Clark and Michael

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Clark and Michael
ClarkAndMichael.jpg
Clark and Michael title screen
Created by Clark Duke
Michael Cera
Directed by Michael Cera
Clark Duke
Max Winkler
Starring Clark Duke
Michael Cera
Ending theme "Black Out" by British Sea Power
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of episodes 10[1]
Production
Executive producer(s) Matt Kaplan
Producer(s) Michael Cera
Clark Duke
Seth Grahame-Smith
David Katzenberg
Max Winkler
Editor(s) Michael Cera
Taylor Chien
Clark Duke
Running time approx. 10 minutes[2]
Broadcast
Original channel CBS (distributed online)
Original run May 23  – July 25, 2007 (2007-07-25)

Clark and Michael is a CBS Internet television series created by and starring Clark Duke and Michael Cera. The series takes the form of a mockumentary following Duke and Cera's ambitions to write and sell a pilot for a television series.

Style[edit]

Duke and Cera play fictionalized versions of themselves, Cera describing the characters as "more idiotic and more deluded".[3] The series is a low-budget affair, filmed on handheld cameras by friends of the duo.[4] The cameras are acknowledged by Clark, Michael and others, who will sometimes address them or those operating them; in one scene, an upset Michael shouts a cameraman out of the bathroom, after which Clark angrily points out to the crew that their contract states "no bathroom stuff". Boom mics are often visible, and the crew have also intervened in fights between Clark and Michael.[5]

Plot[edit]

Clark and Michael's ambition of producing their own television series is stated in the opening of the first episode, and forms the drive of the series. After being turned down initially, the pair come to terms with the fact that success will not be instantaneous, and continue to pursue new opportunities. Though their agent succeeds in scheduling a meeting to discuss their show with another network, Clark's drunken behavior changes their mind about picking up the show. Following this, the pair has a meeting with agent Ramsay, who recommends that Michael be made the "hero" of the series. Bothered by this, Clark reveals an idea for his own series, D.A. Dad, to the crew, and begins pursuing the concept.

Some time later, the pair are watching television together when they see an ad for D.A. Dad. Clark reacts angrily, explaining that the show was his and the concept had been taken and produced by someone else. Michael is hurt that Clark would work separately from him, but the pair eventually reconcile their differences and their arrangement returns to normal. Michael takes up driving lessons, and takes an interest in one of his fellow students. The pair try to get Kenny Loggins to perform the theme song for their show, but can't get in touch with him. Michael only barely passes his driving test, and Clark informs him that he won't be driving his car. Regretting this overreaction, he makes it up to Michael with a game of minigolf. A meeting with another potential network ends poorly, unbeknownst to the two, when their arrogant behavior in general makes a bad impression on the executives. Clark soon makes it into Columbia University, and plans to move to New York to attend. Yet Clark ultimately decides against university when they achieve their TV show dream, with CBS signing them up (as well as in real life).

Guest stars[edit]

Several guest stars have made appearances in the series:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Michael Cera and Clark Duke – Exclusive Video Interview". Collider.com. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  2. ^ "Clark And Michael". Clark And Michael. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  3. ^ Chattman, Jon. "welcome to thecheappop.com...your daily dose of pop culture and mustache envy » Blog Archive » Arrested Development’s Michael Cera". Thecheappop.com. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  4. ^ "Wired 15.03: Snack Attack!". Wired.com. 2009-01-04. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  5. ^ "Clark And Michael". Clark And Michael. Retrieved 2012-07-24. 

External links[edit]