Ciclovía

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Ciclovía in Bogotá

Ciclovía (/ˌsklɵˈv.ə/, Spanish: [θikloˈβi.a]), also ciclovia or cyclovia, is a Spanish term that means "cycleway", either a permanent bike path or the closing of certain streets to automobiles for cyclists and pedestrians,[1] a practice sometimes called open streets. [2]

Origins in Colombia[edit]

Each Sunday and public holiday from 7 am until 2 pm certain main streets of Bogotá, Cali, Medellín, and other municipalities are blocked off to cars for runners, skaters, and bicyclists. At the same time, stages are set up in city parks. Aerobics instructors, yoga teachers and musicians lead people through various performances. Bogotá's weekly ciclovías are used by approximately 2 million people (about 30% of the population) on over 120 km of car-free streets.[3]

The inspiration for Ciclovías is credited to Bogotá, Colombia.[3] The events have taken place since 1976 when they started through the efforts of organizer Jaime Ortiz and others. Some credit Bogotá Mayor Hernando Duran Dussan with starting Ciclovías in the early 1980s. Mayor Enrique Peñalosa deserves some credit for turning Bogotá into a safer cycling city by taking on the dominance of automobiles in the late 1990s.[citation needed] In Bogotá, permanently designated bikeways are also known as ciclorutas, while streets temporarily closed for that purpose are called ciclovías.

In 2007, a Colombian congressman, José Fernando Castro Caycedo, proposed a law banning Ciclovia, charging that it caused traffic jams. Ciclovia users protested the change, and received support from ex-mayors Peñalosa and Samuel Moreno, as well as several members of the city council and other congressmembers. The proposal was defeated.[4]

Ciclovía in other countries[edit]

Australia[edit]

On the Gold Coast, Queensland, the City of Gold Coast held the city's first Ciclovia dubbed "Bike and Street Fest" on 4 May 2014.[5] A section of Varsity Parade, Varsity Lakes was car-free for a four-hour celebration of bikes and all forms of active travel. The event included food stalls, street performers, live music and a BMX stunt show and attracted approximately 5000 visitors.

Bikepath to Weston Creek in the Suburbs of Canberra, part of the Australian Capital Territory

In Melbourne, the Moreland city council has held two Cyclovia events, on 28 May 2006 and 13 April 2008. A 4-kilometre (2.5 mi) section of the busy arterial Sydney Road was car-free for six hours. Bicycles and pedestrians filled the road, and trams also flowed as normal.[6] A smaller (1.5 km long) section of same road is closed off to trams as well as motorised vehicles for the Sydney Road Street Party in the late southern summer each year.

Argentina[edit]

Rosario was the first city in Argentina to hold an official Ciclovia, called Calle Recreativa. Each Sunday and holiday few important avenues of Rosario, are blocked off for the event to become carfree. From 8 am to 1 pm, runners, skaters and bicyclists take over the streets. Rosario's weekly ciclovías are used by approximately 30.000 thousand people on over 13 km of carfree streets.[7] Buenos Aires started its Ciclovías network in 2009, and as of 2013 it covers more than 100 km and continues expanding.

Belgium[edit]

Brussels hosted its first Cyclovia on August 21, 2011.[8] About 10 km of roads were totally or partially closed, with a course spanning from the Cinquantenaire Park throughout the centre of the city ending at the western boundary of the Small ring (Brussels). Another event is planned for September 11, 2011.The second Belgian Cyclovia will take place on the June 17, 2012.

Brazil[edit]

Walkable city streets are commonly closed on Sunday in major cities, one notable example being Avenida Atlântica in Copacabana, Rio De Janeiro.

Canada[edit]

Halifax held an event called Switch Open Streets on September 9, 2012 and planned to hold three more in 2013, beginning June 9, 2013. [3] The first Switch attracted approximately 35,000 people and the event aims to create community ownership so that it may take place on more Sundays every year.[4] In March 2012, Gil Penalosa visited Halifax.

Winnipeg was the first city in Canada to hold an official Ciclovia, on Sunday, September 13, 2009. The event saw thousands of people crowd Broadway on bikes, skateboards and on foot. The event was such a success that organizers, the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ, hope to make it an annual event.[9]

Vancouver will hold its first Ciclovias, called Vancouver LiveStreets, on June 26, 2011 and September 11, 2011. The events are a partnership between The City of Vancouver and the Vancouver Area Cycling Coalition (VACC).[10]

Calgary, Alberta has hosted the Bow River Flow since 2009. Most recently, on August 21, 2011, it saw the opening of two lanes of the Memorial Drive Parkway for thousands of Calgarians to enjoy dozens of participatory activities in a non-consumeristic street festival Bow River Flow. Organizers have proposed larger scale multi-day events for 2012.

