Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey

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Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Cinnaminson
Motto: "Building Our Future... Together"
Cinnaminson Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Cinnaminson Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°00′01″N 74°59′30″W / 40.000162°N 74.991632°W / 40.000162; -74.991632Coordinates: 40°00′01″N 74°59′30″W / 40.000162°N 74.991632°W / 40.000162; -74.991632[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 15, 1860
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor William Young (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Frank Locantore[4]
 • Clerk Pamela McCartney[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 8.061 sq mi (20.876 km2)
 • Land 7.505 sq mi (19.437 km2)
 • Water 0.556 sq mi (1.439 km2)  6.89%
Area rank 232nd of 566 in state
23rd of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 79 ft (24 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 15,569
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 16,763
 • Rank 162nd of 566 in state
10th of 40 in county[11]
 • Density 2,074.5/sq mi (801.0/km2)
 • Density rank 288th of 566 in state
14th of 40 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08077[12][13]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 303, 786, 829[14]
FIPS code 3400512940[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882096[17][2]
Website www.cinnaminsonnj.org

Cinnaminson Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. Cinnaminson Township borders the Delaware River, and is an eastern suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 15,569,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 974 (+6.7%) from the 14,595 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 12 (+0.1%) from the 14,583 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Cinnaminson was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 15, 1860, from portions of Chester Township (now known as Maple Shade Township and having no connection to the Morris County community that still bears that name). Portions of the township were taken to form Delran Township (February 12, 1880), Riverton (December 18, 1893) and Palmyra (April 19, 1894).[19]

Geography[edit]

Cinnaminson Township is located at 40°00′01″N 74°59′30″W / 40.000162°N 74.991632°W / 40.000162; -74.991632 (40.000162,-74.991632). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 8.061 square miles (20.876 km2), of which, 7.505 square miles (19.437 km2) of it was land and 0.556 square miles (1.439 km2) of it (6.89%) was water.[1][2]

Cinnaminson includes within its boundaries the confluence point of longitude 75 degrees west and latitude 40 degrees north, one of only four such confluence points in New Jersey. The intersection point is on the 4th fairway of the Riverton Country Club Golf Course, less than ½ mile from the Municipal Building.[20][21]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 2,701
1870 3,112 15.2%
1880 2,184 * −29.8%
1890 2,891 32.4%
1900 1,078 * −62.7%
1910 1,266 17.4%
1920 1,587 25.4%
1930 2,277 43.5%
1940 2,504 10.0%
1950 3,144 25.6%
1960 8,302 164.1%
1970 16,962 104.3%
1980 16,072 −5.2%
1990 14,583 −9.3%
2000 14,595 0.1%
2010 15,569 6.7%
Est. 2013 16,763 [10] 7.7%
Population sources:
1860-2000[22] 1860-1920[23]
1860-1870[24] 1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 15,569 people, 5,535 households, and 4,351 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,074.5 per square mile (801.0 /km2). There were 5,758 housing units at an average density of 767.2 per square mile (296.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 89.48% (13,931) White, 5.49% (855) Black or African American, 0.08% (13) Native American, 2.38% (370) Asian, 0.02% (3) Pacific Islander, 0.98% (153) from other races, and 1.57% (244) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.07% (478) of the population.[7]

There were 5,535 households, of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.2% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.4% were non-families. 18.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.18.[7]

In the township, 22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 20.1% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.5 years. For every 100 females there were 96.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,470 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,827) and the median family income was $98,579 (+/- $6,301). Males had a median income of $70,565 (+/- $7,423) versus $47,340 (+/- $3,291) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,104 (+/- $2,329). About 3.9% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 14,595 people, 5,057 households, and 4,141 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,920.4 people per square mile (741.5/km²). There were 5,147 housing units at an average density of 677.3 per square mile (261.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.36% White, 5.08% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.88% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 1.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% of the population.[30][31]

