Cleveland Chiropractic College

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Cleveland Chiropractic College
Cleveland Chiropractic College - KC Seal.jpg
Cleveland Chiropractic College Seal
Motto Be Extraordinary!
Established 1922 (1922)
Type Private
President Carl S. Cleveland III
Vice-president Jeff Karp
Provost Ashley E. Cleveland
Vice-Presidents D. Clark Beckley
J. Dale Marrant
Location Overland Park, Kansas, USA
38°55′55″N 94°40′44″W / 38.93194°N 94.67889°W / 38.93194; -94.67889Coordinates: 38°55′55″N 94°40′44″W / 38.93194°N 94.67889°W / 38.93194; -94.67889
Colors      Orange
Website Cleveland.edu

Cleveland Chiropractic College is located at 10850 Lowell Ave, Overland Park, Kansas, United States. Cleveland Chiropractic College is known primarily for its Doctor of Chiropractic degree program, but offers other educational options in the health sciences. The college was started by one of the first families of chiropractic and is located in the Kansas City suburb of Overland Park, Kan. It is the only chiropractic institution in the nation still under the leadership of a founding family member.[1]

The college has been in operation in Kansas City area since 1922 and has been at its current location since 2008. Cleveland Chiropractic College-Los Angeles was located at 590 N. Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, California 90004. It had been in operation in Los Angeles since 1911, and had been at the location in Hollywood, since 1976. The campus officially closed after the ending of the summer trimester in August 2011.

History[edit]

The Central Chiropractic College in Kansas City was founded in 1922 by Drs. C.S. Cleveland Sr., Ruth R. Cleveland and Perl B. Griffin, and graduated its first doctor of chiropractic in 1924.[2]

The original campus was a converted residence that doubled the college facility and home of Dr. Carl Sr., Dr. Ruth and young son Carl S. Cleveland Jr. Dr. C.S. Cleveland Sr., the first president, was a pioneer in the field of chiropractic and chiropractic education.[2]

In 1911, Dr. Tullius Ratledge established the Los Angeles branch of the Ratledge System of Chiropractic Schools and became the champion of chiropractic on the West Coast. In 1951 Dr. Ratledge transferred management of his Los Angeles college to colleague and fellow chiropractic activist, Dr. Carl S. Cleveland Sr. Ratledge College was rechartered in 1955 as Cleveland Chiropractic College of Los Angeles.[2]

Today, the multicampus system in led by Dr. Carl S. Cleveland III, the grandson of the founders. As the chiropractic profession moves into the 21st century, Cleveland Chiropractic College continues to grow and develop in keeping with the vision of its pioneers.[2]

The Pioneers[edit]

Dr. Cleveland Sr. presided for over six decades as a chiropractic administrator and educator, serving the Kansas City Campus from 1922 to 1950 and the Los Angeles Campus from 1951 to 1982.[2]

Dr. Carl S. Cleveland Jr. served as chief executive officer of Cleveland Chiropractic College of Kansas City from 1950 to 1982 and president of Cleveland Chiropractic College of Los Angeles from 1982 to January 1992. For over 25 years, Dr. Mildred G. Cleveland, Dr. Cleveland Jr.’s wife, served the Kansas City Campus as administrator, instructor and director of the Children’s Clinic. In 1992, the two Cleveland Chiropractic Colleges joined together to form a multicampus system and Dr. Carl S. Cleveland III assumed presidency of the system.[2]

Kansas City Campus[edit]

The college was incorporated December 1922 as a non-profit, "benevolent association," which gives it the distinction of being the oldest surviving and continuously operating non-profit chiropractic college. The Articles of Incorporation were amended in 1924 to change the name of the institution to Cleveland Chiropractic College.[2]

The original campus, located at 436 Prospect Avenue, just south of the Missouri River, was a converted residence that doubled as college facility and home for Dr. Carl Sr., Dr. Ruth, and young son Carl S. Cleveland Jr. The kitchens were converted to chemistry and human dissection laboratories, with the lower living area serving as the patient clinic. The turret windows at the front of the house allowed the occupants to observe any caller at the front door. This precaution was deemed essential because many early chiropractors were arrested for the unlicensed practice of medicine prior to the 1927 passage of Missouri's chiropractic law.[2]

