Chung Thye Yong

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Chung Thye Yong (Chinese: 郑大养, b. 1868; d. 20 Oct 1915), also known as Chung Ah Yong (郑亚养), was a Malaysian philanthropist, tin miner, rubber planter, rugby player and racehorse owner of the 19th century.

Family And Pedigree[edit]

Born in Penang, Chung Thye Yong was the adopted son of Chung Keng Quee and the eldest in the family.

[1] [2] [3]

He was the brother of Chung Thye Phin and Chung Thye Siong and the father of Chung Kok Ming.

Education[edit]

He was educated at Doveton College in Calcutta, India.[3][4]

Career[edit]

He joined the Government civil service in Perak for a time right after school and then took over the management of his father's Taiping property and became owner of the Yong Phin Mine at Kota near Taiping after his father died in 1901.[3][5][6][7]

His 3,000-acre (12 km2) Hearwood Estate near Sungei Siput, managed by E. Hardouin and with W. D. Wyesuriya as under manager, employed a workforce of 200 Javanese and Tamil workers to cultivate among other crops, rubber, lemongrass and coconuts. The estate was rich with tin and mines there were worked by Chinese who paid taxes for that benefit.[3] He floated his estate into a Limited Liability Company in Singapore in 1906.[8][9]

Sports[edit]

In his day he was described as one of the most enthusiastic sportsmen in the Federated States.[3]

He was the first person of Chinese descent in the country to play rugby.[2][10]

He was the first racehorse owner in Taiping, then the capital of Perak.[11] His racing stables cost him over 12,000 Straits Dollars a year and he placed his prize-winning horses under the charge of a European trainer.[3]

He was believed to have been the first person of Chinese ancestry in the country to play golf.[12]

He was a generous benefactor to the people of Taiping and in 1909 arranged to have a tennis court attached to the Taiping Recreational Club which immediately became greatly in demand.[13]

He (minus 100) was an avid billiard player and defeated Lauder Watson (minus 15) in the final of the Perak Club Billiard handicap in 1908.[14]

Social Service[edit]

He was a member of the Taiping Sanitary Board and a Visiting Justice to the Federated Malay States.[3]

Societies[edit]

He was a member of the Royal Society of Arts, London.[1][3][15][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kajian Malaysia: Journal of Malaysian studies, Volume 10 Published BY Universiti Sains Malaysia, 1992
  2. ^ a b Taiping: the vibrant years by Khoo, Kay Kim Published by OFA Desyne for the Taiping Tourist Association, 2003, ISBN 983-2759-01-3, ISBN 978-983-2759-01-0
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Twentieth Century Impressions of British Malaya by Arnold Wright, 1908 pp. 377, 577
  4. ^ When The 'Towkay' reigned by Khoo, Kay Kim published in the New Straits Times, 5 May 2003
  5. ^ Khoo Kay Kim, 1988 p. 199
  6. ^ Tanjong, Hilir Perak, Larut And Kinta: The Penang-Perak Nexus in History by Prof. Emeritus Dato’ Dr. Khoo Kay Kim, Department of History, University of Malaya.
  7. ^ D.M. Ponnusamy, New Straits Times 27th March 2001.
  8. ^ The Straits Times, 25 August 1909, Page 6
  9. ^ Economic performance in Malaysia: the insider's view by Manning Nash Published by Professors World Peace Academy, 1988, ISBN 0-943852-52-8, ISBN 978-0-943852-52-2
  10. ^ Tanjong, Hilir Perak, Larut And Kinta: The Penang-Perak Nexus in History by Prof. Emeritus Dato’ Dr. Khoo Kay Kim, Department of History, University of Malaya
  11. ^ Taiping's Many Firsts by D. M. Ponnusamy published by Sin Boon Beng Printing Sdn Bhd, Taiping
  12. ^ The Straits Times, 25 February 1903, Page 5
  13. ^ The Straits Times, 4 September 1909, Page 8
  14. ^ The Straits Times, 14 May 1908, Page 8
  15. ^ Journal of the Society of Arts, Volume 49 by the Royal Society of Arts (Great Britain) published by The Society/G. Bell and Sons, 1901, Pg 397, 451
  16. ^ Journal of the Society of Arts, Volume 57 by the Royal Society of Arts (Great Britain) published by The Society, 1908