Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy Houses

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Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy House
Immaculate Conception Church from west.jpg
(2011)
Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy Houses is located in New York City
Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy Houses
Location 406-414 E. 14th St., New York, New York
Coordinates 40°43′51″N 73°58′56″W / 40.73083°N 73.98222°W / 40.73083; -73.98222Coordinates: 40°43′51″N 73°58′56″W / 40.73083°N 73.98222°W / 40.73083; -73.98222
Built 1894-1896[2]
Architect J. Stewart Barney[3]
Architectural style French Gothic Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 80002681[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP March 28, 1980
Designated NYCL June 7, 1966

The Church of the Immaculate Conception and Clergy House at 406-412 East 14th Street between First Avenue and Avenue A in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City were built in 1894-96 by Grace Church, one of the most prominent Episcopal churches in the city at the time. The buildings were a free chapel – meaning there was no pew rent[2] – called Grace Chapel and a connected Grace Hospital, which could serve 16 senior citizens and 10 children, and was physically connected to the chapel by a bridge, so that patients could be wheeled to services.[3]

They were designed by J. Stewart Barney of the firm of Barney & Chapmen in French Gothic style. The firm was working at the same time on the Church of the Holy Trinity in Yorkville, which was also designed in the same style. Grace Chapel has stained-glass windows by Clayton & Bell and Henry Holiday. In 1943 both buildings were sold to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, and were converted for the use of the Immaculate Conception Church – founded in 1855 – as a sanctuary and Clergy House.[4]

The buildings were designated a New York City landmark in 1966, and were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

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Notes

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ a b New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; Postal, Matthew A. (ed. and text); Dolkart, Andrew S. (text). (2009) Guide to New York City Landmarks (4th ed.) New York:John Wiley and Sons. ISBN 978-0-470-28963-1, p.69
  3. ^ a b Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion. (2004) New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-12543-7, p.110
  4. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot (2000). AIA Guide to New York City (4th ed.). New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0-8129-3107-5. , p.210

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