Clark's anemonefish

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Clark's anemonefish
Amphiprion clarkii.jpg
Clark's anemonefish with sea anemone
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Superclass: Osteichthyes
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Pomacentridae
Subfamily: Amphiprioninae
Genus: Amphiprion
Species: A. clarkii
Binomial name
Amphiprion clarkii
Bennett, 1830

Amphiprion clarkii, known commonly as Clark's anemonefish and yellowtail clownfish, is a marine fish belonging to the family Pomacentridae, the clownfishes and damselfishes.[1]

Description[edit]

Clark's anemonefish is a small-sized fish which grows up to 10 cm as a male and 15 cm as a female.[2] It is stocky, laterally compressed, and oval to rounded.

It is colorful, with vivid black, white, and yellow stripes, though the exact pattern shows considerable geographical variation. Usually it is black dorsally and orange-yellow ventrally, the black areas becoming wider with age.[3] There are two vertical white bands, one behind the eye and one above the anus, and the caudal peduncle is white. The snout is orange or pinkish. The dorsal and tail fins are orange-yellow,[4] and the tail fin is generally lighter in tone than the rest of the body, sometimes becoming whitish.[5] Juveniles are orange-yellow with vertical white bands.[4]

Distribution[edit]

Clark's anemonefish is widely distributed in tropical waters from the Indo-West Pacific.[6]

Habitat[edit]

The adult inhabits lagoons and outer reef slopes. It lives in association with about ten species of sea anemones:

Feeding[edit]

Clark's anemonefish is omnivorous and its diet is based on zooplankton and algaes.[7]

Amphiprion clarkii sipadan.jpg

Behaviour[edit]

The fish is diurnal. It is a protrandous hermaphrodite, the male often changing sex to become a female. A male may keep a harem. The fish is also aggressive and territorial.[8] Without a host, Clark's anemonefish stays close to rockwork.[8] Otherwise, it is dependent on sea anemones to provide a habitat and nesting sites. The fish has a mucous coat to protect it from anemone stings. It is a mutualistic relationship. The clownfish helps to attract prey items close to the anemone's tentacles, and helps to defend it from tentacle-eating predators, such as butterflyfishes.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species - Amphiprion clarkii (Bennett, 1830)". Marinespecies.org. Retrieved 2014-01-27. 
  2. ^ Lougher, Tristan (2006). What Fish?: A Buyer's Guide to Marine Fish. Interpet Publishing. p. 13. ISBN 0-7641-3256-3. "What size? Males maximum 4 in (10 cm), females maximum 5 7/8 in (15 cm)" 
  3. ^ a b c By Padgette' Steer. "ADW: Amphiprion clarkii: INFORMATION". Animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-27. 
  4. ^ a b "SOUS LES MERS : Amphiprion clarkii - poisson-clown de Clark". Fran.cornu.free.fr. Retrieved 2014-01-27. 
  5. ^ "Facts about Clark's Anemonefish (Amphiprion clarkii) - Encyclopedia of Life". Eol.org. 2013-02-14. Retrieved 2014-01-27. 
  6. ^ "Facts about Clark's Anemonefish (Amphiprion clarkii) - Encyclopedia of Life". Eol.org. 2013-02-14. Retrieved 2014-01-27. 
  7. ^ "Facts about Clark's Anemonefish (Amphiprion clarkii) - Encyclopedia of Life". Eol.org. 2013-02-14. Retrieved 2014-01-27. 
  8. ^ a b Lougher, Tristan (2006). What Fish?: A Buyer's Guide to Marine Fish. Interpet Publishing. p. 13. ISBN 0-7641-3256-3. "In the absence of an anemone, the fish remains close to rockwork. Otherwise, it stays with its host, wherever it is located.... Clarke's anemonefish is a belligerent species when large, attacking anything that threatens its anemone" 

External links[edit]