Clayton, New Jersey

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Clayton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Clayton
Motto: "A great place to live and play to work and pray!"
Map of Clayton highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Clayton highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Clayton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Clayton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°39′50″N 75°04′39″W / 39.663756°N 75.077505°W / 39.663756; -75.077505Coordinates: 39°39′50″N 75°04′39″W / 39.663756°N 75.077505°W / 39.663756; -75.077505[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated February 5, 1858 (as township)
Reincorporated May 9, 1887 (as borough)
Government[7]
 • Type Borough (New Jersey)
 • Mayor Thomas Bianco (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Administrator Sue Miller[5]
 • Clerk Christine Newcomb[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 7.334 sq mi (18.994 km2)
 • Land 7.140 sq mi (18.492 km2)
 • Water 0.194 sq mi (0.502 km2)  2.64%
Area rank 237th of 566 in state
15th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 8,179
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 8,216
 • Rank 282nd of 566 in state
13th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density 1,145.5/sq mi (442.3/km2)
 • Density rank 362nd of 566 in state
13th of 24 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08312[14][15]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 307, 442, 863, 881[16]
FIPS code 3401513360[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885185[19][2]
Website www.claytonnj.com

Clayton is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,179,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 1,040 (+14.6%) from the 7,139 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 984 (+16.0%) from the 6,155 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Jacob Fisler, who purchased much of the area that is now Clayton, established a community called Fislertown in 1850 that grew substantially after he opened a glass factory.[21] What is now Clayton was originally formed as Clayton Township, which was created on February 5, 1858, from portions of Franklin Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Glassboro Township on March 11, 1878. Clayton was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 9, 1887, from portions of Clayton Township. The remainder of Clayton Township was absorbed by the Borough of Clayton on April 14, 1908, and the township was dissolved.[22]

Geography[edit]

Clayton is located at 39°39′50″N 75°04′39″W / 39.663756°N 75.077505°W / 39.663756; -75.077505 (39.663756,-75.077505). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 7.334 square miles (18.994 km2), of which, 7.140 square miles (18.492 km2) of it was land and 0.194 square miles (0.502 km2) of it (2.64%) was water.[1][2]

Clayton borders Glassboro, Elk Township, Franklin Township, and Monroe Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 2,490
1870 3,674 47.6%
1880 1,981 −46.1%
1890 2,299 16.1%
1900 1,989 −13.5%
1910 1,926 −3.2%
1920 1,905 −1.1%
1930 2,351 23.4%
1940 2,320 −1.3%
1950 3,023 30.3%
1960 4,711 55.8%
1970 5,193 10.2%
1980 6,013 15.8%
1990 6,155 2.4%
2000 7,139 16.0%
2010 8,179 14.6%
Est. 2013 8,216 [12] 0.5%
Population sources:
1860-2000[23] 1860-1920[24]
1860-1870[25] 1870[26] 1880-1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,179 people, 2,916 households, and 2,105 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,145.5 per square mile (442.3/km2). There were 3,128 housing units at an average density of 438.1 per square mile (169.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 74.83% (6,120) White, 18.01% (1,473) Black or African American, 0.37% (30) Native American, 1.80% (147) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 1.59% (130) from other races, and 3.39% (277) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.95% (487) of the population.[9]

There were 2,916 households, of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 22.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.27.[9]

In the borough, 26.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.2 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.1 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,299 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,649) and the median family income was $70,989 (+/- $5,101). Males had a median income of $52,048 (+/- $6,973) versus $39,524 (+/- $6,308) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,437 (+/- $2,649). About 9.6% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.9% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 7,139 people, 2,464 households, and 1,884 families residing in the borough. The population density was 994.2 people per square mile (383.9/km2). There were 2,680 housing units at an average density of 373.2 per square mile (144.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 79.23% White, 16.05% African American, 0.42% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.95% from other races, and 2.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.28% of the population.[31][32]

There were 2,464 households out of which 39.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 13.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.5% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.31.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $53,219, and the median income for a family was $63,097. Males had a median income of $37,231 versus $29,063 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,006. About 3.1% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Clayton is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7]

As of 2014, the Mayor of the Borough of Clayton is Democrat Tom Bianco, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Tony Saban (D, 2016), Brian Bicking (D, 2015), Sandra "Sandi" Kraus (D, 2016), Chris Rogers (D, 2015), Charles Simon (D, 2014) and Darlene Vondran (D, 2014).[34][35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Clayton is located in the 2nd Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[10][37][38]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[42][43]