Hamilton is holding its seventh Open Streets event, based on the Ciclovia movement on June 23, 2013. The event is organized by a group of community partners and invites people to walk ride or roll down town through over 2K of James St. N car free.

Ottawa has been the site of Ciclovías-type street closures since 1970. Every Sunday morning during the summer over 50 kilometres of roads in the heart of Ottawa and nearby Gatineau Park are reserved for cyclists, in-line skaters, runners, and pedestrians. This initiative is called the Sunday Bikedays Program.[11]

Costa Rica[edit]

A 5.8 km long ciclovía was built in the city of Cartago in 2012.[12]

Ecuador[edit]

The first Ciclopaseo in Quito took place in April 2003 [5] when the path was only 9.5 km and 3,000 people participated. At that point, Ciclopaseos were only held on the last Sunday of every month but the event grew in popularity. In six months the route had grown to 20 km with 25,000 participants.

The Ciclopaseo is a project organized by the local organization Ciclopolis to promote urban cycling, sustainable transportation, and community building in Quito. A route of 30 km running from the North to South of the city is closed to traffic every Sunday from 8 am until 2 pm to give preference to bicyclers and pedestrians.

The project was partially inspired by the Ciclopaseo in the neighboring capital of Bogota, Colombia. The mayor of Bogota, Antanas Mockus, rode alongside Quito's mayor, Paco Moncayo, in the second monthly Ciclopaseo of May, 2003. [6] The Ciclopaseo of June was the first themed event that emphasized children, followed by the event "Quito is for Everyone" in June, which featured the winners of the Special Olympics.

The Ciclopaseo began 2005 by doubling its frequency to every fifteen days [7] and in May 2009 became a weekly event and takes place every Sunday. [8]

Mexico[edit]

Mexico City has several circuits, the most important runs 59 kilometers from Polanco to Fierro del Toro; more information at the government's website. Guadalajara also has almost 60 kilometers of ciclovia routes named "Vía RecreActiva" (RecreActive Way) established for use Sundays 08:00 to 14:00.

New Zealand[edit]

Waiheke Island, about 17.7 km (about 35 minutes by ferry) from Auckland, has had two ciclovia events, in 2009 and 2010, when groups headed by Cycle Action Waiheke temporarily closed The Esplanade, a gravel road between Blackpool and Surfdale, to motor traffic.[13]

Christchurch held its inaugural "Open Streets" ciclovia on September 29, 2013 (postponed from July 14 due to bad weather). Approximately 3 km of streets in central Christchurch were closed to motor traffic for six hours, to celebrate the re-opening of the CBD earthquake cordon. A wide range of activities and demonstrations were held throughout the day, including bike fix-ups, public art displays, bike polo, urban orienteering, a bike parade, and numerous musicians and entertainers.[14]

Auckland launched its inaugural ciclovia on February 8, 2014. The city’s harbour edge from Britomart Place through to Silo Park in Wynyard Quarter was closed to publicise the ambition to turn Quay Street into a world-class boulevard, removing traffic from Quay Street and to encourage greater investment in cycling from Auckland Transport.[15]

Wellington held its inaugural Ciclovia on the Miramar Peninsula on February 16, 2014. 3.5 km of road were closed to traffic and opened to people on foot, bikes, scooters, skateboards and mobility scooters. The event showcased the Miramar Peninsula section of the Great Harbour Way/Te Aranui o Pōneke - a 72 km route around the perimeter of the Wellington harbour. Wellington's first Ciclovia was coordinated by the Great Harbour Way Trust, in collaboration with Cycle Aware Wellington, Living Streets Aotearoa and a local Rotary group. The event attracted 2,400 people and created support for future events.[16]

Peru[edit]

Lima now has a ciclovia. As one of the first programs undertaken by the administration of the Lima mayor Susana Villaran, the major road Avenida Arequipa is closed to motorized traffic every Sunday from 7am to 1pm, since February 2011.[17]

United States[edit]

Atlanta, Georgia held its first ciclovia called Atlanta Streets Alive on May 23, 2010. Road closures, totaling just under 2 miles (3.2 km), included Edgewood and Auburn Avenues in Downtown Atlanta. Approximately 6,000 people attended. A second event including a slightly expanded route was held on October 17, 2010. Atlanta has continued to host a series of closed streets events. There are total of four events planned for 2014. The most recent event, held on Highland Avenue in October 2013 attracted an estimated 82,000 people.[18]

Austin, Texas hosted its first ciclovia event on May 20, 2012 called "Viva! Streets Austin".[19]

Baltimore, Maryland hosts regular Ciclovias.[20]

Cambridge, Massachusetts has opened Memorial Drive to bicycle and pedestrian traffic only on Sundays from April to November since 1976.