There were 5,057 households out of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.5% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.1% were non-families. 15.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.18.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 25.5% from 45 to 64, and 19.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $68,474, and the median income for a family was $75,920. Males had a median income of $57,122 versus $41,286 for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,863. About 1.4% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Cinnaminson Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Cinnaminson Township Committee are Mayor William "Ben" Young (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2013; term on committee ends 2014), Deputy Mayor Anthony V. Minniti (R, 2014), Donald Brauckmann (R, 2015), Kathleen M. Fitzpatrick (R, 2013) and John McCarthy (R, 2015).[4][33][34][35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Cinnaminson Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[8][38][39]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[43][44]

The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[48] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[48] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[49] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[50] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[51] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[52] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[53][48][54] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[55]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for grades Kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[56]) are New Albany Elementary School[57] with 492 students in grades K - 2, Eleanor Rush Intermediate School[58] with 534 students in grades 3 - 5, Cinnaminson Middle School[59] with 551 students in grades 6 - 8 and Cinnaminson High School[60] with an enrollment of 733 students in grades 9 through 12.[61][62] The Project Challenge program is a program for gifted students from grades 2 through 8 who attend New Albany Elementary School, Eleanor Rush Intermediate School and Cinnaminson Middle School, where students can learn more while having fun. Project Challenge was conceived by Elaine Mendelow, a teacher in the district, who taught it for over 20 years, now being retired from the program.[63]

Students from Cinnaminson Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[64]

Cinnaminson Township is home to several private schools. The historic Westfield Friends School, which serves students from PreK-8th grade, is a Quaker school founded in 1788.[65] St. Charles Borromeo Parish School serves about 300 students in PreK-8th grade from several area communities, operating as part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton.[66][67]

History[edit]

Cinnaminson was formed by resolution in 1860 from a section of Chester Township. Part of this resolution reads, "The inhabitants of the township of Chester having become so numerous that it is impracticable for them to meet with convenience and good order in one assembly... the Township shall be divided." The name "Cinnaminson" derives from the Lenape Native American word "Senamensing," which means "sweet water".[68]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 80.63 miles (129.76 km) of roadways, of which 67.47 miles (108.58 km) are maintained by the municipality, 9.29 miles (14.95 km) by Burlington County and 3.87 miles (6.23 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[69]

Roads traveling through the township include Route 73, Route 90, U.S. Route 130, and County Route 543.

Public transportation[edit]

The Cinnaminson station located on Broad Street[70] offers southbound service on the River Line light rail system to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (with transfers available to the PATCO Speedline) and northbound service to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to New Jersey Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Amtrak trains.[71]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 409 and 417 route between Trenton and Philadelphia, and on the 419 route between Camden and Burlington.[72][73]

BurLink bus service is offered on the B9 route (between the Palmyra station and the Moorestown Mall and the B10 route (between Cinnaminson station and Route 130 / Union Landing Road).[74]

Community[edit]

Since 1900, Cinnaminson has been home to the Riverton Country Club, a country club and golf course designed by Donald Ross.[75]

