europe; and the trim was different. They were also available with manual transmission & a foot operated emergency brake.

The current European Chrysler Grand Voyagers are very similar to the 2008 and later Chrysler Town & Country cars, and are sold only in the long-wheelbase version (as in North America).

Although now produced solely in Ontario, Canada, the Grand Voyagers are still available with diesel engines as standard. These diesel engines are based on a modern double overhead cam common rail design from VM Motori of Italy.

Since 2011, the Voyager is sold under the Lancia badge in Europe to strengthen the Chrysler-Lancia integration, though it remains branded as the Chrysler Voyager in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

First generation (1988–1990)[edit]

First generation
VoyagerIEuropeLeft.jpg
Overview
Also called Chrysler Grand Voyager (LWB Model)
Chrysler Voyager (SWB Model)
Production 1988–1990
Body and chassis
Body style 3-door minivan
Layout Transverse front-engine, front-wheel drive / all-wheel drive
Platform Chrysler S platform
Related Chrysler Town & Country
Plymouth Voyager
Dodge Caravan
Powertrain
Engine 2.5 L KI4
3.3 L EGA V6
3.0 L Mitsubishi 6G72 V6
Transmission 5-speed manual
3-speed A413 automatic
3-speed A670 automatic
4-speed A604 automatic

1988–1990 models sold in Europe were Dodge Caravans rebranded as Chryslers. In America, Caravan was sold alongside a similar Plymouth Voyager counterpart. Europe's Chrysler Voyager was nearly identical to the american Dodge Caravan except that V6 power was not available for the european version. American models were offered in most states with either a 2.5 L four-cylinder or a 3.0 L Mitsubishi V6 engine. After 1989, the Mitsubishi V6 didn't meet emissions standards in California and several northeastern states. In those locales, the 3.3 L engine was offered in place of the 3.0 L .

Engines[edit]

Second generation (1991–1995)[edit]

Second generation
Chrysler Voyager SE.JPG
Overview
Also called Chrysler Grand Voyager (LWB Model)
Chrysler Voyager (SWB Model)
Production 1991–1995
Assembly Fenton, Missouri, United States
Graz, Austria (Eurostar)
Body and chassis
Body style 3-door minivan
Layout Transverse front-engine, front-wheel drive / all-wheel drive
Platform Chrysler AS platform
Related Chrysler Town & Country
Plymouth Voyager
Dodge Caravan
Powertrain
Engine 2.5 L K I4
2.5 L VM425 Turbo Diesel
3.0 L Mitsubishi 6G72 V6
3.3 L EGA V6
3.8 L EGH V6
Transmission 5-speed manual
3-speed A413 automatic
3-speed A670 automatic
4-speed A604 automatic

1991–1995 models in Europe are rebadged Dodge Caravans, although the Caravan in the USA was sold alongside the Chrysler Voyager in counterparts. For 1991, the Chrysler Voyager in Europe was identical to the Plymouth Voyager in the United States except that the 3.8 L V6 was not available for the Chrysler Voyager. Base models of the Voyager were offered in most states with either a 2.5 L four-cylinder or a 3.0 L Mitsubishi V6 engine, except in California and several northeastern states, where the Mitsubishi V6 didn't meet emissions standards. In those locales, the 3.3 L engine was offered instead.There are also military modifications and modifications to South Africa with the increase in fuel tanks that are 240 and 360 liters. Starting from 1994 was offered for European market 2.5 L turbo diesel produced by VM motori. The 1991–1995 Chrysler Voyager's mesh grille is related to a Dodge Caravan in the United States. It was also the final generation with manual transmission.