Chicago, Illinois planned a ciclovia for two Sundays in October 2008.[21]

Clearwater, Florida hosted Sunday Ciclovía on March 1, 2009, and again on April 26, 2009, after the first event was cancelled due to severe weather. The event was initiated by the city's East Gateway District in downtown to encourage social interaction and community building among diverse population groups. Sunday Ciclovía hours were 8am to 2pm and the route was 2 miles (3.2 km) in length.

Cleveland, Ohio hosted two ciclovia-type events in August 2006 which were attended by approximately 10,000 people. The event was spearheaded by two individuals, Lois Moss and Julia Sutter, and was funded by a grant from the Cleveland Foundation's Civic Innovation Lab. In 2007, Walk+Roll Cleveland coordinated five community street-closing events and in 2008 the Walk+Roll program expanded to Lakewood, Ohio. For 2009, Walk+Roll is being held in two additional Cleveland neighborhoods. The events have been held on Saturdays and on Sundays and are generally in the mid-day rather than very early mornings. Additionally, the Walk+Roll organization has been helping communities all across the U.S. by providing guidance, information and consulting services on how to bring ciclovias to new locations.

Denver, Colorado, plays host to Viva Streets Denver, created by non-profits LiveWell Colorado and BikeDenver. Since 2011, the 1-day, car-free event in August each year has attracted 10,000[22] residents. The event has taken place in Park Hill (2011, 2012) and the Berkeley Regis neighborhood (2013). The goal of Viva Streets is to introduce the public to the many benefits that come from increased walking and biking in local communities, and highlight safe and active transportation.

Durham, North Carolina started its first ciclovia in 2010. Bull City Summer Streets [23]

El Paso, Texas ran a ciclovía each Sunday in May 2007.[24] The program has since been renamed Scenic Sundays (the events occur on Scenic Drive) and runs April through August.[25]

Fort Worth, Texas held Open Streets Fort Worth on October 23, 2011 on Magnolia, 5th Avenue, and Allen, and on October 30, 2011 on South Main, Broadway, and Jennings.[26]

Honolulu, Hawaii hosted the state's first Cyclovia "Hele On Kailua" in 2012, which is now an annual event. [27]

Ithaca, NY started hosting bi-annual ciclovias in 2012 and the event has grown in popularity and has been embraced by the community and its local organizations.

Las Cruces, New Mexico started holding ciclovîas on the last Sunday of each month, starting in March 2008. They were held at the city's Meerscheidt Recreation Center in 2008,[28] and in 2009 moved to Young Park.[29] Activities include biking, walking, dance, Wii, Bungee Run, aerobics, and weight training.[30] The Las Cruces ciclovías are put on by a partnership of the New Mexico Department of Health, New Mexico State University's Southern Area Health Education Center, the Cooperative Extension Service from NMSU's College of Agriculture and Home Economics, the City of Las Cruces, Southern New Mexico Diabetes Outreach, and the Doña Ana County Diabetes Action Coalition.[31][32]

The first "Iconic Wilshire" CicLAvia. Los Angeles, CA June 23, 2013.

Los Angeles, California had its first CicLAvia on October 10, 2010, starting at 10:10 a.m.. CicLAvias have been held two to three times a year ever since with an expanding variety of routes. The route always has a hub in Downtown Los Angeles and often branches out to iconic streets such as Wilshire Boulevard and Venice Boulevard. It is estimated that as many as 150,000 people attended the April 21, 2013 "CicLAvia to the Sea",[33] and it is considered the largest open streets event in the United States.[34]

Lincoln, Nebraska hosts an annual "Streets Alive!" event with health related vendors and entertainers along the route.[35]

Louisville, Kentucky hosts an annual event. cycLOUvia [36]

Madison, Wisconsin has continued to host the event twice each year since its first "Ride the Drive" event in August 2009. A circular path of streets is closed to automobile traffic and residents are encouraged to bike, walk, or rollerblade the loop. Family fun and fitness activities are offered at parks and businesses along the route.

