Clavey River

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Coordinates: 37°51′50″N 120°06′59″W / 37.86389°N 120.11639°W / 37.86389; -120.11639[1]

The Clavey River is a tributary of the Tuolumne River, about 31.4 miles (50.5 km) long,[2] located in Tuolumne County, California. The Clavey's headwaters originate in the Emigrant Wilderness in the Stanislaus National Forest. Uniquely, it flows north-south, which is exceptional for a west-slope river in the Sierra Nevada mountains. The river makes a sweeping right-hand turn at Jawbone Ridge prior to joining forces with the main stem of the Tuolumne River. The confluence of the two rivers, known as Clavey Falls, provides a thrilling landmark to rafters and kayakers heading downstream.

This river is also unique because it still harbors a pre-glacial remnant population of coastal rainbow trout. It is also one of the few undammed rivers in California, despite the many attempts to do so by the Turlock Irrigation District; and it has some of the best swimming holes in all of California. The Clavey is also special because it has some of the highest biotic integrity of any river in California; that is, it remains in relatively good condition.

A multi-stakeholder group known as the Clavey River Ecosystem Project (CREP) is currently developing a baseline study and recommendations for the preservation of the Clavey.

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Clavey River
  2. ^ U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed March 11, 2011

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