Engines[edit]

Third generation (1996–2000)[edit]

Third generation
Chrysler Grand Voyager front 20070914.jpg
Overview
Also called Chrysler Caravan
Chrysler Grand Caravan
Chrysler Grand Voyager (LWB model)
Chrysler Voyager (SWB model)
Production 1996–2000
Assembly Fenton, Missouri, United States
Graz, Austria (Eurostar)
Body and chassis
Body style 3-door minivan
4-door minivan
Layout Front-engine, front-wheel drive / Four-wheel drive
Platform Chrysler GS platform
Chrysler NS platform
Related Chrysler Town & Country
Dodge Caravan
Plymouth Voyager
Powertrain
Engine
Transmission 3-speed 31TH automatic
4-speed 41TE automatic
5-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 113.3 in (2,878 mm)
119.3 in (3,030 mm) (Grand Voyager)
Length 186.3 in (4,732 mm)
199.6 in (5,070 mm) (Grand Voyager)
Width 75.6 in (1,920 mm)
Height 68.5 in (1,740 mm)
68.4 in (1,737 mm)
Curb weight 3,528 lb (1,600 kg)
3,680 lb (1,669 kg) (Grand Voyager)
Chrysler Voyager (Mexico)

1996–1999 models in Mexico are rebadged Dodge Caravans, although the Caravan was sold alongside the Voyager. For 2000, the Chrysler Voyager was identical to the Plymouth Voyager except that the 3.8 L V6 was not available for the Chrysler Voyager. Base models of the Voyager were offered in most states with either a 2.4 L four-cylinder or a 3.0 L Mitsubishi V6 engine, except in California and several northeastern states, where the Mitsubishi V6 didn't meet emissions standards. In those locales, the 3.3 L engine was offered instead. For European market were offered also 2.0 L Straight-4 SOHC and DOHC engines and 2.5 L turbo diesel produced by VM motori. European market vans also came in a six-passenger model with six captains chairs, not available elsewhere.

Engines[edit]

Safety[edit]

According to EuroNCAP crash test results, the 1996 model Chrysler Voyager did so badly in the frontal impact that it earned no points,[2] making it the worst of the group. The body structure became unstable and the steering column was driven back into the driver's chest and head'. The 2006 model Chrysler Voyager fared little better, achieving just 19% in the frontal impact test, with an overall score of 2 stars out of a possible 5.[3] However, chest compression measurements on the test dummy 'indicated an unacceptably high risk of serious or fatal injury. As a result, the final star in the adult occupant rating is struck-through'.

Despite the bad results in the Euro NCAP crash tests, statistics from the real world indicate that this is not the whole picture. Folksam is a Swedish insurance company that in May 2009 published a report on injuries and survivability of 172 car models. The 88–96 generation got a real world rating of "Average", and the 96-00 generation got a rating called "Safest" (at least 30% safer than the average car.)

2000 Chrysler Voyager (US)

Fourth generation (2001–2007)[edit]

Fourth generation
Chrysler Voyager front 20090206.jpg
Overview
Also called Chrysler Caravan
Chrysler Grand Caravan
Chrysler Grand Voyager (LWB model)
Chrysler Voyager (SWB model)
Production 2001–2007
Assembly Fenton, Missouri, United States
Graz, Austria (Eurostar)
Fuzhou, China
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door minivan
Layout Front-engine, front-wheel drive / Four-wheel drive
Platform Chrysler RG Platform
Chrysler RS platform
Related Chrysler Town & Country
Dodge Caravan
Powertrain
Engine 2.4 L EDZ I4
3.3 L EGA V6
3.8 L EGH V6
3.0 L 6G72 (China)
2.5 L Turbo Diesel R 425
2.8 L Turbo Diesel R 428
Transmission 3-speed 31TH automatic
4-speed 41TE automatic
5-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 113.3 in (2,878 mm)
Grand Voyager: 119.3 in (3,030 mm)
Length 189.1 in (4,803 mm)
2001–02 LX: 189.3 in (4,808 mm)
Grand Voyager: 200.5 in (5,093 mm)
Width 78.6 in (1,996 mm)
Height 68.9 in (1,750 mm)
2001–2003 Grand Voyager: 1,748 mm (68.8 in)
2005–present: 1,750 mm (68.9 in)
2001–2003 Chrysler Voyager (US)

From 2001 to 2003, the Voyager was offered in the SWB model only, replacing the SWB Plymouth Voyager. It resembled the Town and Country more than the previous generation, the only major cosmetic difference besides the trim (where the Town and Country's is fancier) was the placement of the Chrysler emblem on the grille. After the 2003 model year, the Voyager was discontinued (United States market) and replaced by the Chrysler Town and Country, SWB model.