Cinnaminson is home to the Burlington County Footlighters, a production company founded in 1938 who perform regularly at a playhouse within the township.[76] Additionally, Cinnaminson facilitates an all-ages regional chorus and wind ensemble.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Cinnaminson Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Administrative Directory, Cinnaminson Township. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Cinnaminson, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Cinnaminson township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Cinnaminson township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cinnaminson, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Cinnaminson, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 7, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 95. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  20. ^ 40°N 75°W (visit #2), confluence.org. Accessed November 27, 2007.
  21. ^ 40°N 75°W Confluence Point information and pictures
  22. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 264, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 9, 2013. "Cinnaminson township contained in 1860 a population of 2,701, and in 1870, 3,112. Bridgeborough, Cinnaminson, Riverside and Palmyra are in this township contained."
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 9, 2013. Population of Burlington Township is listed as 7,237 for 1880 and 8,222 for 1890, inclusive of the population of Burlington city of 6,090 in 1880 and 7,264 in 1890, with the township's population calculated via subtraction.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Cinnaminson township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Cinnaminson township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Cinnaminson township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 18, 2012.
  33. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Cinnaminson Township. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  34. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 11, 2012. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  35. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 18, 2011. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  36. ^ November 2, 2010 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 23, 2010. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  46. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ a b c Staff. Board of Chosen Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  49. ^ Bruce Garganio, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  50. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  51. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  52. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  53. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  54. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  55. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Garganio again to head Burlco Freeholder Board", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 29, 2014. Accessed July 27, 2014. "The new director of the Burlington County Freeholder Board is Bruce Garganio, a Republican who led the five-member board for three years before he was defeated in his bid for reelection in November 2011.... Two weeks ago, the county Republican Committee tapped Garganio to fill the one-year vacancy that was created after Leah Arter resigned as freeholder director."
  56. ^ Data for the Cinnaminson Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  57. ^ New Albany Elementary School, Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  58. ^ Eleanor Rush Intermediate School, Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  59. ^ Cinnaminson Middle School, Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  60. ^ Cinnaminson High School, Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  61. ^ District Profile, Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  62. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Cinnaminson Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  63. ^ Welcome to Project Challenge, Cinnaminson Township Public Schools. Accessed April 27, 2011.
  64. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  65. ^ About Westfield, Westfield Friends School. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  66. ^ At a Glance, St. Charles Borromeo Parish School. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  67. ^ Schools Directory, Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  68. ^ Our History, Cinnaminson Township. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  69. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  70. ^ Cinnaminson station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  71. ^ River LINE System Map, New Jersey Transit. Accessed September 2, 2013.
  72. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 22, 2013.
  73. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 22, 2013.
  74. ^ BurLink Schedules, Cross County Connection. Accessed November 23, 2013.
  75. ^ History, The Riverton Country Club. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  76. ^ "Footlighters Spotlighted by 50th Anniversary Gala", copy of article from The Philadelphia Inquirer, 1988. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  77. ^ 2004 Hall of Fame Samuel Leeds Allen, New Jersey Inventor's Hall of Fame. Accessed September 2, 2013. "In 1861, Allen moved to Ivystone, a farm, which his father owned, near the village of Westfield in Cinnaminson Township, New Jersey."
  78. ^ Staff. "Childress glad to stay in S. Jersey", Courier-Post, April 13, 2012. Accessed September 2, 2013. "Not only was Brad Childress named as the new offensive coordinator on coach Andy Reid's staff for the Eagles, but the promotion assured that Childress' son, Kyle, would be returning for his senior year next season at Cinnaminson."
