Cleveland High School (Los Angeles, California)

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Grover Cleveland High School
Grover Cleveland High School (Los Angeles).JPG
Type Public school
Principal Duong, Cindy
Students 3,910
Grades 9-12
Location 8140 Vanalden Avenue,
Reseda, Los Angeles, California, USA
Coordinates 34°13′3.95″N 118°32′50.89″W / 34.2177639°N 118.5474694°W / 34.2177639; -118.5474694Coordinates: 34°13′3.95″N 118°32′50.89″W / 34.2177639°N 118.5474694°W / 34.2177639; -118.5474694
District Los Angeles Unified School District
Colors Red, White, & Black
Mascot Cavaliers
Yearbook Les Mémoires
Website Official website

Grover Cleveland High School is a public school serving grades 9-12. Cleveland Humanities Magnet is part of Cleveland High School. The school is located in Reseda, in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California.

Cleveland, a part of the Los Angeles Unified School District, was named after President Grover Cleveland. Cleveland High School is LAUSD's only comprehensive high school that holds the title of being a California Distinguished School.[citation needed]

Academics[edit]

Cleveland High School was honored as a 2005 California Distinguished School and as of 2010 was ranked the 703rd best high school in the nation by Newsweek, up from 854th the year before.[1] It has a student population of about 3800. The school is divided into small learning communities:

Extracurriculars[edit]

In both 2010 and 2012, the Speech and Debate team was the team of the CHSSA State Champion in Impromptu Speaking (Iain Lampert and Adam Revello). Since then they have continued to uphold its tradition of excellence by producing league champions in both debate and speech events.[2] Cleveland is known throughout the city for its strong aquatics program. The swim team and water polo have won CIF championships numerous times.

Notable alumni[edit]

Social Activism[edit]

The Village Nation[edit]

The Village Nation was founded in 2003, by former Cleveland High School dean, Andre Chevalier and former Cleveland High School teacher, Fluke Fluker in response to low test scores among African Americans at Cleveland High. These test scores were even lower than those of ESL (English as a Second Language) students at Cleveland High School. “It takes a village to raise a child” is the foundation of The Village Nation, the African American staff united the African American students to show them the facts of lower test scores among them, and the staff took time to mentor, tutor, and guide the students. Within a year, test scores among African American students at Cleveland High School rose up 51 points. The Village Nation has been featured on the Oprah Show, Fox 11 Special, CSUN On-Point Extra, and other local news shows.

Black and Brown Love[edit]

The Village Nation expanded its reach to the Latino community as well by creating the Black and Brown Love assembly. The Black and Brown Love assembly takes place once a year, all African American and Latino students are taken out of class and put into the school’s gym. During the assembly African American and Latino staff address the students about violence among Blacks and Latinos, discrimination, poverty, equality, and higher education. Motivational speakers and performers also come to the assembly to speak to the students in an effort to promote brotherhood, love, and peace among the African American and Latino community.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "High School Profile Page - Newsweek and The Daily Beast". Newsweek.com. 2010 (?).  Check date values in: |date= (help)[dead link]
  2. ^ "http://trivalleysite.yolasite.com/10statesreport.php".  [dead link]
  3. ^ "Baseball : Akins Plays Catch-Up With Fellow Members of U.S. Olympic Team". Los Angeles Times. August 14, 1988. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 

External links[edit]