Chunghye of Goryeo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Chunghye of Goryeo
Hangul 충혜왕
Hanja 忠惠王
Revised Romanization Chunghye wang
McCune–Reischauer Ch'unghye wang
Monarchs of Korea
Goryeo
  1. Taejo 918–943
  2. Hyejong 943–945
  3. Jeongjong 945–949
  4. Gwangjong 949–975
  5. Gyeongjong 975–981
  6. Seongjong 981–997
  7. Mokjong 997–1009
  8. Hyeonjong 1009–1031
  9. Deokjong 1031–1034
  10. Jeongjong II 1034–1046
  11. Munjong 1046–1083
  12. Sunjong 1083
  13. Seonjong 1083–1094
  14. Heonjong 1094–1095
  15. Sukjong 1095–1105
  16. Yejong 1105–1122
  17. Injong 1122–1146
  18. Uijong 1146–1170
  19. Myeongjong 1170–1197
  20. Sinjong 1197–1204
  21. Huijong 1204–1211
  22. Gangjong 1211–1213
  23. Gojong 1213–1259
  24. Wonjong 1259–1274
  25. Chungnyeol 1274–1308
  26. Chungseon 1308–1313
  27. Chungsuk 1313–1330
    1332–1339
  28. Chunghye 1330–1332
    1339–1344
  29. Chungmok 1344–1348
  30. Chungjeong 1348–1351
  31. Gongmin 1351–1374
  32. U 1374–1388
  33. Chang 1388–1389
  34. Gongyang 1389–1392

Chunghye of Goryeo (22 February 1315 - 30 January 1344, r. 1330–1331, 1340–1344) was the 28th king of the Goryeo dynasty of Korea. He was remembered in the Goryeosa for his licentious lifestyle, particularly his habit of abducting, raping, and killing women. Chunghye was the son of King Chungsuk and Queen Myeongdeok, a Hong. He is sometimes known by his Mongolian name, which is rendered in hanja as Botapsilli.

Chunghye travelled to Yuan Dynasty China in 1328. In 1330, then-king Chungsuk petitioned to abdicate the throne, and the emperor sent Chunghye back to Goryeo to assume the throne. But in the following year, Chungsuk returned to the throne and Chunghye returned to China. In 1339, Chungsuk died. One faction supported the noble Wang Go's claim to the throne, but their attempted coup failed and Chunghye's reign was restored.

Chunghye's queen was Princess Deongnyeong, who gave birth to Chungmok.

See also[edit]

Preceded by
Chungsuk
King of the Goryeo Dynasty)
1330–1331, 1340–1344
Succeeded by
Chungmok

In Popular Culture[edit]