  79. ^ Araton, Harvey. "SUPER BOWL XXVI; Family Strength by the Numbers", The New York Times, January 23, 1992. June 18, 2012. "'People come up to me, say they've wanted to meet me and ask for my autograph,' Frances Collins said this week in an interview from her home in Cinnaminson, N.J., a town outside Philadelphia. 'I sign all my autographs the same: Frances Collins, mother of 19.'"
  80. ^ Jim DeRose, Bradley University athletics. Accessed June 18, 2012. "A native of Cinnaminson, N.J., DeRose brings enthusiasm, a hard-work ethic and popularity to The Hilltop."
  81. ^ Moore, Tom. "DiLeo on the defensive", Bucks County Courier Times, May 13, 2009. Accessed February 7, 2011. "DiLeo, a Cinnaminson High School graduate who still lives there, said he's looking forward to spending more time with his wife, Anna, and sons TJ and Max."
  82. ^ Staff. "Dr. Dorrance Dead; Food Firm's Head; Founder of the Campbell Company and Originator of Canned Soup Industry. Rejected Offers From Three Universities and a College to Join Their Faculties. Worked in Paris Restaurants. Director in Many Corporations", The New York Times, September 22, 1930. Accessed June 18, 2012. "Dr. John T. Dorrance, president and founder of the Campbell Soup Company and originator of the canned soup industry, died of heart disease today at his home, Pomona Farm, at Cinnaminson, NJ, in his fifty-seventh year."
  83. ^ Larry Ferrari: Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia, Broadcast Pioneers. Accessed December 12, 2006.
  84. ^ Staff. "Larry Ferrari", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 21, 1997. Accessed June 18, 2012. "Larry Ferrari, 65, a Philadelphia institution who played the organ on his own show on Channel 6 for 40 years, died yesterday of cancer at his home in Cinnaminson."
  85. ^ Biography, Nat Gertler: Freelance Writer - Comis Gut], November 23, 2013. "His earlier years were spent in Cinnaminson, NJ; Simsbury, CT; and Riverton, NJ, where he stayed long enough to consider it his hometown."
  86. ^ Narducci, Marc. "Cinnaminson's Hazell realizes dream: An assistant at Ohio State for the last seven seasons, he will be head coach at Kent St.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 22, 2010. Accessed June 18, 2012. "Since graduating from Cinnaminson in 1982, Darrell Hazell has always had the goal of one day becoming a head college football coach."
  87. ^ Patrick Herron, Poets & Writers. Accessed June 18, 2012. "Born in: Camden, NJ. Raised in: Cinnaminson, NJ".
  88. ^ Colimore, Edward. "New Historic Trust leader sees urban sites as a priority Barbara Haney Irvine of Cinnaminson also aims to collaborate with the preservation community.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 5, 2004. Accessed November 23, 2013. "Barbara Haney Irvine said after the announcement of her appointment that she wanted "to build on the strong foundation that the trust has built over the years and expand the program to impact" the urban sites.Irvine, 60, of Cinnaminson, was unanimously approved by the trust's board, the state Department of Community Affairs announced yesterday."
  89. ^ Michelle Kosinski: General Assignment Reporter, WTVJ. Accessed July 19, 2007. "A native of Cinnaminson, New Jersey, Kosinski considers herself a news junkie, but she also fulfilled her love for theater through performing lead roles in two plays with the 'Piedmont Players' while in North Carolina."
  90. ^ Gross, Dan. "Dan Gross: Ed, new squeeze brunch at Parc", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 26, 2011. Accessed June 18, 2012. "NBC News foreign correspondent Michelle Kosinski and long-distance boyfriend/auto mogul Carlos Hoz de Vina spent a rare night together at Parc Saturday. The Cinnaminson-raised Kosinski lives in London, Miami and New York; Hoz de Vina splits his time among Moorestown, New York and South America."
  91. ^ Narvaez, Alfonso A. "Official in Jersey Indicted on Gifts In '77 Campaign; Accused of Violating Law in Drive to Elect Byrne 'Distressing' to Byrne Indictment Called Improper Jersey Official Is Indicted by State", The New York Times, March 20, 1980. Accessed December 2, 2013. "The indictment charges that on May 12, 1977, Mr. Lee, a 49-year-old resident of Cinnaminson, collected $500 in cash contributions from then Assemblyman Kenneth Gewertz..."
  92. ^ Burton, Cynthia. "Ex-Flyer tosses puck into ring All-star left winger Brian Propp has a new goal: A seat in the state Assembly.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 6, 2007. Accessed June 18, 2012. "Brian Propp, a longtime Flyer and five-time NHL all-star, is entering a new arena: state politics.... Both assembly seats in this district, which includes Propp's home of Cinnaminson, Edgewater Park and Mount Holly, have been held by since the late 1990s."
  93. ^ Staff. "Walter N. Read; Casino Commission Chairman, 83", The New York Times, January 1, 2002. Accessed June 18, 2012. "Walter N. Read, a lawyer and former chairman of the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, died on Dec. 22 at his home in Cinnaminson, N.J. He was 83."
  94. ^ Seife, Charles. "Spin Doctor: Nobel Physicist Joseph Taylor Takes the "Pulse" of Dying Stars", Princeton Alumni Weekly, October 11, 1995. Accessed October 26, 2007. "Born in Philadelphia in 1941, he grew up on a peach farm in Cinnaminson, New Jersey, that has been in his family for more than two centuries -"a plot of green," he recalls, in the industrial belt along the Delaware River north of Camden."

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Preceded by
Delran Township
Bordering communities
of Philadelphia
Succeeded by
Riverton