Chuck Broyles

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Chuck Broyles
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1947-02-05) February 5, 1947 (age 67)
Bremerton, Washington
Playing career
1966–1968 Pittsburg State
Position(s) Defensive lineman, offensive lineman
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1970–1971
1972
1973
1974–1982
1983–1985
1986–1987
1988–1989
1990–2009
Bishop Carroll HS (KS) (assistant)
Pittsburg State (GA)
Stockton HS (MO)
Missouri–Rolla (DC)
Miami HS (OK) (assistant)
Missouri–Rolla (DC)
Pittsburg State (assistant)
Pittsburg State
Head coaching record
Overall 198–47–2
Bowls 1–0
Tournaments 19–14 (NCAA D-II playoffs)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 NCAA Division II National (1991)
9 MIAA (1990–1992, 1994–1996, 2001, 2003–2004)
Awards
AFCA Division II Coach of the Year (1991)
Liberty Mutual Division II Coach of the Year (2008)

Charles Leroy "Chuck" Broyles (born February 5, 1947) is a former American football player and coach in the United States. He served as the head football coach at Pittsburg State University from 1990 to 2009, compiling a record of 198–47–2 in 20 seasons. His Pittsburg State Gorillas football teams won the NCAA Division II Football Championship in 1991, appeared three other championship games (1992, 1995 and 2004), and captured nine Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association titles. Broyles retired from coaching at Pittsburg State effective December 2, 2009.[1]

Early life and playing career[edit]

Broyles was born in Bremerton, Washington and grew up in Mulberry, Kansas where he played eight-man football. He played on the defensive and offensive lines at Pittsburg State and graduated from the school in 1970.

Coaching career[edit]

From 1970 to 1971, Broyles was an assistant coach at Bishop Carroll High School in Wichita, Kansas. He received an M.A. from Pittsburg in 1972 after serving as a graduate assistant with the football team. In 1973, he was coach of Stockton High School in Stockton, Missouri. He was a defensive coordinator for the University of Missouri-Rolla from 1974 to 1982. He was an assistant coach at Miami High School in Miami, Oklahoma from 1983 to 1985. He returned to Rolla as defensive coordinator in 1986 and 1987.[2]

In 1988, Broyles was an assistant coach at Pittsburg. In his first season as head coach of Pittsburg in 1990, his team went 10–0 in the regular season and won two games in the Division playoffs. In his second season in 1991 he led the college to a 13–1–1 record and a national championship. He was named Division II Coach of the Year.[2]

The powerhouse performance of Pittsburg led to a $5.8 million overhaul of Carnie Smith Stadium in 2000, a further $2.5 million renovation to the west end in 2006, including the addition of eight luxury boxes and the addition of a $1.7 million video board in 2007—the biggest in Division II at the time. Games between Pittsburg and its MIAA rival Northwest Missouri State University are played at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri.[2] The 2005 game was attended by 20,000.

In 2008 he was named Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year. Broyles also plays the role as a husband, father, and grandfather. His wife, Helen, is a local Realtor. He has three sons, Scott, Kyle and Mark. Kyle died in 2008. Scott and his wife Bryna have three daughters, Ashley, Nicole and Jenna.

After previously announcing on November 5, 2009 his intention to stay on as head coach, on December 2, 2009 Broyles announced his retirement.[3]

Quotes[edit]

"We need to win this game. Then we can say ‘Chuck Broyles, head coach at Pittsburg State University 20 years and never had a losing season.’"[4][5] — referring to the November 7, 2009 game against the Truman State University Bulldogs, which they lost, 28–21, giving Broyles his first losing season[6]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Pittsburg State Gorillas (Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association) (1990–2009)
1990 Pittsburg State 12–1 9–0 1st L NCAA Division II Semifinal
1991 Pittsburg State 13–1–1 8–0–1 1st W NCAA Division II Championship
1992 Pittsburg State 14–1 9–0 1st L NCAA Division II Championship
1993 Pittsburg State 8–3 8–1 2nd L NCAA Division II First Round
1994 Pittsburg State 10–1 9–0 1st L NCAA Division II First Round
1995 Pittsburg State 12–1–1 9–0 1st L NCAA Division II Championship
1996 Pittsburg State 8–3 8–1 T–1st L NCAA Division II First Round
1997 Pittsburg State 9–2 8–1 2nd L NCAA Division II First Round
1998 Pittsburg State 7–3 6–3 T–3rd
1999 Pittsburg State 10–2 8–1 2nd L NCAA Division II First Round
2000 Pittsburg State 9–3 7–2 3rd L NCAA Division II First Round
2001 Pittsburg State 11–2 8–1 1st L NCAA Division II Quarterfinal
2002 Pittsburg State 8–3 6–3 T–3rd
2003 Pittsburg State 9–3 7–2 T–1st L NCAA Division II First Round
2004 Pittsburg State 14–1 9–0 1st L NCAA Division II Championship
2005 Pittsburg State 10–4 6–2 T–2nd L NCAA Division II Quarterfinal
2006 Pittsburg State 10–2 7–2 2nd W Mineral Water
2007 Pittsburg State 8–3 6–3 T–3rd
2008 Pittsburg State 11–2 8–1 2nd L NCAA Division II Second Round
2009 Pittsburg State 5–6 3–6 T–7th
Pittsburg State: 198–47–2 149–29–1
Total: 198–47–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Anonymous (2009-12-02). "PSU's Broyles retiresw/ news conference audio » Local News » The Joplin Globe, Joplin, MO". Joplinglobe.com. Retrieved 2010-10-20. 
  2. ^ a b c Chuck Boyle - pittstategorillas.com - Retrieved January 16, 2009
  3. ^ By Anonymous (2009-12-02). "Broyles to retire as head football coach - Pittsburg, KS". Morning Sun. Retrieved 2010-10-20. 
  4. ^ Clark, Matthew (2009-11-05). "Chuck Broyles says he's staying at Pitt State - Pittsburg, KS". Morning Sun. Retrieved 2010-10-20. 
  5. ^ "Video - KOAM TV 7 Joplin and Pittsburg News Weather Sports". Koamtv.com. 2008-01-01. Retrieved 2010-10-20. 
  6. ^ "Bulldogs Stun Gorillas, 28-21, in Season Finale - Athletics News - Pittsburg State University". Pittstategorillas.com. 2009-11-07. Retrieved 2010-10-20. 

External links[edit]