Miami, Florida held its first ciclovia, called Bike Miami, [9] in 2008, as part of the City of Miami's Bicycle Action Plan. The event was created and hosted by the then-mayor, Manny Diaz, who decided to make it a monthly event. On March 14, 2009, the City of Miami became the first US city to host 5 cyclovias. The monthly event, called Bike Miami Days, is supposed to promote livable streets and community as well as cycling and walking.

Minneapolis, Minnesota held its first Open Streets [10] event in 2011, with the second in the following year.[37]

New Brunswick, NJ hosted its first ciclovia event on October 6, 2013 and is continuing to hold future ciclovia events.[38]

New York City currently runs a yearly ciclovia called SummerStreets. Started in 2008 and still-running as of 2013.,[39] almost seven miles (11 km) of road from 72nd st to the Brooklyn Bridge turns into a car-free route in the morning hours for three August Saturdays.[40]

Portland, Oregon has run several ciclovia, called "Sunday Parkways", having undertaken their first one on June 22, 2008, three in 2009, and five in 2010.[41] The City continues to host five Sunday Parkways events each year, one each month beginning in May. The event is from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and takes place in a different neighborhood each month of the summer through to September.[42]

Roanoke, Virginia held its first Ciclovia in 2009.[43][44]

San Antonio, Texas has held several such events.[45]

San Francisco, California hosted its first Ciclovia-styled events in 2008. Called "Sunday Streets" the events take place in different areas of the city.[46]

San Mateo County, California holds an event named "Streets Alive San Mateo County"—participating cities include Belmont, Brisbane, Foster City, Millbrae, North Fair Oaks, Redwood City, San Mateo, and South San Francisco. See http://streetsalivesmc.org/ for more information.

Spokane, Washington held Summer Parkways on July 11 and August 22, 2010. The events were presented jointly by the City, The Parks and Recreation Department, and the SpokeFest Association. It linked downtown Riverfront Park with Corbin Park, up Howard Street, for a total of 3 miles (4.8 km) of car-free activities.

Tucson, Arizona held its first cyclovia event on April 18, 2010.[47] It included the closure to motor vehicles of portions of four main bicycle arteries (4th Ave, University/3rd St, Mountain and Seneca), along with a variety of activities along the route.[47]

Wayne County, Michigan has held ciclovias on the Edward N. Hines Parkway since 1983. Called "Saturday in the Park," six miles (10 km) of the parkway are closed to motorized vehicles between Outer Drive Road and Ann Arbor Trail. These events are held from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on every Saturday from May through September.[48] Edward N. Hines was Chief Consul of the League of American Wheelmen (Bicyclists) Michigan Division during the 1890s and one of the most important innovators in road development.[49]

Israel[edit]

Cyclists ride down the deserted Ayalon Highway in Tel Aviv on Yom Kippur.

While not an officially organized cycling event, traffic in Israel stops (except for emergency vehicles) in observance of Yom Kippur. Cycling enthusiasts of the Hiloni stream and other religions take advantage of this, and roads (except in religious neighborhoods) become de facto cycleways. The days before Yom Kippur are the busiest of the year in bicycle stores. During Yom Kippur, emergency services often report an increase in calls for treatment for people who combined the customary fasting with physical overexertion.

India[edit]

