Clemente d'Olera

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Clemente d'Olera (1501–1568) was an Italian Roman Catholic who became Minister General of the Order of Friars Minor, cardinal and bishop.

Biography[edit]

Clemente d'Olera was born in the Castle of Moneglia on June 20, 1501.[1] He joined the Order of Friars Minor Observants at a young age, spending his youth in the service of the Franciscans.[1] He then moved to Bologna to study Christian theology.[1] He then spent several years studying philosophy and theology in the religious houses of his order.[1]

In 1538, he was elected provincial superior of his order for Bologna, then he became definitor and procurator in Mantua in 1541.[1] He became the order's minister general in Corsica in 1545, with Giovanni Maltei da Calvi as his vicar general.[1] He succeeded Maltei in that office after Maltei's death in 1547, with the permission of Pope Paul III.[1] Also in 1547, at the general chapter of the order held in Assisi, he became prefect of the Franciscan Famiglia Cismontana.[1] At the general chapter held in Bologna in 1550, he was elected commissary of the curia.[1] At the 1553 general chapter held in Salamanaca, he was elected Ministers General of the Order of Friars Minor.[1] As minister general, he promulgated the Constitutiones Salmanticenses in 1554.[1] On January 1, 1555, Pope Julius III named him his commissary against heresy for anywhere he traveled except Spain.[1]

Pope Paul IV made him a cardinal priest in the consistory of March 15, 1557.[1] He received the red hat and the titular church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli on March 24, 1557.[1] He became Archpriest of Rapallo in 1558.[1] The pope also made him prefect of the Holy Office.[1] He participated in the papal conclave of 1559 that elected Pope Pius IV.[1]

On March 13, 1560, he was elected Bishop of Foligno.[1] He set up a printing press in the episcopal palace to publish works defending the faith.[1]

He participated in the papal conclave of 1565-66 that elected Pope Pius V.[1] He continued to serve on the Holy Office and became cardinal protector of the Holy Roman Empire.[1]

He died in the Franciscan convent of San Pietro in Montorio after a long illness on January 6, 1568.[1] He was buried in his titular church.[1] He left his wealth to the infirm of the hospital of San Giacomo degli Incurabili.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Entry from Biographical Dictionary of the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church