Cima Coppi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Cima Coppi is the title given to the highest peak in the yearly running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tour races.[1] The mountain that is given this title each year awards more mountains classification points to the first rider than any of the other categorized mountains in the race.[2] The categorization was first introduced for the 1965 Giro d'Italia in honor of the late Fausto Coppi who won five editions of the Giro d'Italia and three mountain classification titles during his career.[3] It was first announced on 22 April 1965 by then race director Vicenzo Torriani that the highest peak would award two times as many mountains classification points.[4] Torriani thought of possibly awarding time bonuses to the first to summit the mountain; however, after many dissenting opinions, he opted to go award more mountains classification points.[4]

The Cima Coppi changes from year to year, depending on the altitude profile of the Giro d'Italia, but the Cima Coppi par excellence is the Stelvio Pass, which is 2758 meters, the highest point ever reached by the Giro. The Stelvio Pass has been used in the 1972, 1975, 1980, 1994, 2005 and 2012 editions. It was also expected in 1965 and 1988 editions, but in each case the course was modified due to weather conditions. In 2009, the Cima Coppi initially set to 2068 m above sea level the Blockhaus, the 17th stage was set, because re-routing to 2035m of Sestriere.

List of past Cima Coppis[edit]

List of Cima Coppis
Year Mountain Pass Altitude First to Summit Ref(s)
1965 Passo dello Stelvio 1,958 m (6,424 ft)[N 1]  Graziano Battistini (ITA)
1966 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
1967 Tre Cime di Lavaredo 2,320 m (7,612 ft)  Felice Gimondi (ITA)
1968 Tre Cime di Lavaredo 2,320 m (7,612 ft)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
1969 Passo Sella 2,214 m (7,264 ft)  Claudio Michelotto (ITA)
1970 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Luciano Armani (ITA)
1971 Grossglockner 2,506 m (8,222 ft)  Pierfranco Vianelli (ITA)
1972 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
1973 Passo di Giau 2,236 m (7,336 ft)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
1974 Tre Cime di Lavaredo 2,320 m (7,612 ft)  José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
1975 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  Francisco Galdós (ESP)
1976 Vajolet Towers 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  Andrés Gandarias (ESP)
1977 Valparola Pass 2,200 m (7,218 ft)  Faustino Fernández Ovies (ESP)
1978 Passo Valles 2,033 m (6,670 ft)  Gianbattista Baronchelli (ITA)
1979 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Leonardo Natale (ITA)
1980 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  Jean-René Bernaudeau (FRA)
1981 Tre Cime di Lavaredo 2,320 m (7,612 ft)  Beat Breu (SUI)
1982 Col d'Izoard 2,361 m (7,746 ft)  Lucien Van Impe (BEL)
1983 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Marino Lejarreta (ESP)
1984 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Laurent Fignon (FRA)
1985 Passo del Sempione 2,005 m (6,578 ft)  Reynel Montoya (COL)
1986 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Pedro Muñoz (ESP)
1987 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Jean-Claude Bagot (FRA)
1988 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft) [N 2]
1989 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft) [N 3]
1990 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Maurizio Vandelli (ITA)
 Charly Mottet (FRA)
1991 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Franco Vona (ITA)
 Franco Chioccioli (ITA)
1992 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Claudio Chiappucci (ITA)
1993 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Miguel Indurain (ESP)
1994 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  Franco Vona (ITA)
1995 Colle dell'Agnello 2,744 m (9,003 ft) [N 4]
1996 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft)  Hernan Buenahora (COL)
1997 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  José Jaime González (COL)
1998 Passo Sella 2,214 m (7,264 ft)  Marco Pantani (ITA)
1999 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft)  José Jaime González (COL)
2000 Colle dell'Agnello 2,744 m (9,003 ft)  José Jaime González (COL) [6]
2001 Colle Fauniera 2,511 m (8,238 ft) [N 5] [7]
2002 Passo Pordoi 2,239 m (7,346 ft)  Julio Alberto Pérez Cuapio (MEX) [8]
2003 Colle d'Esischie 2,366 m (7,762 ft)  Fredy González (COL) [9]
2004 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft)  Vladimir Miholjević (CRO) [10]
2005 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  José Rujano (VEN) [11]
2006 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft)  Juan Manuel Gárate (ESP) [12]
2007 Colle dell'Agnello 2,744 m (9,003 ft)  Yoann Le Boulanger (FRA) [13]
2008 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft)  Julio Alberto Pérez Cuapio (MEX) [14][15]
2009 Sestriere 2,035 m (6,677 ft)[N 6]  Stefano Garzelli (ITA) [16]
2010 Passo di Gavia 2,621 m (8,599 ft)  Johann Tschopp (SUI) [17]
2011 Passo di Giau 2,236 m (7,336 ft)  Stefano Garzelli (ITA) [18]
2012 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  Thomas De Gendt (BEL) [19][20]
2013 Tre Cime di Lavaredo 2,320 m (7,612 ft)[N 7]  Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) [24]
2014 Passo dello Stelvio 2,758 m (9,049 ft)  Dario Cataldo (ITA) [25]
2015 Colle delle Finestre 2,178 m (7,146 ft)

