Civil Courage Prize

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The Civil Courage Prize is a human rights award which recognizes "steadfast resistance to evil at great personal risk — rather than military valor."[1] The prize was founded in 2000 by the Northcote Parkinson Fund.[1] The goal of the prize is not to create a "ranking", but "to draw attention individually to some extraordinary heroes of conscience."[2] It was inspired by the example of Soviet dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn.[3]

In 2007, the Northcote Parkinson Fund's name was changed to the The Train Foundation in recognition of the contributions of the family of investment advisor John Train, the fund's primary donor.[1][4]

In 2012, the board of trustees consisted of eight members:[2]

Since 2000, the foundation has awarded the Civil Courage Prize one or two activists each year.[5] The prize comes with a $50,000 honorarium.[6][3] Nominations are accepted from international non-governmental organizations, while unsolicited nominations are discouraged.[2] The award ceremony is held in New York City or London in October of each year.[3][6][7] Keynote speakers have included British historian Michael Howard,[8] US journalist Jon Meacham,[7] British Home Secretary Douglas Hurd,[8] and Chilean President Michelle Bachelet.[8]

Seven posthumous award winners have also been named, ranging from Swedish businessman Raoul Wallenberg, who worked to save the lives of Hungarian Jews during World War II, to Indonesian human rights activist Munir Said Thalib, assassinated in 2004.[9] In 2004 and 2005, the Foundation also awarded "Certificates of Distinction in Civil Courage" to selected prize finalists. The certificates included honorariums of $1,000 apiece.[10]

Honorees[edit]

Year Honorees Country Ref.
2000 Nataša Kandić Flag of Serbia.svg Serbia [5]
2001 Paul Kamara  Sierra Leone [5]
2002 Vladimiro Roca Antúnez  Cuba [5]
2003 Shahnaz Bukhari  Pakistan [5]
2004 Emadeddin Baghi  Iran [5]
Lovemore Madhuku  Zimbabwe [5]
2005 Min Ko Naing  Burma [5]
Anna Politkovskaya  Russia [5]
2006 Rafael Marques de Morais  Angola [5]
2007 Phillip Buck  United States [5]
2008 Ali Salem  Egypt [5]
2009 Aminatou Haidar  Western Sahara [5]
2010 Andrew White  England [5]
2011 Lydia Cacho Ribeiro  Mexico [5]
Triveni Acharya  India [5]
2012 Yu Jie  China [6]

Posthumous honorees[edit]

Honorees Year of death Country Ref.
Dietrich Bonhoeffer 1945  Germany [9]
Giovanni Falcone 1992  Italy [9]
Abdul-Latif Ali al-Mayah 2004  Iraq [9]
Rosemary Nelson 1999  Ireland [9]
Munir Said Thalib 2004  Indonesia [9]
Neelan Tiruchelvam 1999  Sri Lanka [9]
Raoul Wallenberg 1947  Sweden [9]

Certificates of Distinction in Civil Courage[edit]

Honoree Year of death Country Ref.
2004 Dan Que Nguyen  Vietnam [10]
Arnold Tsunga  Zimbabwe [10]
Raphael Wakenge  Democratic Republic of the Congo [10]
2005 Rajan Hoole  Sri Lanka [10]
Kopalasingam Sritharan  Sri Lanka [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Civil Courage Prize". Civil Courage Prize. 2012. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "About Us: The Train Foundation". Civil Courage Prize. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "Egyptian Playwright Awarded Prize for Fight for Peace". Fox News. November 20, 2008. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  4. ^ Mike Collett-White (November 19, 2008). "Egypt author Ali Salem receives courage award". Reuters. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Honorees". Civil Courage Prize. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c Hsiao Boa-hsiang and Sofia Wu (July 17, 2012). "Chinese dissident writer wins Civil Courage Prize". FocusTaiwan. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "Canon Andrew White Wins 11th Annual Civil Courage Prize". ReligionWriters. October 12, 2010. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c "Remarks by Keynote Speakers". Civil Courage Prize. 2012. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h "Posthumous Recognition". Civil Courage Prize. 2012. Archived from the original on 11 August 2012. Retrieved 11 August 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Certificates of Distinction in Civil Courage". Civil Courage Prize. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 

External links[edit]