Engines[edit]

  • 2001–2003 3.3 L EGA V6
  • 2001–2003 3.8 L EGH V6
  • 2001–2003 2.4 L EDZ I4
  • 2009–present (China) 3.0 L 6G72 V6

Year to year changes[edit]

  • 2000: The Voyager is sold as a Plymouth and as a Chrysler, with the same options and features, however the Chrysler versions have sticker prices of about $500 USD more.
  • 2001: The Chrysler Voyager was completely redesigned for this year as were the other Chrysler minivans. It was now only sold under the Chrysler marque; no "Grand" LWB versions are sold. Some new features include side airbags and an optional navigation system.
  • 2002: Either a VCR or a DVD-based rear-seat entertainment system was a new optional, dealer-installed on all 2002 Voyagers. A high-value entry-level model, the eC was offered this year along with the base and LX models. All 2002 Voyagers now used a four-speed automatic transmission.
  • 2003: Power-adjustable brake and accelerator pedals were available on 2003 Voyagers. Anti-lock brakes remained optional for the upscale LX, but were no longer available for base Voyagers. The Voyager was discontinued after this year and was replaced by the little-changed SWB Town and Country.
2007 Chrysler Grand Voyager (European model)

In Europe Chrysler began offering the Voyager with the first generation, followed by the second generation model in 2001, with a new engine range – including larger, more economical diesel engines (2.5 L and for 2005 – the 2.8 L 4 cyl. from VM Motori) and more fuel-efficient petrol engines (4 cyl. and V-6).

The fourth generation Grand Voyager continues to be produced in China for that market alongside the fourth generation Dodge Grand Caravan.

Fifth generation (2008–present)[edit]

Fifth generation
Chrysler Grand Voyager V front 20100508.jpg
Overview
Also called Lancia Voyager
Production 2008–present
Assembly Windsor, Ontario, Canada (Chrysler Canada)
Designer Ralph Gilles
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door minivan
Layout Transverse front-engine, front-wheel drive
Platform Chrysler RT platform
Related Chrysler Town & Country
Dodge Grand Caravan
Volkswagen Routan
Powertrain
Engine 2.8 L RA428 I4 diesel
3.8 L EGH V6
3.6 L Pentastar V6
Transmission 6-speed 62TE automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 121.2 in (3,078 mm)
Length 202.5 in (5,144 mm)
Width 76.9 in (1,953 mm)
Height 68.9 in (1,750 mm)

Chrysler introduced the new Grand Voyager for 2008 and successfully positioned it in the automotive market as a luxury MPV suited for large families. The Grand Voyager is visually identical to the Chrysler Town & Country which is sold in the North American and South American markets. In similar fashion to the other large multi-purpose vehicles (MPVs) on the market the Grand Voyager is sold with a standard diesel engine in Europe.

However, the seating is arranged in the 2–2–3 (front to rear) layout common in North America, rather than the 2–3–2 layout often seen in SUVs and MPVs in Europe. On right hand drive (RHD) models the gear shift lever is placed on a floor-mounted console between the seats, in contrast to the instrument panel positioning found on LHD models.

One may also notice it has been used in the TV show The Apprentice to carry Lord Sugar's apprentices to their destination (as well as the model that preceded this one).