References[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ The final 800 m (2,625 ft) of the climb were not scaled due to an avalanche on the course.
  2. ^ The Passo dello Stelvio was not climbed due to snow drifts that had developed on the roads.[5]
  3. ^ The stage containing the Cima Coppi was cancelled due to poor weather in 1989.
  4. ^ The stage containing the Cima Coppi was not scaled in 1995.
  5. ^ The stage containing the Cima Coppi was cancelled due to protests.
  6. ^ The original Cima Coppi was to be the Blockhaus, but due to excessive snow at the top of the climb, the stage was shortened and finished at a lower altitude than first planned.
  7. ^ The original Cima Coppi was to be the Passo dello Stelvio but due to weather the stage was cancelled.[21][22] With cancellation of the Passo di Stelvio, the climb to Tre Cime di Lavaredo became the Cima Coppi.[23]
Citations
  1. ^ Fotheringham 2009, p. 4-6.
  2. ^ Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  3. ^ McGann, Bill; McGann, Carol. "1965 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Gigi Boccacini (23 April 1965). "La tappa dello Stelvio decisiva per il Giro?" [The Stelvio Stage Decisive for the Tour?] (PDF). La Stampa (in Italian) (Editrice La Stampa). p. 8. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  5. ^ John Wilcockson (27 May 2012). "From the pages of Velo: Hampsten's Giro: 'I was so happy to survive'". VeloNews (Competitor Group, Inc). p. 1. Retrieved 23 June 2012. 
  6. ^ Gabriella Ekström (2000-06-01). "Pantani back but strange tactics". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  7. ^ Jeff Jones (2001-06-07). "Dies Irae?". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  8. ^ Tim Maloney (2002-05-29). "Evans takes over Maglia Rosa". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  9. ^ Chris Henry (2003-05-29). "Frigo returns, Garzelli crashes but hangs on to GC position". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  10. ^ Tim Maloney (2004-05-28). "Cunego clearly consolidates Giro lead in Bormio". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  11. ^ Tim Maloney (2005-05-22). "Parra does the double; Savoldelli still strong on Stelvio". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  12. ^ Cycling News (2005-05-27). "No more Mr. Nice Guy: Basso takes a(nother) leaf out of the Armstrong bible". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  13. ^ Gregor Brown and Tim Maloney (2007-05-24). "Di Luca takes day: Rosa and stage". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  14. ^ "Stage 20 - Saturday, May 31: Rovetta - Tirano, 224km". Cycling News. 2008-05-10. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  15. ^ Gregor Brown and Bjorn Haake (2008-05-31). "Contador one step closer to pink dream". Cycling News. Retrieved 2009-11-28. 
  16. ^ Laura Weislo (2009-05-19). "Complete live report". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 3 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-26. The climb of Sestrière offers an additional prize for Garzelli as it's the "Cima Coppi" – the highest peak of the Giro d'Italia. 
  17. ^ Bonnie D. Ford (7 May 2010). "2010 Giro: Storylines on our radar". ESPN.com (ESPN Internet Ventures). Retrieved 7 July 2010. 
  18. ^ Les Clarke (2011-05-22). "Two’s a treat for Nieve and Euskaltel-Euskadi". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Retrieved 2011-05-24. 
  19. ^ Westemeyer, Susan (26 May 2012). "De Gendt wins Giro d'Italia penultimate stage atop the Stelvio". Cycling News (Future Publishing Limited). Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  20. ^ Atkins, Ben (26 May 2012). "Thomas De Gendt soars to the foot of the podium with virtuoso Stelvio solo". VeloNation (VeloNation LLC). Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  21. ^ Farrand, Stephen (22 May 2013). "Race organisers RCS Sport expect to cut key climbs from mountain stages due to weather warnings". The Daily Telegraph (Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  22. ^ "Reactions to the cancellation of stage 19". Cyclingnews.com (Future plc). 24 May 2013. Retrieved 25 May 2013. 
  23. ^ Ryan, Barry (24 May 2013). "Giro d'Italia will reach Tre Cime di Lavaredo in spite of snow, says Vegni". Cyclingnews.com (Future plc). Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  24. ^ Atkins, Ben (25 May 2013). "Vincenzo Nibali attacks through the stage 20 blizzard to win on the Tre Cime". VeloNation (VeloNation LLC). Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  25. ^ Andrew Hood (27 May 2014). "UPDATED: Confusion over ‘neutralization’ throws Giro into chaos". VeloNews (Competitor Group, Inc). Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
Bibliography