Dr. C.S. Cleveland Sr., the first president, was a pioneer in the field of chiropractic and chiropractic education. He served as a vocal activist and provided expert testimony, forming the basis for the passage of the Chiropractic Practice Act that legally defined the profession as a separate and distinct healing art in the state of Missouri. From the beginning, Dr. Cleveland Sr. emphasized early hands-on technique, focusing on specificity in spinal analysis and adjustive procedure, combined with instruction in x-ray analysis at a level beyond that of competing institutions of the time.[2]

Dr. Cleveland Sr. was respected for his oratory and acknowledged for his instruction in the dynamic thrust procedure of the full spine recoil adjustive technique. He was a frequent lecturer at the Palmer School and other colleges. Even as competitors in chiropractic education, Dr. Cleveland Sr. and Dr. Ruth Cleveland maintained close relationships with their alma mater, the Palmer School, and sustained a longtime friendship with the Drs. B.J. and Mable Palmer.[2]

In 1951, Dr. Cleveland Sr. relocated to Los Angeles to take leadership of the Ratledge College.[2]

Los Angeles Campus[edit]

Tullius de Florence Ratledge graduated in the first class from the Carver-Denny School in Oklahoma City. Immediately upon graduation in 1907, he collaborated with fellow chiropractors in then unsuccessful attempts to obtain chiropractic licensure in Oklahoma. He organized a free clinic – or "adjustory" – for members of the state legislature and their families in the state’s first capital city, Guthrie. And in that city, in 1908, he created the first of at least four branches of the Ratledge System of Chiropractic Schools. In true missionary fashion, he started additional schools in Arkansas City, Kansas, and in the Kansas capital of Topeka.[2]

In March of 1911, Dr. Ratledge established the Los Angeles branch of the Ratledge System of Chiropractic Schools, and became the champion of pure chiropractic on the West Coast. In 1916, he endured 90 days of imprisonment in the Los Angeles County Jail on the charge of illegally practicing medicine. His self-sacrifice for the principles of chiropractic inspired and prompted the first favorable press for the beleaguered chiropractic profession, ultimately leading to the passage of California’s chiropractic law by referendum in 1922.[2]

Approaching retirement after over 40 years in the profession, in 1951, Dr. Ratledge transferred management of his Los Angeles college, its single converted residence building, and its 17 students to colleague and fellow chiropractic activist, Dr. Cleveland Sr. Ratledge College was rechartered in 1955 as Cleveland Chiropractic College of Los Angeles.[2]

In October 2011, the Los Angeles campus was officially closed. Cleveland-LA alumni are and will remain a cherished and integral part of the Cleveland College family. Cleveland-LA is no longer a building or a program, but a network of graduates who will continue changing lives through chiropractic.[2]

Accreditation[edit]

The Cleveland Chiropractic College multicampus system is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools in Chicago, Illinois.[3] The Doctor of Chiropractic degree program of Cleveland Chiropractic College is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Chiropractic Education in Scottsdale, Arizona.[4]

The Campus[edit]

Two primary buildings provide 177,000 square feet (16,400 m2) of space. In addition, these buildings house the public Health Center, the Student Clinic, a cafeteria, the Cleveland College YMCA Express Fitness Center and the Special Beginnings daycare center.[citation needed]

The college offers the Doctor of Chiropractic degree, a Master of Science in Health Promotion, Bachelor of Science in Human Biology and an Associate of Arts in Biological Sciences. Students pursuing these degrees, as well as students pursuing degrees in other health care professions, can take their prerequisite physical and life sciences courses in accelerated, eight-week intervals at the college. Accelerated academic programs allow students to earn degrees concurrently.[citation needed]

Degree programs[edit]

  • Associate of Arts in Biological Sciences
  • Bachelor of Science in Human Biology
  • Master of Science in Health Promotion (Kansas City only)
  • Doctor of Chiropractic
    • Dual degree offering Bachelor of Science in Human Biology/ Doctor of Chiropractic

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]