Standard engine[edit]

  • 2008–present: 2.8 L (2776 cc) CRD I4, 163 hp (122 kW) at 3800 rpm and 265 lb·ft (359 N·m) at 1600 rpm.[4] (RA 428 DOHC)

The 2009 Grand Voyager with diesel motor gets a combined fuel economy of 9.3 L/100 km (30 mpg-imp; 25 mpg-US).[5]

Optional engine on top of the range Limited models:

  • 2008–2010: 3.8 L (3778 cc, 230.5 cu in) EGH V6, 197 hp (147 kW) at 5200 rpm and 230 lb·ft (312 N·m) at 4000 rpm
  • 2010–present: 3.6 L (3604 cc, 220 cu in) Pentastar V6, 283 hp (211 kW) at 6600 rpm and 260 lb·ft (353 N·m) at 4800 rpm

All engines are paired with Chrysler's 62TE 6-speed automatic transmission with variable line pressure (VLP) technology (See Ultradrive).

Lancia Voyager[edit]

All Voyagers sold from October 2011 onwards in continental Europe are sold under the Lancia brand.

The Chrysler-branded variant continues to be sold in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Russia, South Korea, Singapore, and China, as Lancia does not have sales operations in those markets.

The Lancia Voyager is the successor of the Lancia Phedra in the Lancia range.

European engines[edit]

The Lancia version is offered with engines compliant with Euro V emission standards.

Model Engine Displacement Max. power Max. torque Years
3.6 Pentastar automatic V6, Petrol 3,604 cc 208 kW (279 hp) 344 N·m (254 lb·ft) 2011-present
2.8 Turbo Diesel automatic straight-4, Diesel 2,777 cc 120 kW (161 hp) 360 N·m (266 lb·ft) 2011-2013
131 kW (176 hp) 360 N·m (266 lb·ft) 2013-present

Safety[edit]

Euro NCAP test results
Lancia Voyager (2011)[6]
Test Points %
Overall: 4 /5 stars
Adult occupant: 29 79%
Child occupant: 33 67%
Pedestrian: 17 47%
Safety assist: 5 71%

Seating features[edit]

The Chrysler Voyager has incorporated various seating systems for their minivans to enhance interior flexibility.

Integrated child safety seats[edit]

In 1992, Chrysler introduced a second row bench seat integrating two child booster seats. These seats continued as an available option through fifth generation until they were discontinued in 2010.

Easy Out Roller Seats[edit]

In 1996, Chrysler had introduced a system of seats to simplify installation, removal, and re-positioning— marketed as Easy-Out Roller Seats. The system remained in use throughout the life of the Chrysler Voyager.

When installed, the seats are latched to floor-mounted strikers. When unlatched, eight rollers lift each seat, allowing it to be rolled fore and aft. Tracks have locator depressions for rollers, thus enabling simple installation. Ergonomic levers at the seatbacks release the floor latches single handedly without tools and raise the seats onto the rollers in a single motion. Additionally, seatbacks were designed to fold forward. Seat roller tracks are permanently attached to the floor and seat stanchions are aligned, facilitating the longitiudinal rolling of the seats. Bench seat stanchions were moved inboard to reduce bending stress in the seat frames, allowing them to be lighter.

When configured as two and three person benches, the Easy Out Roller Seats could be unwieldy. Beginning in 2001, second and third row seats became available in a 'quad' configuration – bucket or captain chairs in the second row and a third row three-person 50/50 split "bench" — with each section weighing under 50 lb (23 kg).

Stow'n Go seating[edit]

In 2005, Chrysler introduced a system of second and third row seating that folded completely into under-floor compartments – marketed as Stow 'n Go seating and exclusively available on long-wheelbase models.

In a development program costing $400 million,[7] engineers used an erector set to initially help visualize the complex interaction of the design[8] and redesigned underfloor components to accommodate the system — including the spare tire well, fuel tank, exhaust system, parking brake cables, rear climate control lines, and the rear suspension.[8] Even so, the new seating system precluded incorporation of an AWD system, effectively ending that option for the Chrysler minivans.

