Clay County, Kansas

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Clay County, Kansas
Map of Kansas highlighting Clay County
Location in the state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.
Founded February 20, 1857
Named for Henry Clay
Seat Clay Center
Largest city Clay Center
Area
 • Total 655.44 sq mi (1,698 km2)
 • Land 643.84 sq mi (1,668 km2)
 • Water 11.60 sq mi (30 km2), 1.77%
Population
 • (2010) 8,535
 • Density 13.4/sq mi (5.2/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website claycountykansas.org

Coordinates: 39°21′N 97°10′W / 39.350°N 97.167°W / 39.350; -97.167

Clay County (county code CY) is a county located in North Central Kansas, in the Central United States. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 8,535.[1] Its county seat and most populous city is Clay Center.[2]

History[edit]

19th century[edit]

When the first counties were created by the Kansas legislature in 1855, the territory within the present limits of the county was attached to Riley County for all revenue and judicial purposes. Subsequently Clay was attached to Geary County. In 1857, Clay was created and named in honor of the famous American statesman Henry Clay,[3] a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky and United States Secretary of State in the 19th century.

In 1887, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway built a branch line from Neva (3 miles west of Strong City) to Superior, Nebraska. This branch line connected Strong City, Neva, Rockland, Diamond Springs, Burdick, Lost Springs, Jacobs, Hope, Navarre, Enterprise, Abilene, Talmage, Manchester, Longford, Oak Hill, Miltonvale, Aurora, Huscher, Concordia, Kackley, Courtland, Webber, Superior. At some point, the line from Neva to Lost Springs was pulled but the right of way has not been abandoned. This branch line was originally called "Strong City and Superior line" but later the name was shortened to the "Strong City line". In 1996, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway merged with Burlington Northern Railroad and renamed to the current BNSF Railway. Most locals still refer to this railroad as the "Santa Fe".

21st century[edit]

In 2010, the Keystone-Cushing Pipeline (Phase II) was constructed north to south through Clay County, with much controversy over tax exemption and environmental concerns (if a leak ever occurs).[4][5] A pumping station named Riley was built along the pipeline.

Law and government[edit]

Although the Kansas Constitution was amended in 1986 to allow the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with the approval of voters, Clay County has remained a prohibition, or "dry", county.[6]

Geography[edit]

2005 KDOT Map of Clay County (map legend)

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 655.44 square miles (1,697.6 km2), of which 643.84 square miles (1,667.5 km2) (or 98.23%) is land and 11.60 square miles (30.0 km2) (or 1.77%) is water.[7]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Sources: National Atlas,[8] U.S. Census Bureau[9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 163
1870 2,942 1,704.9%
1880 12,320 318.8%
1890 16,146 31.1%
1900 15,833 −1.9%
1910 15,251 −3.7%
1920 14,365 −5.8%
1930 14,556 1.3%
1940 13,281 −8.8%
1950 11,697 −11.9%
1960 10,675 −8.7%
1970 9,890 −7.4%
1980 9,802 −0.9%
1990 9,158 −6.6%
2000 8,822 −3.7%
2010 8,535 −3.3%
Est. 2012 8,531 [10] 0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
2012 estimate

As of the U.S. Census in 2000,[12] there were 8,822 people, 3,617 households, and 2,517 families residing in the county. The population density was 14 people per square mile (5/km²). There were 4,084 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.72% White, 0.57% Black or African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.26% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.83% of the population.

There were 3,617 households out of which 30.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.90% were married couples living together, 6.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 27.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.90% under the age of 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 23.90% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 20.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 99.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $33,965, and the median income for a family was $41,103. Males had a median income of $28,817 versus $17,760 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,939. About 6.80% of families and 10.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.60% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[edit]

Incorporated cities[edit]

Name and population (2004 estimate):

Unincorporated places[edit]

  • Athelstane
  • Bateham
  • Broughton
  • Browndale
  • Exeter
  • Fact
  • Fancy Creek
  • Garfield Center
  • Gatesville
  • Idana
  • Industry
  • Ladysmith
  • Northern (no longer exists)
  • Republican City

Townships[edit]

