Clariosophic Society

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Henry William Ravenel
Hugh S. Legaré
Wade Hampton III
John Murphy, fourth governor of Alabama

The Clariosophic Society, also known as MΣΦ (Mu Sigma Phi), is a literary society founded in 1806 at the University of South Carolina, then known as South Carolina College, as a result of the splitting in two of the Philomathic Society, which had been formed within weeks of the opening of the college in 1805 and included virtually all students. At what was called the Synapian Convention held in February, 1806, the members of Philomathic voted to splt into two separate societies, one of which became known as Clariosophic, while the other became known as Euphradian. Two blood brothers picked the members for the new groups in a manner similar to choosing up sides for an impromptu baseball game. John Goodwin became the first president of Clariosophic Other early presidents include Stephen Elliott, Hugh S. Legaré. George McDuffie and Richard I. Manning.[1]

Latin Diploma and key[edit]

Applicants who had fulfilled all the requirements for membership were given the society's Latin Diploma along with its key to signify their membership. Somewhere along the way, the giving of keys ceased but the key still appeared on the diplomas, The key was shaped like a rhombus or lozenge except that the sides did not meet at the top and bottom, but were blunted off. The front had two overlapping hearts at the top with the Greek letters, Mu Sigma Phi (MΣΦ,) in the center and the initials C.S., for Clariosophic Society, at the bottom. The reverse side had the two hearts at the top and two Greek words beginning with the letters, Delta and Phi (ΔΦ) in the center and the initials S.C.C, for South Carolina College, at the bottom,

Notable Members 19th Century[edit]

Notable members of the 19th Century include:[2]

Notable Members 20th Century[edit]

External links[edit]

Resources[edit]

  • Haygood, Tamara Miner (2006). Henry William Ravenel, 1814-1887 South Carolina scientist in the Civil War Era, Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.
  • Hollis, Daniel Walker (1951). University of South Carolina, volume I: South Carolina College, Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hollis, Daniel Walker (1951). University of South Carolina, volume I: South Carolina College. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, pp.230-233.
  2. ^ South Carolina College: Clariosophic Society, Catalogue of Members in 1842, Lanham Digital Library of Hill Country History at Logan Library at Schreiner University
  3. ^ Haygood, Tamara Miner (2006). Henry William Ravenel, 1814-1887 South Carolina scientist in the Civil War Era, Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press
  4. ^ Seibels family papers, 1780-1960 at University of South Carolina - South Caroliniana Library
  5. ^ Alumnus donates $1 million for financial aid - News