Claudia Roden

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Claudia Roden in the chair at the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, 2012

Claudia Roden is a cookbook writer and cultural anthropologist based in the United Kingdom.[1][2][3][4][5] She was born in 1936 in Cairo, Egypt.[1] After completing her formal education in Paris, she moved to London to study at Saint Martin's School of Art.[6][7] She is best known as the author of Middle Eastern cookbooks including A Book of Middle Eastern Food, The New Book of Middle Eastern Food and Arabesque—Sumptuous Food from Morocco, Turkey and Lebanon.[2][3][5][7][8]

She has also been a food writer and a cooking show presenter on the BBC.

She now lives in Hampstead Garden Suburb, London.[2]

Roden is a Patron of London-based HIV charity The Food Chain.[9] She is co-chair with Paul Levy of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery. She is an Honorary Fellow of the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London.[6]

Claudia Roden (right) and Paul Levy (centre) among panellists at the Oxford Symposium, 2006

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Claudia Roden | Jewish Women's Archive". Jwa.org. 2009-03-20. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  2. ^ a b c Rachel Cooke (2012-03-18). "Claudia Roden: interview | Life and style | The Observer". London: Guardian. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  3. ^ a b "YaleNews | Renowned Food Writer Claudia Roden To Serve Up Lecture at Yale". News.yale.edu. 2010-10-12. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  4. ^ Camas, Joanne. "A Conversation with Claudia Roden at". Epicurious.com. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  5. ^ a b "Activities". Prince Claus Fund. 2011-12-17. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  6. ^ a b Ms Claudia Roden, Honorary Fellow, SOAS, University of London. SOAS. Accessed July 2013.
  7. ^ a b Claudia Roden (2010-03-24). "Claudia Roden from HarperCollins Publishers". Harpercollins.com. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  8. ^ Weigel, David. "Claudia Roden's new cookbook, Arabesque, an excellent primer on the Middle East. - Slate Magazine". Slate.com. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  9. ^ "our patrons". The Food Chain. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2012-03-27.