The system in turn creates a combined volume of 12 cubic feet (340 L) of under floor storage when second row seats are deployed. With both row folded, the vans have a flat load floor and a maximum cargo volume of 160.7 cubic feet (4,550 L).[7][9]

The Stow 'n Go system received the Popular Science Magazine's "Best of What's New" for 2005 award.[10]

The Stow 'n Go system is not offered on the Volkswagen Routan, a rebadged nameplate variant of the Chrysler minivans.

Swivel 'n Go Seating[edit]

Chrysler introduced a seating system in 2008, marketed as Swivel'n Go. In the seating system, two full size second row seats swivel to face the third row. A detachable table can be placed between the second and third row seats. The Swivel'n Go seating system includes the 3rd row seating from the Stow'n Go system.

These Swivel 'n Go Seats are manufactured by Intier Corp. a division of Magna. The tracks, risers and swivel mechanisms are assembled by Camslide, a division of Intier. The swivel mechanism was designed by and is produced by Toyo Seat USA Corp.

The system is noted for its high strength.[citation needed] The entire load of the seat in the event of a crash is transferred through the swivel mechanism, which is almost twice as strong as the minimum government requirement.[citation needed]

The swivel mechanism includes bumpers that stabilize the seat while in the lock position. When rotated the seat comes off these bumpers to allow easy rotation.

The seat is not meant to be left in an unlocked position or swiveled with the occupant in it, although this will not damage the swivel mechanism.

Production worldwide[edit]

European Lancia Voyager in Germany

In the early years of its marketing, the Voyagers were produced in North America and were exported to Europe (1988–1991).

In 1991, the first Voyagers were produced in Austria, at the Eurostar plant nearby Graz. Eurostar was a joint venture between Chrysler and the Austrian company Steyr-Daimler-Puch.[11] It was later acquired by DaimlerChrysler and finally the plant was sold to Magna Steyr in 2002.[12] The minivan production ended there at the end of 2007.[13] Units produced in Austria were marketed in Europe, Asia and Africa. They were built with gasoline and diesel engines, with manual transmission version, in short-wheelbase (SWB) and long-wheelbase versions, and in right and left-hand drive versions (all sold as Chrysler Voyager).

The fifth generation Voyagers (2008–2011) have been exported to Europe from Windsor, Canada, where they are produced. Beginning in October 2011, they were exported and sold as the Lancia Voyager in most European markets, as Chrysler operations were merged with those of Lancia in many European countries. In the United Kingdom, only the Grand Voyager is marketed.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Chrysler LLC Celebrates 25th Anniversary of the Minivan". Autonew24h.com. 
  2. ^ "Chrysler Voyager 1999". euroncap.com. Retrieved 2008-02-01. 
  3. ^ "Chrysler Voyager 2007". www.euroncap.com. Retrieved 2008-02-01. 
  4. ^ "Grand Voyager – Specifications". Chrysler. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
  5. ^ "Caractéristiques Techniques et Tarifaires Grand Voyager" (in French). Chrysler France. 2008. Retrieved August 12, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Euro NCAP results for Lancia Voyager". euroncap.com. 2011. 
  7. ^ a b "Chrysler extends leadership in Mideast minivan segment with 'Stow 'n Go'". Ameinfo.com. 
  8. ^ a b "Chrysler Group Brings Minivan Segment's Only Stow 'n Go Seating And Storage System to Market in Just 18 Months". Chrysler Press Release. 
  9. ^ http://www.media.chrysler.com/newsrelease.do?id=129
  10. ^ "Stow 'n Go Minivan Technology Awarded Popular Science Magazine's "Best of What's New" for 2005". Autointell.com. 
  11. ^ "diepresse.com article, Austrian newspaper". December 3, 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-22. . Eurostar was a Joint-Venture
  12. ^ "handelsblatt.com article, German newspaper". February 15, 2002. Retrieved 2008-01-22. . Chrysler is selling Eurostar to Magna Steyr
  13. ^ "diepresse.com article, Austrian newspaper". June 4, 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-22. . Voyager production ended in 2007 in Austria.

References[edit]

External links[edit]