Cleveland Quartet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cleveland Quartet
ClevelandQuartetLogo.png
Official Cleveland Quartet logo
Background information
Origin Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Genres Classical
Occupation(s) Chamber orchestra
Years active 1969 - 17 December 1995
Website www.ClevelandQuartet.com
Members William Preucil, Violin
Peter Salaff, Violin
James Dunham, Viola
Paul Katz, Cello
Past members Donald Weilerstein, Violin (1969–1988)
Martha Strongin Katz, Viola (1969–1980)
Atar Arad, Viola (1980–1987)

The Cleveland Quartet is a string quartet founded in 1969 by violinist Donald Weilerstein, at the time an instructor at the Cleveland Institute of Music, whose director Victor Babin had secured funding for an in-resident quartet (the institute's first) to be headed by Weilerstein. Weilerstein formed the group that summer at the Marlboro Music School and Festival with violinist Peter Salaff, violist Martha Strongin Katz, and cellist Paul Katz. The group was initially called the "New Cleveland Quartet." In 1971, the group left the Cleveland Institute because of disagreements over teaching loads and took up residency at the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; they dropped the word "New" from their name at this time.[1] In 1976 they made their final change of residency, moving to the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.[2]

The quartet had three personnel changes: violist Atar Arad replaced Strongin Katz in 1980; violist James Dunham then replaced Arad in 1987; and William Preucil replaced Weilerstein as first violin in 1989. The quartet disbanded in 1995. Preucil became concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra, a position he still holds. Paul Katz, Martha Strongin Katz and Donald Weilerstein are on the faculty of the New England Conservatory of Music, and Weilerstein performs in a trio with his wife Vivian Hornik Weilerstein and his daughter, cellist Alisa Weilerstein; Peter Salaff is on the faculty of the Cleveland Institute of Music; Atar Arad teaches at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University; and James Dunham teaches at the conservatory at Rice University. The quartet has an extensive discography with the Cleveland-based label Telarc.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Potter, Tully. "Cleveland Quartet". Grove Music Online. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 25 June 2014. 
  2. ^ CLEVELAND QUARTET - The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History

External links[edit]