Clifford Paterson Lecture

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The Clifford Paterson Lecture is a prize lecture of the Royal Society given annually on an engineering topic. A £500 gift is given to the lecturer.[1] The lectures, which honour Clifford Copland Paterson,[2] founder-director of the GEC Wembley Research Laboratories 1918-1948, were instituted by the General Electric Company plc in 1975.

Clifford Paterson Lectures[edit]

  • 1976 Eric Eastwood on Radar: new techniques and applications
  • 1977 Gordon Rawcliffe on Induction motors: old and new
  • 1978 Eric Ash on Recent advances in acoustic imaging
  • 1979 Gordon George Scarrott on From slave to servant: the evolution of computing systems
  • 1980 Derek Harry Roberts on Memory: its function, technology and impact
  • 1981 Cyril Hilsum on Electronic displays: the link between man and microcircuit
  • 1982 Michael Crowley-Milling on The worlds largest accelerator: the electron-positron collider LEP
  • 1983 John Edwin Midwinter on Optical fibre communications, present and future
  • 1984 Alexander Lamb Cullen on Microwaves: the art and the science
  • 1985 George William Gray on Liquid crystals: an arena for research and industrial collaboration among chemists, physicists and engineers
  • 1986 Alec Nigel Broers on Fundamental limits to microstructure fabrication
  • 1987 Gareth Gwyn Roberts on At home with science and technology
  • 1988 Walter Thompson Welford on Microlithography and the ultraviolet: experiments with an excimer laser
  • 1989 Alan Walter Rudge on The organization and management of R&D in a privatised British Telecom [3]
  • 1990 Maurice Wilkes on Progress and research in the computer industry [3]
  • 1991 David N. Payne on Circuits, sensors and strands of light[3]
  • 1992 Marcel Garnier on Magnetohydrodynamics in material processing[3]
  • 1993 I.R. Young on Accurate measurement in in vivo magnetic resonance: an engineering problem?[3]
  • 1994 Michael Brady on Seeing machines and robots[3]
  • 1995 Frank Kelly on Modelling communication networks: present and future[4]
  • 1996 Martin Wood on Superconductivity: will the dream come true?[3]
  • 1997 Gareth Parry on From electrons and photons to optoelectronics and photonics[3]
  • 1998 Colin Webb on Making light work: applications of high power lasers[3]
  • 1999 Andy Hopper on Progress and research in the communications industry[3]
  • 2000 Eli Yablonovitch on Electronmagnetic bandgaps, at photonic and radio frequencies[3]
  • 2001 Allan Snyder on Light guiding light in the new millennium[3]
  • 2002 Roger Needham on Computer Security?[3]
  • 2003 Chris Toumazou on The bionic man[3]
  • 2004 Sandu Popescu on What is quantum non-locality?[3]
  • 2005 Wilson Sibbett on Optical science in the fast lane[3]
  • 2006 Richard Friend on Plastic fantastic; electronics for the 21st Century. The lecture can be view from the Video Library [3]
  • 2008 Martin Bodo Plenio, on Taming the Quanta[3]
  • 2009 Andrew DeMello on The Lilliput laboratory: chemistry & biology on the small scale [3]
  • 2010 David MacKay on Information theory meets writing[3]
  • 2011 S. Ravi P. Silva on Carbon electronics[3]
  • 2012 Molly Stevens on Regenerating organs and other small challenges[3]
  • 2014 Polina Bayvel on Fundamental research in high bandwidth digital communications and nonlinear optics [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Clifford Paterson Lecture (1975)". The Royal Society. Retrieved 2010-06-11. 
  2. ^ Ryde, J. W. (1949). "Clifford Copland Paterson. 1879-1948". Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society 6 (18): 479. doi:10.1098/rsbm.1949.0010. JSTOR 768937.  edit
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Clifford Paterson Lecture". The Royal Society. Retrieved 2012-05-18. 
  4. ^ Kelly, F. P. (1996). "The Clifford Paterson Lecture, 1995: Modelling Communication Networks, Present and Future". Philosophical Transactions: Mathematical 354 (1707): 437–463. doi:10.1098/rsta.1996.0016.  edit