Clayton, Indiana

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Town of Clayton, Indiana
Town
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Coordinates: 39°41′22″N 86°31′22″W / 39.68944°N 86.52278°W / 39.68944; -86.52278Coordinates: 39°41′22″N 86°31′22″W / 39.68944°N 86.52278°W / 39.68944; -86.52278
Country United States
State Indiana
County Hendricks
Township Liberty
Area[1]
 • Total 0.76 sq mi (1.97 km2)
 • Land 0.76 sq mi (1.97 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 876 ft (267 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 972
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 986
 • Density 1,278.9/sq mi (493.8/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EST (UTC-5)
ZIP code 46118
Area code(s) 317
FIPS code 18-13366[4]
GNIS feature ID 0432598[5]
Website www.townofclaytonin.org

Clayton is a small town in Liberty Township, Hendricks County, Indiana, United States located on State Road 39, between Danville, Plainfield and Mooresville with easy access to Interstate 70. The population was 972 at the 2010 Census.

History[edit]

In 1829 a little town in Liberty Township was named Clayville, honoring Henry Clay, the Kentucky statesman. In 1835, Clayville consisted of ten houses and 43 people. The Town of Clayville was platted in 1851 by George W. Wills.[6] However, the name was changed to Clayton in 1858 because another Clayville already existed in Dubois County.

The first two houses in Clayton were built by Thomas Potts and Lewis T. Pounds, and Parker & Foote was the first store. George Wills built the first hotel and John Miles and James Worrell developed the first flouring mill. The first train passed through in 1852. By the early 1900s, the town had electric service, supplied by the Danville Light, Heat and Power Co.

The first schoolhouse built in Clayton was erected in 1867. In the spring of 1868, Howard Mitchell started a subscription school in the new building. It was not until 1897 the first high school of the township was built in Cartersburg. In the fall of 1901 the high school was transferred to Clayton, which made it nearer the middle of the township and the center of the school population.

In 1909 the town was incorporated and had a population of 497.

Geography[edit]

Clayton is located at 39°41′22″N 86°31′22″W / 39.68944°N 86.52278°W / 39.68944; -86.52278 (39.689427, -86.522752).[7]

According to the 2010 census, the town has a total area of 0.76 square miles (2.0 km2), all land.[1]

Cityscape[edit]

Lambert Park in Clayton is home to the Fall Festival and "Movies in the Park" on Friday evenings.

Entertainment[edit]

The Clayton Cafe's Friday night fish fry has people lined up and out the door.

Clayton is known for its annual Fall Festival sponspored by the Clayton Community Association in September featuring horse pulls, tractor pulls, live bands, food, kid's games, bingo, a parade and more. Clayton also sponsors the annual "Triple F Ride" in June which is a non-profit bike rally starting in Lambert Park.

Education[edit]

Mill Creek School Corporation is a four star school system, three of their four schools are located in the Town of Clayton: Mill Creek East Elementary, Cascade Middle School and Cascade High School.

Cascade High School, home of the Cadets, has a very well developed athletic program.

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 972 people, 358 households, and 255 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,278.9 inhabitants per square mile (493.8/km2). There were 383 housing units at an average density of 503.9 per square mile (194.6/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.7% White, 0.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population.

There were 358 households of which 39.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.9% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 28.8% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.24.

The median age in the town was 34.3 years. 29% of residents were under the age of 18; 8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27% were from 25 to 44; 25.5% were from 45 to 64; and 10.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 51.4% male and 48.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 693 people, 258 households, and 199 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,394.7 people per square mile (535.1/km²). There were 270 housing units at an average density of 543.4 per square mile (208.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.41% White, 0.14% African American, 0.29% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.72% of the population.

There were 258 households out of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.7% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 20.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the town the population was spread out with 30.0% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $45,066, and the median income for a family was $47,039. Males had a median income of $40,417 versus $24,500 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,387. About 2.8% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Places: Indiana". 2010 Census Gazetteer Files. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-04-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Hadley, John Vestal (1914). History of Hendricks County, Indiana: Her People, Industries and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. p. 85. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 

External links[edit]