Cliff House (Manitou Springs, Colorado)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cliff House
Cliff House, Manitou Springs, CO.jpg
Cliff House (Manitou Springs, Colorado) is located in Colorado
Cliff House (Manitou Springs, Colorado)
Location 306 Canon Avenue, Manitou Springs, Colorado
Coordinates 38°51′34.77″N 104°55′2.56″W / 38.8596583°N 104.9173778°W / 38.8596583; -104.9173778Coordinates: 38°51′34.77″N 104°55′2.56″W / 38.8596583°N 104.9173778°W / 38.8596583; -104.9173778
NRHP Reference # 80000897
Added to NRHP 1980[1]

Cliff House in Manitou Springs, Colorado is a Queen Anne style hotel in the Manitou Springs Historic District. It is a National Register of Historic Places listing.[2] The Cliff House at Pikes Peak is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.[3]

History[edit]

Mr. Webster and Mr. Shurtleff, entrepreneurs from Canada, provided the investment to build Cliff House, the second large hotel in Manitou Springs in 1874. It is located near the Soda and Navajo Springs. Before its addition, sometime after 1874, the hotel could serve up to 100 people.[4][nb 1]

The hotel, once a stagecoach stop, was visited by Clark Gable and Theodore Roosevelt.[6]

Gallery[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The first was Manitou House, which was built in 1872 on the present grounds of Memorial Park, near the present Seven Minute Springs.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. 
  2. ^ National Register of Historic Places in El Paso County, Colorado. American Dreams. Retrieved May 3, 2013.
  3. ^ The Cliff House at Pikes Peak, a Historic Hotels of America member. Historic Hotels of America. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  4. ^ Deborah Harrison (November 1, 2003). Manitou Springs. Arcadia Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-7385-2856-4. Retrieved May 4, 2013. 
  5. ^ Deborah Harrison (November 1, 2003). Manitou Springs. Arcadia Publishing. p. 13. ISBN 978-0-7385-2856-4. Retrieved May 4, 2013. 
  6. ^ Best of Colorado. Big Earth Publishing. 1 September 2002. p. 85. ISBN 978-1-56579-429-0. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 

External links[edit]