Chuck Hansen

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Chuck Hansen (May 13, 1947 - March 26, 2003) compiled, over a period of 30 years, the world's largest private collection of unclassified documents on how America developed the atomic bomb.

Research[edit]

Hansen's documents were obtained through the U.S. Freedom of Information Act and since his death have been housed at the National Security Archive at George Washington University.[1][2]

In 1988, Hansen wrote the book U.S. Nuclear Weapons: The Secret History,[3] which, along with great detail about the process of developing, testing and administering atomic weapons was critical of the U.S. Defense Department, the Atomic Energy Commission, and some other government agencies. In the book Hansen reported that the early years of nuclear testing were less successful than claimed; bombs failed, or yielded smaller or larger explosions than anticipated or announced, and attempts to develop a radioactivity-free bomb were unsuccessful.[1][2] U.S. Nuclear Weapons: The Secret History is currently out of print, but it is available on compact disk through his publisher.

A second compilation of Hanson's material was published on compact disc as Swords of Armageddon in 1995. While Hansen´s U.S. Nuclear Weapons: The Secret History was very instructive, Swords of Armageddon contains much more information and details about nuclear weapons developed by United States. It is in its second revision.[4]

Further reading[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Christopher Reed. Chuck Hansen: Obsessive collector whose files told America's A-bomb secrets The Guardian, 25 April 2003.
  2. ^ a b William J. Broad. From Cold War to Nuclear Nostalgia The New York Times, December 12, 1989.
  3. ^ Jeffrey G. Barlow. U. S. Nuclear Weapons: The Secret History (Review) The Journal of Military History, Vol. 53, No. 1 (Jan., 1989), pp. 105-106.
  4. ^ "Chuck Hansen's Swords of Armageddon". Retrieved 2013-12-18. 

External links[edit]