Cissus

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For other uses, see Cissus (disambiguation).
Cissus
Starr 071024-9714 Cissus nodosa.jpg
Cissus nodosa
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Vitales
Family: Vitaceae
Subfamily: Vitoideae
Genus: Cissus
L.[1]
Species

About 350, see text

Cissus verticillata

Cissus is a genus of approximately 350 species of woody vines in the grape family (Vitaceae). They have a cosmopolitan distribution, though the majority are to be found in the tropics.

Uses[edit]

Medicinal[edit]

Cissus quadrangularis has been evaluated for potential medical uses. As a source of carotenoids, triterpenoids and ascorbic acid the extracts may have potential for medical effects, including "gastroprotective activity"[2] and benefits in terms of "lipid metabolism and oxidative stress".[3] Cissus quinquangularis was used by the Maasai people of Kenya to relieve some of the symptoms of malaria.[4]

Ornamental[edit]

Cissus antarctica and C. alata are cultivated as garden plants.

Ecology[edit]

Cissus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Hypercompe eridanus and Hypercompe icasia.

Taxonomy[edit]

The generic name is derived from the Greek word κισσος (kissos), meaning "ivy".[5] In the 1980s the genus was split according to some details of the flower. The large caudiciform species were moved to the new genus Cyphostemma.

Selected species[edit]

Formerly placed here[edit]

Image gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cissus L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2006-04-03. Retrieved 2010-07-07. 
  2. ^ Jainu, M; Mohan, K; Devi, C (2006). "Protective effect of Cissus quadrangularis on neutrophil mediated tissue injury induced by aspirin in rats". Journal of Ethnopharmacology 104 (3): 302–5. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2005.08.076. PMID 16338111. 
  3. ^ Oben, Julius E; Enyegue, Damaris; Fomekong, Gilles I; Soukontoua, Yves B; Agbor, Gabriel A (2007). "The effect of Cissus quadrangularis (CQR-300) and a Cissus formulation (CORE) on obesity and obesity-induced oxidative stress". Lipids in Health and Disease 6: 4. doi:10.1186/1476-511X-6-4. PMC 1800848. PMID 17274828. 
  4. ^ Bussmann, Rainer W; Gilbreath, Genevieve G; Solio, John; Lutura, Manja; Lutuluo, Rumpac; Kunguru, Kimaren; Wood, Nick; Mathenge, Simon G (2006). "Plant use of the Maasai of Sekenani Valley, Maasai Mara, Kenya". Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine 2: 22. doi:10.1186/1746-4269-2-22. PMC 1475560. PMID 16674830. 
  5. ^ Eggli, Urs (2002). Illustrated Handbook of Succulent Plants. 5: Dicotyledons. Springer. p. 452. ISBN 978-3-540-41966-2. 
  6. ^ a b "Species Records of Cissus". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-07-07. 
  7. ^ "Cissus". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 7 July 2010. 

External links[edit]