Bangalore organizes Bangalore Cycle Day, a citizen's event, on the last Sunday of each month, since 2013. The event is jointly organized by various city based social organizations, along with Bangalore Traffic police and municipality. Each month, a different neighborhood of the city is identified, and motorized traffic is shutdown for about 1 hour. The roads are open to cyclists, joggers and skateboarders. There are also various street events, like games, competitions and other sit-down activities. About 250 cycles are provided for rent, which people can hire for the event free of cost.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Boulder Green Streets” “Ciclovías history” - Accessed June 23, 2012.
  2. ^ www.cicloviasrecreativas.org Retrieved July 17, 2012
  3. ^ a b "Car-Free Streets, a Colombian Export, Inspire Debate". The New York Times, Javier C. Hernandez, June 24, 2008. 2008-06-24. 
  4. ^ "Representative José Fernando Castro Caycedo dies during debate". Colombia Reports. 2008-05-08. Retrieved 2008-06-15. [dead link]
  5. ^ http://www.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/thegoldcoast/bike-fest-gold-coast-15642.html
  6. ^ Lucas, Clay (2008-04-14). "Two wheels rule on Sydney Road". Melbourne: The Age. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  7. ^ "Cambiá el aire! Calle Recreativa". 
  8. ^ "Op de fiets door Brussel met Cyclovia!". 
  9. ^ "Take To the Streets Winnipeg first Canadian city to stage Ciclovia". 
  10. ^ "Official Website". 
  11. ^ "National Capital Commission Bicycle Sunday website". 
  12. ^ "Automóvil Club de Costa Rica website". 
  13. ^ "Cycle Action Waiheke". Retrieved October 29, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Open Streets was a Blast! - Cycling in Chch". Retrieved October 3, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Ciclovia on quay". Retrieved February 6, 2014. 
  16. ^ http://www.ciclovia.org.nz/
  17. ^ "Apertura de la Ciclovía Recreativa de la Av. Arequipa". February 21, 2011. Retrieved October 29, 2011. 
  18. ^ http://www.atlantastreetsalive.com/past-events/#sthash.6JiK1dtt.dpbs
  19. ^ "Viva! Streets Austin". 
  20. ^ "Roland Park Ciclovia". Roland Park. Retrieved 2012-05-03. 
  21. ^ Holt, Tim (2008-08-18). "Traffic stoppers: An increasing number of cities are temporarily closing streets to cars and opening them to pedestrians and cyclists. It fosters a greater sense of community.". Christian Science Monitor. ISSN 0882-7729. Retrieved 2008-09-14. 
  22. ^ "Viva Streets Denver". 
  23. ^ "Dancing in the Bull City Streets". Durham Herald Sun. Retrieved 2010-05-24. 
  24. ^ "El Paso Ciclovia: Take the Parks to the Streets". City of El Paso. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  25. ^ "Scenic Sundays in El Paso". City of El Paso. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  26. ^ "Open Streets – Ciclovia-Style Car-Free Streets Days Coming in October to Fort Worth’s Near Southside". Fort Worthology. Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  27. ^ http://cycloviahawaii.org/
  28. ^ "City encourages Las Crucens to get active". Las Cruces Sun-News. 2008-03-27. ISSN 1081-2172. 
  29. ^ "Young Park is Ciclovia’s new home". Healthy U (Las Cruces Sun-News). January 2009. p. 22. 
  30. ^ "Health briefs". Las Cruces Sun-News. 2008-06-24. ISSN 1081-2172. 
  31. ^ Minnick, Chris J. (2008-03-25). "New programs to help families get off the couch". Las Cruces Sun-News. ISSN 1081-2172. 
  32. ^ Minnick, Chris J. "New programs to help families become more physically active". New Mexico Department of Health. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  33. ^ [1]
  34. ^ [2]
  35. ^ http://www.healthylincoln.org/streetsalive
  36. ^ "City sponsors first CycLOUvia event" (Press release). Louisville Metro Government. September 21, 2012. Retrieved October 12, 2012. 
  37. ^ "Open Streets MPLS". 
  38. ^ "New Brunswick Ciclovia". 
  39. ^ "Last Chance! The Final 2013 Edition of Summer Streets Is Tomorrow". Streetsblog. 2013-08-16. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  40. ^ "Mayor Bloomberg and DOT Commissioner Sadik-Khan announce "Summer Streets," a car-free city route for health and recreation" (Press release). New York City Department of Transportation. 2008-06-16. Retrieved 2008-07-15. 
  41. ^ "Sunday Parkways". Portland Office of Transportation. Retrieved 2008-07-12. 
  42. ^ "Sunday Parkways kicks off 2013 season this weekend on Mother’s Day". Metro Regional Government. Retrieved 2013-06-23. 
  43. ^ "Ciclovia: Turning Downtown Roanoke into a Public Park This Weekend". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved 2009-08-03. 
  44. ^ "2010 Excellence in Rural Transportation Awards". National Association of Development Organizations. Retrieved 2010-12-16. 
  45. ^ Síclovia 2011
  46. ^ http://sundaystreetssf.com
  47. ^ a b "Cyclovia Tuscson". cycloviatuson.org. 
  48. ^ "Saturday in the Park". Wayne County Parks. Retrieved 2009-07-18. 
  49. ^ Hines, Edward (May 11, 1899). "Edward Hines asks you to join the League". League of American Wheelmen Bulletin. Retrieved October 29, 2011. 

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