Clay County is divided into eighteen townships. The city of Clay Center is considered governmentally independent and is excluded from the census figures for the townships. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Athelstane 02950 144 2 (4) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.03% 39°10′17″N 97°12′35″W / 39.17139°N 97.20972°W / 39.17139; -97.20972
Blaine 07050 259 2 (6) 109 (42) 1 (0) 0.94% 39°20′38″N 97°11′11″W / 39.34389°N 97.18639°W / 39.34389; -97.18639
Bloom 07325 125 1 (3) 122 (47) 1 (0) 0.53% 39°26′29″N 97°16′51″W / 39.44139°N 97.28083°W / 39.44139; -97.28083
Chapman 12525 Longford 202 2 (6) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.09% 39°10′21″N 97°19′35″W / 39.17250°N 97.32639°W / 39.17250; -97.32639
Clay Center 13650 368 4 (10) 98 (38) 1 (1) 1.46% 39°21′30″N 97°6′17″W / 39.35833°N 97.10472°W / 39.35833; -97.10472
Exeter 22100 81 1 (2) 94 (36) 0 (0) 0.08% 39°15′24″N 97°11′36″W / 39.25667°N 97.19333°W / 39.25667; -97.19333
Five Creeks 23475 159 2 (4) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.04% 39°21′22″N 97°18′14″W / 39.35611°N 97.30389°W / 39.35611; -97.30389
Garfield 25500 107 1 (3) 91 (35) 0 (0) 0.05% 39°31′55″N 97°7′5″W / 39.53194°N 97.11806°W / 39.53194; -97.11806
Gill 26250 140 2 (5) 78 (30) 0 (0) 0.04% 39°10′10″N 97°6′3″W / 39.16944°N 97.10083°W / 39.16944; -97.10083
Goshen 27025 92 1 (3) 91 (35) 0 (0) 0% 39°31′4″N 97°0′14″W / 39.51778°N 97.00389°W / 39.51778; -97.00389
Grant 27500 132 2 (5) 74 (29) 13 (5) 14.83% 39°16′12″N 96°59′27″W / 39.27000°N 96.99083°W / 39.27000; -96.99083
Hayes 30875 206 2 (6) 92 (36) 0 (0) 0% 39°26′9″N 97°5′58″W / 39.43583°N 97.09944°W / 39.43583; -97.09944
Highland 31825 Green 310 3 (9) 92 (35) 0 (0) 0.07% 39°25′28″N 97°0′1″W / 39.42444°N 97.00028°W / 39.42444; -97.00028
Mulberry 49000 Clifton (part) 331 3 (9) 97 (38) 2 (1) 1.99% 39°32′19″N 97°16′23″W / 39.53861°N 97.27306°W / 39.53861; -97.27306
Oakland 51725 110 1 (3) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0% 39°15′30″N 97°20′21″W / 39.25833°N 97.33917°W / 39.25833; -97.33917
Republican 59025 Wakefield 1,024 14 (36) 73 (28) 10 (4) 12.46% 39°12′7″N 97°0′50″W / 39.20194°N 97.01389°W / 39.20194; -97.01389
Sherman 64850 Morganville 328 4 (10) 85 (33) 1 (0) 1.00% 39°30′15″N 97°12′42″W / 39.50417°N 97.21167°W / 39.50417; -97.21167
Union 72075 140 2 (4) 92 (35) 0 (0) 0.38% 39°16′16″N 97°4′53″W / 39.27111°N 97.08139°W / 39.27111; -97.08139
Sources: "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. 

People[edit]

See List of people from Clay County, Kansas

Two former Kansas Governors resided in Clay County. George Docking was the 35th Governor, serving from January 14, 1957 until January 9, 1961.[13] William H. Avery was the 37th Governor, from January 11, 1965 until January 9, 1967.[14]

Education[edit]

Unified school districts[edit]

See also[edit]

Information on this and other counties in Kansas

Other information for Kansas

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010 County Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 31, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 83. 
  4. ^ Keystone Pipeline - Marion County Commission calls out Legislative Leadership on Pipeline Deal; April 18, 2010.
  5. ^ Keystone Pipeline - TransCanada inspecting pipeline; December 10, 2010.
  6. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2004. Retrieved 2007-01-21. 
  7. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  8. ^ National Atlas
  9. ^ U.S. Census Bureau TIGER shape files
  10. ^ U.S. County 2012 Estimated Census; census.gov
  11. ^ U.S. Decennial Census; census.gov
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ "To Seek Third Term". The Fort Scott Tribune. May 2, 1970. Retrieved March 30, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Former Kan. Gov. Avery dies at the age of 98". Associated Press. November 5, 2009. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Official sites
Additional information
Maps