Clash (magazine)

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Clash
Clash (magazine) cover.jpg
Cover from December 2011 edition
Editor Simon Harper
Categories Music magazine
Frequency monthly
First issue 2004
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Website www.clashmusic.com
ISSN 1743-0801

Clash is a popular music and fashion magazine and website based in the United Kingdom. It is published 10 times a year by Music Republic Ltd.[1] after Clash Music Ltd went into liquidation.

The brand's content alternates between modern bands such as The Horrors, Florence & The Machine and Jamie xx as well as hip-hop artists like DJ Shadow, Kanye West and Beastie Boys, who have all had cover spots in recent issues.[1] It concentrates on music and fashion, and often their effect on surrounding culture, as well as film and technology.

The magazine won the Best New Magazine award in 2004 at the PPA Magazine Awards and has won further awards in England and Scotland. Most notably, it won Magazine Of The Year at the 2011 Record Of The Day Awards.

At the turn of 2011, Clash took on an entirely new look, ditching the previous glossy feel and music led design, for an altogether more led approach. In 2013 Clash launched a Smartphone channel which went on to win 'Best Music Magazine' at the Digital Magazine Awards for their IOS Apple Magazine App. In February 2014 it expanded onto Android Handsets.

The publication is based around the larger Clash brand, which extends to live events around the country and festival partnerships/parties (such as RockNess, Snowbombing, SXSW), and the website, ClashMusic.com. 2011 saw Clash partner Levi's and Spotify to bring Primal Scream to London's Electric Brixton for one of their final shows with the former Stone Roses member, Mani.

The Clash Live brand's London activity used to incorporate a once-monthly club night at The Lexington, based around their tastemaking Ones To Watch section, which has played host to acts including Swimming, Three Trapped Tigers, Alpines and Wild Palms. More recently this activity re-branded to be called 'Next Wave' in order to reflect internal changes in the magazine and now enjoys a residency at Hackney's new Oslo venue.

History[edit]

Clash magazine was bred out of long running free listings magazine Vibe based in Dundee, Scotland. Re-launching as Clash Magazine in 2004[2] it won Best New Magazine award at the PPA Magazine Awards and Music Magazine of the Year – Record of the Day Awards 2005 and 2011.[3]

Founders[edit]

  • Iain Carnegie - Art Director
  • Jon-Paul Kitching - Advertising Director
  • Simon Harper - Editor
  • John O'Rourke - Publisher

[2]

Staff[edit]

  • Editor-in-Chief: Simon Harper
  • Deputy Editor: Joe Zadeh
  • Head of Digital Content: Matthew Bennett
  • Client Director: Matt Goodwin
  • ClashMusic.com Editor: Mike Diver
  • ClashMusic.com Deputy Editor: Robin Murray
  • Creative Director: Rob Meyers – RBPM Studio
  • Art Editor: Anthony Chapman
  • Film Editor: Ben Hopkins
  • Business Development Co-ordinator: Anna Wilson
  • Staff Writers: Anna Wilson, Ben Murphy, Adam Park, Tristan Parker

Full credits available in Clash magazine.[volume & issue needed]

ClashMusic.com[edit]

ClashMusic.com launched in early 2008. The website often encompasses a wider variety of genres than its parent magazine, with pieces on left field acts like Gonjasufi and Perfume Genius, as well as emerging artists, appearing alongside content that ties in with magazine-featured artists. The website features numerous ongoing features such as "DJ Disasters", "Rapture & Verse" and "A Letter From...". It runs a Track of the Day feature from Monday to Friday.

The website enjoyed a redesign, bringing it in line with the look of the print magazine, in October 2012.

Clash Essential 50[edit]

On 30 March 2009, ClashMusic began publishing the Essential 50 – fifty albums which the website considered "the 50 greatest, most significant, downright brilliant albums of Clash's lifetime".[4] Made up entirely of albums released in the past five years,[5] the list was published in sections of three, with the top ten being released individually between 15–24 April 2009.[5][6] The list contained Arctic Monkeys, Bloc Party, Portishead and Radiohead amongst others, culminating in Arcade Fire's Funeral being named number one.[5]

Awards[edit]

  • Music Magazine of the Year - Digital Magazine Awards 2013[1][7]
  • Magazine of the Year - Record Of The Day Awards 2011[1][8]
  • Magazine of the Year - PPA Scotland Magazine Awards 2008[1][9][10]
  • Consumer Magazine of the Year - PPA Scotland Magazine Awards 2008[1][9][10]
  • Consumer Magazine Editor of the Year - PPA Scotland Magazine Awards 2007[1]
  • Best Magazine Design of the Year - PPA Scotland Magazine Awards 2007[1]
  • Music Magazine of the Year - Record Of The Day Awards 2005[1]
  • Best New Magazine - PPA Scottish Magazine Awards 2004[3]

ClashMusic.com was nominated for Best Music Magazine and Best Podcast at the 2008 BT Digital Music Awards.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Clash Magazine - Issue 77". Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b http://www.scottishmusiccentre.com/news/1055/
  3. ^ a b http://www.musicweek.com/news/read/clash-magazine-wins-scotlands-ppa-awards/033610
  4. ^ Diver, Mike (2009-03-30). "Clash Essential 50 – 50-47". ClashMusic.com. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  5. ^ a b c Diver, Mike (2009-04-24). "Clash Essential 50 – Number 1". ClashMusic.com. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  6. ^ Diver, Mike (2009-04-15). "Clash Essential 50 – Number 10". ClashMusic.com. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  7. ^ "Digital Magazine Awards". Retrieved 18 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "2011 Record of the Day Awards for Music Journalism and PR winners". Retrieved 17 July 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Clash Magazine Scoops Top Prizes at the PPA Scotland Magazine Awards". PRWeb. December 2, 2008. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Clash Magazine Awards Sweep". Clash. November 28, 2008. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Vote For Clash! At the BT Digital Music Awards 08". Clash Music Ltd. September 17, 2008. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 

External links[edit]