Cisco Systems VPN Client

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Cisco Systems VPN Client
Vpngui.png
Cisco VPN Client on Windows 7.
Developer(s) Cisco Systems
Stable release
  • Windows - 5.0.07.0440[1] / March 15, 2011 (2011-03-15)
  • Mac OS X - 4.9.01.0180[2] / February 5, 2009 (2009-02-05)
Preview release 4.9.01.0230 for Mac / July 27, 2010 (2010-07-27)
Operating system Windows, Mac OS X 10.4 and 10.5, Solaris UltraSPARC, Linux (Intel)[3]
Size
  • x86 - 7.63 MB
  • x64 - 4.78 MB
Available in English
Type VPN software
License Proprietary
Website cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/secursw/ps2308/

The Cisco Systems VPN Client was a software application for connecting to a virtual private network. The client makes remote resources of another network available in a secure way as if the user was connected directly to that "private" network.[4]

In July 29, 2011, Cisco announced the end of life of the product. No further product updates were released after July 30, 2012, and support have ceased in July 29, 2014.[5] A suggested migration option for customers is the Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client.[6]

Installation[edit]

The client is normally distributed with an executable installer and profile file(s), which contain all the necessary information to easily connect to a network.

A .pcf (or profile configuration file) is used to configure the VPN client for connecting to the remote server.

Availability[edit]

The software is not free but is often installed on university and business computers in accordance with a site-license. As with most corporate licenses, administrators are allowed to freely distribute the software to users within their network.

Compatibility[edit]

VPN Client 4.9.01.0230 beta added support for Mac OS X 10.6.[7] Stable version 4.9.01.0180 appears to lack that support; 4.9.00.0050 explicitly did not support versions of Mac OS X later than 10.5.[8]

VPN Client 5.0.07.0290 added support for 64-bit versions of Windows Vista and Windows 7.[9]

Security[edit]

The client uses profile files (.pcf) that store VPN passwords either hashed with type 7, or stored as cleartext. A vulnerability has been identified,[10] and those passwords can easily be decoded using software or online services.[11] To work around these issues, network administrators are advised to use the Mutual Group Authentication feature, or use unique passwords (that aren't related to other important network passwords).[10]

See also[edit]

Virtual private network Internet privacy Cisco Systems

References[edit]