The 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton).[44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2014, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; term ends December 31, 2015),[47] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 2015),[48] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2014),[49] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2016),[50] Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2016),[51] Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2014)[52] and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township; 2014).[53][54][55][56] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan,[57] Surrogate Helene M. Reed (Monroe Township)[58] and Sheriff Carmel Morina (Greenwich Township).[59][60][55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,874 registered voters in Clayton, of which 1,755 (36.0%) were registered as Democrats, 819 (16.8%) were registered as Republicans and 2,296 (47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[61]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.1% of the vote here (2,270 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 35.8% (1,309 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (49 votes), among the 3,653 ballots cast by the borough's 5,090 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.8%.[62] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 54.5% of the vote here (1,745 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 44.6% (1,427 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (16 votes), among the 3,201 ballots cast by the borough's 4,410 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.6.[63]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 48.2% of the vote here (1,055 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 39.8% (871 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 9.1% (200 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (17 votes), among the 2,191 ballots cast by the borough's 4,947 registered voters, yielding a 44.3% turnout.[64]

Education[edit]

The Clayton Public Schools serve students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,258 students and 105.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.98:1.[65] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[66]) are Herma S. Simmons Elementary School[67] for grades PreK-5 (723 students), Clayton Middle School[68] (285 students in grades 6-8) and Clayton High School[69] (250 students in grades 9-12).[70][71]

In September 2009, voters approved a referendum that covered a $20 million renovation and expansion project at the middle school / high school.[72]

Formed as the result of the merger of two regional schools in 2007, St. Michael the Archangel Regional School is an elementary school serving students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade that operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[73][74]

Transportation[edit]

The main thoroughfare that passes through is Route 47. Route 55 traverses in the southwestern edge briefly, but the closest interchange are in its neighboring communities. A sliver of CR 553 clips the western edge of the borough.

The borough had a total of 44.16 miles (71.07 km) of roadways, of which 33.00 miles (53.11 km) are maintained by the municipality, 8.36 miles (13.45 km) by Gloucester County and 2.80 miles (4.51 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[75]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available between the borough and Philadelphia on the 313 and 408 routes.[76]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Clayton include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Meet the Mayor: Tom Bianco, Clayton Borough. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough & Assistant Borough Administrators, Borough of Clayton. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Clayton. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 19.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Clayton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Clayton borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Clayton borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Clayton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Clayton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  21. ^ The History of the Borough of Clayton, Borough of Clayton. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 137. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1810 - 2010, WestJersey.org. January 6, 2011. Accessed November 6, 2012. As both Clayton Township and Clayton Boorough co-existed, the population statistics for 1890 (1,807 for borough; 492 for township) and 1900 (1,951 for borough; 38 for township) reflect the combined totals for both municipalities.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  25. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 256, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 8, 2013. "Clayton township in 1860 contained a population of 2,490, and in 1870 3,674. This township was formed from Franklin in 1858."
  26. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 258. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed October 8, 2013. Population is listed for the whole township of 1,981 in 1880 and 2,299 in 1890, and for the borough within the township of 1,433 in 1880 1,807 in 1890.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Clayton borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Clayton borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Clayton borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  34. ^ Government, Borough of Clayton. Accessed August 24, 2014.
  35. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Clayton. Accessed August 24, 2014.
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  40. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  43. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ Robert M. Damminger, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  48. ^ Giuseppe (Joe) Chila, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  49. ^ Lyman Barnes, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  50. ^ Daniel Christy, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  51. ^ Frank J. DiMarco, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  52. ^ Heather Simmons, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  53. ^ Adam J. Taliaferro, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  54. ^ Board of Freeholders, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  55. ^ a b 2014 Gloucester County Official Directory, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  56. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  57. ^ James N. Hogan, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  58. ^ Surrogate Helene M. Reed, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  59. ^ Sheriff Carmel M. Morina, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  60. ^ Row Officers, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  61. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Gloucester, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  62. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  63. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  64. ^ 2009 Governor: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  65. ^ District information for Clayton School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 24, 2014.
  66. ^ School Data for the Clayton Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 24, 2014.
  67. ^ Herma S. Simmons Elementary School, Clayton Public Schools. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  68. ^ Clayton Middle School, Clayton Public Schools. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  69. ^ Clayton High School, Clayton Public Schools. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  70. ^ Our Schools, Clayton Public Schools. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  71. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Clayton Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  72. ^ Driscoll, Jessica. "Clayton, Pitman prepare for OK'd school upgrade referendum work", Gloucester County Times, November 30, 2009. Accessed July 19, 2011. "Voters approved bond referendums for two local school districts in September and now district officials are working with architects to prepare bid specifications and prepare for construction.In Clayton, work will likely begin this spring on a $20 million renovation and expansion project at the high school/ middle school."
  73. ^ Gloucester County School Directory. Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  74. ^ History, St. Michael the Archangel Regional School. Accessed July 26, 2013. "St. Michael the Archangel Regional School was born with the announced merger of St. Bridget Regional School and St. Catherine of Siena Regional School in November of 2007."
  75. ^ Gloucester County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  76. ^ Gloucester County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  77. ^ Dotson, Frank. "What's wrong with college baasketball?", Lakeland Ledger, December 26, 1981. Accessed July 24, 2012. "Granger Hall, a sophomore from Clayton, got off the bus on the New Jersey side of Ben Franklin Bridge, which links Camden, N.J., and Philadelphia across the Delaware River."

External links[edit]