Clement C. Dickinson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Clement Cabell Dickinson (December 6, 1849 – January 14, 1938), also known as Clement C. Dickinson, was a Democratic Representative representing Missouri from February 1, 1910, to March 3, 1921, from March 4, 1923-March 3, 1929 and from March 4, 1931-January 3, 1935.

Dickinson was born at Prince Edward Court House, Virginia in Prince Edward County, Virginia. He graduated from Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia in 1869 and taught in Virginia and Kentucky. He moved to Clinton, Missouri in 1872 where he continued to teach and study law. He was prosecuting attorney in Henry County, Missouri 1876-1882, city attorney in Clinton 1882-1884, a member Missouri House of Representatives 1900-1902 and Missouri State Senate 1902-1906. He was on the board of Central Missouri State University 1907-1913.

He was elected to Congress to succeed David A. De Armond who had died. He failed to be re-elected in 1920 but served another two terms from 1931 to 1935 but was not renominated in 1934. He is buried in Englewood Cemetery in Clinton.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Clement C. Dickinson at Find a Grave
  • [1] The extension of remarks read into the Congressional Record by Clement C. Dickenson in 1914 are included in A Tribute to the Best Friend of Man: Eulogy on the Dog printed by Violet Press in 2008.
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
David A. De Armond
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 6th congressional district

1910–1921
Succeeded by
William O. Atkeson
Preceded by
William O. Atkeson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 6th congressional district

1923–1929
Succeeded by
Thomas Jefferson Halsey
Preceded by
Thomas Jefferson Halsey
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 6th congressional district

1931–1933
Succeeded by
Reuben T. Wood
Preceded by
Robert Davis Johnson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 7th congressional district

1933–1935
Succeeded by
Dewey Short